Mask

Bugaku Mask, Ryo-o by Deme Yasui Dated 1763

Lacquer over wood mask of Ryo-o, by Deme Yasui dated 1763, from the Prince Tokugawa Collection is believed to be an exact copy of a mask from the Hachimangu Tsurugaoka Shrine in Kamakura.  This mask is one of 23 Bugaku masks formerly from the Prince Tokugawa Collection acquired from the estate of Professor Charles Smith, Univeristy of Washington.

The Edo branch of the Tokugawa clan, which was closely aligned with the Tsurugaoku Hachimangu Shrine, apparently commissioned Deme Yusui (d. 1766) and other master mask carvers to copy a full set of the Bugaku masks of the Shrine about 1760.  The Shrine unfortunately burned in the late 18th century and only a handful of the original masks were saved.   Fortunately, original drawings of the Shrine’s masks were not lost.  The recorded history of Deme Yasui’s project, however, was lost and while it was known copies had been made of their masks, it was not known a large collection of their masks existed.

In May 2010, several masks from the Prince Tokugawa Collection were taken to the Hachimangu Tsurugaoka Shrine for research and authentication.  By matching the masks against the original drawings of the original masks, it was determined all of the Bugaku masks from the Prince Tokugawa Collection were, in fact, copies of the original masks and all were probably produced between 1760 and 1765.  Some lacquer loss.

14 x 16 inches

35.5 x 40.6 cm

Returned to Hachimangu Tsurugaoka


Japanese Bugaku Mask. Emi Nimai Men, by Deme Yasui, c. 1760

 

 

This fabulous lacquer over wood mask of Emi Nimai Men by Deme Yasui, c 1760,  from the Prince Tokugawa Collection, is believed to be an exact copy of a mask from the Hachimangu Tsurugaoka Shrine in Kamakura.  This mask is one of 23 Bugaku masks formerly from the Prince Tokugawa Collection acquired from the estate of Professor Charles Smith, Univeristy of Washington.

The Edo branch of the Tokugawa clan, which was closely aligned with the Tsurugaoku Hachimangu Shrine, apparently commissioned Deme Yusui (d. 1766) and other master mask carvers to copy a full set of the Bugaku masks of the Shrine about 1760.  The Shrine unfortunately burned in the late 18th century and only a handful of the original masks were saved.   Fortunately, original drawings of the Shrine’s masks were not lost.  The recorded history of Deme Yasui’s project, however, was lost and while it was known copies had been made of their masks, it was not known a large collection of their masks existed.

In May 2010, several masks from the Prince Tokugawa Collection were taken to the Hachimangu Tsurugaoka Shrine for research and authentication.  By matching the masks against the original drawings of the original masks, it was determined all of the Bugaku masks from the Prince Tokugawa Collection were, in fact, copies of the original masks and all were probably produced between 1760 and 1765.  Significant lacquer loss.

11.25 x 8 x 6.5 inches

28.6 x 20.3 x 16.5 cm

$6500


Bugaku Mask, Hare Nimai Men by Deme Yasui, dated 1763

 

 

Dated November, 13th year of Horeki period, this fabulous lacquer over wood mask of Hare Nimai Men by Deme Yasui, c 1760,  from the Prince Tokugawa Collection is believed to be an exact copy of a mask from the Hachimangu Tsurugaoka Shrine in Kamakura.  This mask is one of 23 Bugaku masks formerly from the Prince Tokugawa Collection acquired from the estate of Professor Charles Smith, Univeristy of Washington.

The Edo branch of the Tokugawa clan, which was closely aligned with the Tsurugaoku Hachimangu Shrine, apparently commissioned Deme Yusui (d. 1766) and other master mask carvers to copy a full set of the Bugaku masks of the Shrine about 1760.  The Shrine unfortunately burned in the late 18th century and only a handful of the original masks were saved.   Fortunately, original drawings of the Shrine’s masks were not lost.  The recorded history of Deme Yasui’s project, however, was lost and while it was known copies had been made of their masks, it was not known a large collection of their masks existed.

In May 2010, several masks from the Prince Tokugawa Collection were taken to the Hachimangu Tsurugaoka Shrine for research and authentication.  By matching the masks against the original drawings of the original masks, it was determined all of the Bugaku masks from the Prince Tokugawa Collection were, in fact, copies of the original masks and all were probably produced between 1760 and 1765.

Significant lacquer loss.  c. 1764

11.25 x 8 x 6.5 inches

28.6 x 20.3 x 16.5 cm

$6500


Bugaku Mask, Hosorokuseri, c. 1760

 

This fabulous lacquer over wood mask of Hosorokuseri, c 1760,  from the Prince Tokugawa Collection is believed to be an exact copy of a mask from the Hachimangu Tsurugaoka Shrine in Kamakura.  This mask is one of 23 Bugaku masks formerly from the Prince Tokugawa Collection acquired from the estate of Professor Charles Smith, Univeristy of Washington.

The Edo branch of the Tokugawa clan, which was closely aligned with the Tsurugaoku Hachimangu Shrine, apparently commissioned Deme Yusui (d. 1766) and other master mask carvers to copy a full set of the Bugaku masks of the Shrine about 1760.  The Shrine unfortunately burned in the late 18th century and only a handful of the original masks were saved.   Fortunately, original drawings of the Shrine’s masks were not lost.  The recorded history of Deme Yasui’s project, however, was lost and while it was known copies had been made of their masks, it was not known a large collection of their masks existed.

In May 2010, several masks from the Prince Tokugawa Collection were taken to the Hachimangu Tsurugaoka Shrine for research and authentication.  By matching the masks against the original drawings of the original masks, it was determined all of the Bugaku masks from the Prince Tokugawa Collection were, in fact, copies of the original masks and all were probably produced between 1760 and 1765.

Significant lacquer loss.

7.5 x 6 inches

19.1 x 15.2 cm

$5500


Japanese Bugaku Mask, Ayakiri, c. 1760

 

 

Bugaku mask of Ayakiri, lacquered wood,

The Edo branch of the Tokugawa clan, which was closely aligned with the Tsurugaoku Hachimangu Shrine, apparently commissioned Deme Yusui (d. 1766) and other master mask carvers to copy a full set of the Bugaku masks of the Shrine about 1760.  The Shrine unfortunately burned in the late 18th century and only a handful of the original masks were saved.   Fortunately, original drawings of the Shrine’s masks were not lost.  The recorded history of Deme Yasui’s project, however, was lost and while it was known copies had been made of their masks, it was not known a large collection of their masks existed.

In May 2010, several masks from the Prince Tokugawa Collection were taken to the Hachimangu Tsurugaoka Shrine for research and authentication.  By matching the masks against the original drawings of the original masks, it was determined all of the Bugaku masks from the Prince Tokugawa Collection were, in fact, copies of the original masks and all were probably produced between 1760 and 1765.

Damage to left side of face.  c. 1763

7.25 x 6 x 4.5 inches

18.4 x 15.2 x 11.4 cm

SOLD


Bugaku Mask, Kocho-So, c. 1760

 

 

 

This fabulous lacquer over wood mask of Kocho-So, c. 1760,  from the Prince Tokugawa Collection is believed to be an exact copy of a mask from the Hachimangu Tsurugaoka Shrine in Kamakura.  This mask is one of 23 Bugaku masks formerly from the Prince Tokugawa Collection acquired from the estate of Professor Charles Smith, Univeristy of Washington.

The Edo branch of the Tokugawa clan, which was closely aligned with the Tsurugaoku Hachimangu Shrine, apparently commissioned Deme Yusui (d. 1766) and other master mask carvers to copy a full set of the Bugaku masks of the Shrine about 1760.  The Shrine unfortunately burned in the late 18th century and only a handful of the original masks were saved.   Fortunately, original drawings of the Shrine’s masks were not lost.  The recorded history of Deme Yasui’s project, however, was lost and while it was known copies had been made of their masks, it was not known a large collection of their masks existed.

In May 2010, several masks from the Prince Tokugawa Collection were taken to the Hachimangu Tsurugaoka Shrine for research and authentication.  By matching the masks against the original drawings of the original masks, it was determined all of the Bugaku masks from the Prince Tokugawa Collection were, in fact, copies of the original masks and all were probably produced between 1760 and 1765.

Significant lacquer loss.

8.5 x 5.75 inches

21.6 x 14.6 cm

$7500


Pair of Bugaku Masks, Hassen Men, c. 1760

This pair of lacquer over wood masks of Hassen Men, c 1760,  from the Prince Tokugawa Collection is believed to be an exact copy of a mask from the Hachimangu Tsurugaoka Shrine in Kamakura.  This mask is one of 23 Bugaku masks formerly from the Prince Tokugawa Collection acquired from the estate of Professor Charles Smith, Univeristy of Washington.

The Edo branch of the Tokugawa clan, which was closely aligned with the Tsurugaoku Hachimangu Shrine, apparently commissioned Deme Yusui (d. 1766) and other master mask carvers to copy a full set of the Bugaku masks of the Shrine about 1760.  The Shrine unfortunately burned in the late 18th century and only a handful of the original masks were saved.   Fortunately, original drawings of the Shrine’s masks were not lost.  The recorded history of Deme Yasui’s project, however, was lost and while it was known copies had been made of their masks, it was not known a large collection of their masks existed.

In May 2010, several masks from the Prince Tokugawa Collection were taken to the Hachimangu Tsurugaoka Shrine for research and authentication.  By matching the masks against the original drawings of the original masks, it was determined all of the Bugaku masks from the Prince Tokugawa Collection were, in fact, copies of the original masks and all were probably produced between 1760 and 1765.  Minor lacquer loss.

8.5 x 6.5 inches

21.6 x 16.5 cm

$6500 each


Noh Mask, Sankojoh, signed Kawachi, 17th Century

 

 

 

 

This Sankojoh mask is signed Kawachi, the foremost carver of the Edo Period.  In delicate condition with most of the lacquer and hair tufts missing and the mask has been modified into an okina type mask.

8 x 6.25 inches

20.3 x 15.9 cm

$5750


Gigaku Mask, Suikojo, Early Edo Period, 17th Century

 

 

Gigaku drama was introduced into Japan in the early 7th century from Korea and preceded Bugaku and Noh.  Unlike Bugaku and Noh masks, Gigaku masks cover the entire head.

This mask, depicting Suikojo, probably dates from the 17th century and is from the collection of Professor Charles Smith of University of Washington.

11.75 x 7.5 inches

29.8 x 19.1 cm

$8500


Bugaku Mask, Ojin Tei, c. 1760

 

This fabulous lacquer over wood mask of Ojin Tei, c 1760,  from the Prince Tokugawa Collection is believed to be an exact copy of a mask from the Hachimangu Tsurugaoka Shrine in Kamakura.  This mask is one of 23 Bugaku masks formerly from the Prince Tokugawa Collection acquired from the estate of Professor Charles Smith, Univeristy of Washington.

The Edo branch of the Tokugawa clan, which was closely aligned with the Tsurugaoku Hachimangu Shrine, apparently commissioned Deme Yusui (d. 1766) and other master mask carvers to copy a full set of the Bugaku masks of the Shrine about 1760.  The Shrine unfortunately burned in the late 18th century and only a handful of the original masks were saved.   Fortunately, original drawings of the Shrine’s masks were not lost.  The recorded history of Deme Yasui’s project, however, was lost and while it was known copies had been made of their masks, it was not known a large collection of their masks existed.

In May 2010, several masks from the Prince Tokugawa Collection were taken to the Hachimangu Tsurugaoka Shrine for research and authentication.  By matching the masks against the original drawings of the original masks, it was determined all of the Bugaku masks from the Prince Tokugawa Collection were, in fact, copies of the original masks and all were probably produced between 1760 and 1765.  Significant lacquer loss.

9 x 7 inches

22.9 x 17.8 cm

SOLD



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