Tibet and Nepal

Jataka Thangka, Bhutan, 18-19th Century

Based on the teachings of Siddhartha Gautama, who lived primarily in India during the 5th century BC, today, more than 500 million followers practice Buddhism, the world’s 4th largest religion. Two major variants of practice are Theravada, which strives for the ultimate state of nirvana for the individual, and Mahayana, which strives not for nirvana, but rather to Buddhahood via states of rebirth to help others reach awakening.
Known as Buddha, Gautama was believed to have lived many lives in his quest for enlightenment. Stories about his previous lives, many which originated in Hindu folklore, are called Jataka tales and often, like Aesop’s fables, had morals.
Thangkas are Tibetan Buddhism paintings on cotton or silk, usually depicting dieties, landscapes, or mandala, a spiritual representation of the universe.
In this 18/19th century Jataka Thangka from Bhutan, a small country sandwiched between India and Tibet, featuring distemper on cloth, the Buddha’s hands rest on his lap in the Dhyana (Meditation) mudra supporting a black begging bowl filled with flowers. Wearing patched saffron red robes of a fully ordained monk, he sits on a white lotus pedestal with his legs folded in vajra position, his peaceful, perfectly symmetrical face seems to be offering a slight smile. His tightly curled blue-black hair is combed into a single knot centered above his head and crested by a gold top-knot ornament, while long, split ears, signifying a prince, hang from each side of his face.  He wears the patched red and saffron robe of an ordained priest as he sits on a white lotus pedestal with his legs folded in vajra position. around him, Jataka tales about previous lives of the Buddha, in both human and animal forms, teach virtues, compassion, and sacrifice.
32.25 x 25 inches

32.25 x 25.23 inches

81.9 x 63.5 cm

$6500


Tibetan Silver and Copper Gau (Portable Traveling Shrine), 19th Century

Silver alloy mihrab Gau (portable shrine box), decorated in repousse on the cover with a pattern of abstract scrolls and the eight auspicious Buddhist emblems.   The back, sides, and side handles are copper. Also called a “gau,” these prayer boxes were used to hold protective amulets, personal deities, and written prayers. A strap or belt could be attached to the side handles when traveling.  19th century

2.63 x 1.9 inches

6.68 x 4.82 cm

$325

 


Tibetan Gau (Portable Shrine Prayer Box), Copper, 19th Century

Exquisite copper Tibetan Gau with eight auspicious Buddhist emblems holding clay amulet image of the Buddha. These prayer boxes were used to hold protective amulets, personal deities, and written prayers. A strap or belt could be attached to the side handles when traveling.  19th century or earlier

4,5 x 3.25 inches

11.43 x 8/26 inches

$450


Gilded Copper Alloy Vairochana, Tibet, 17th Century

Gilded copper alloy figure of Vairochana on a triangular double-lotus pedestal, his hands held in dharmachakra mudra, with downcast eyes and serene face and a central urna below an elaborate crown, his right shoulder adorned with a padma flower supporting a khadga.  Sealed.  Tibet, 17th century.  Losses to lotus flower from left shoulder and inlaid beads. Khadga is bent.

4.5 inches

11.4 cm

SOLD


Gilded Copper Alloy Kubera, Tibet, 18th Century

Seated gilded copper alloy Kubera with painted hair and ear rings holding a mongoose spitting precious gems in his left hand.  A snake is wrapped around his neck and his torso while a victory banner wraps around his back, Tibet, 18th century.  Seal has been removed.

4.5 inches

11.4 cm

$5500


Copper Alloy Kubera on a Dragon, Tibet, 18th Century

Patinated copper alloy image of Kubera (also known as White Jambhala), the Hindu and Buddhist god of wealth, riding on the back of a dragon, both on a lotus base.  He is wearing a tiara and supports a victory banner that surrounds his head, while a mongoose sits in front of the dragon, spitting precious gems into a pile as the five-clawed dragon grabs precious gems with its clawed-feet.

8.5 inches tall

21.6 cm tall

$4500


Bronze Vyala (Leogryph), Nepal, 19th Century

Pair of 19th Century Nepalese Vyala (Leogryphs), a horned leonine creature with wings, which are typically placed  to protect each side of a temple.  This pair consists of a male and female, with the sleek body and curled mane of a lion, menacingly baring their teeth to ward off evil spirits.

17 x 16.5 inches

43.8 x 41.91

SOLD



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