Takeo Karatsu Bean Jar, Japan, Edo Period, 17th Century

Porcelain is defined as a ceramic material made by heating clay-type materials to high temperatures. It includes clay in the form of kaolinite and has been produced in China for more than 2000 years and in Korea for at least 1600 years, but was not developed in Japan up until the end of the 16th century.

Between 1592 and 1597, Japan, under the military rule of Toyotomi Hideyoshi invaded Korea two times with the intent to conquer both Korea and ultimately, China. Both invasions failed, but an estimated 400 potters and their families were kidnapped and taken to Japan to develop porcelain production, which up until then, was a closely guarded secret.

This large, wide-mouthed bean jar from the Yumino kiln in the Takeo area south of Karatsu, Japan, has a simplified pine tree sketched in iron and green and amber glazes over a brushed white slip. This type of stoneware was introduced to Japan by Korean potters around the end of the 16th century and very closely resembled Buncheong ceramics, a Korean porcelain. A similarly decorated bottle was exhibited in the Korean Buncheong Ceramics Exhibit from Leeum, Samsung Museum of Art and is shown as Catalogue 60 on page 109 of the exhibition book.  17/18th century

12.25 x 14 inches

31.1 x 35.6 cm 

$8500



Copyright © 2017 The Scanlan Collection. All Rights Reserved.




More items related to: ,

Takeo Karatsu Bean Jar, Japan, Edo Period, 17th Century

Porcelain is defined as a ceramic material made by heating clay-type materials to high temperatures. It includes clay in the form of kaolinite and has been produced in China for more than 2000 years and in Korea for at least 1600 years, but was not developed in Japan up until the end of the 16th century.

Between 1592 and 1597, Japan, under the military rule of Toyotomi Hideyoshi invaded Korea two times with the intent to conquer both Korea and ultimately, China. Both invasions failed, but an estimated 400 potters and their families were kidnapped and taken to Japan to develop porcelain production, which up until then, was a closely guarded secret.

This large, wide-mouthed bean jar from the Yumino kiln in the Takeo area south of Karatsu, Japan, has a simplified pine tree sketched in iron and green and amber glazes over a brushed white slip. This type of stoneware was introduced to Japan by Korean potters around the end of the 16th century and very closely resembled Buncheong ceramics, a Korean porcelain. A similarly decorated bottle was exhibited in the Korean Buncheong Ceramics Exhibit from Leeum, Samsung Museum of Art and is shown as Catalogue 60 on page 109 of the exhibition book.  17/18th century

12.25 x 14 inches

31.1 x 35.6 cm 

$8500





More items related to: ,

Takeo Karatsu Bean Jar, Japan, Edo Period, 17th Century

Porcelain is defined as a ceramic material made by heating clay-type materials to high temperatures. It includes clay in the form of kaolinite and has been produced in China for more than 2000 years and in Korea for at least 1600 years, but was not developed in Japan up until the end of the 16th century.

Between 1592 and 1597, Japan, under the military rule of Toyotomi Hideyoshi invaded Korea two times with the intent to conquer both Korea and ultimately, China. Both invasions failed, but an estimated 400 potters and their families were kidnapped and taken to Japan to develop porcelain production, which up until then, was a closely guarded secret.

This large, wide-mouthed bean jar from the Yumino kiln in the Takeo area south of Karatsu, Japan, has a simplified pine tree sketched in iron and green and amber glazes over a brushed white slip. This type of stoneware was introduced to Japan by Korean potters around the end of the 16th century and very closely resembled Buncheong ceramics, a Korean porcelain. A similarly decorated bottle was exhibited in the Korean Buncheong Ceramics Exhibit from Leeum, Samsung Museum of Art and is shown as Catalogue 60 on page 109 of the exhibition book.  17/18th century

12.25 x 14 inches

31.1 x 35.6 cm 

$8500





More items related to: ,

Takeo Karatsu Bean Jar, Japan, Edo Period, 17th Century

Porcelain is defined as a ceramic material made by heating clay-type materials to high temperatures. It includes clay in the form of kaolinite and has been produced in China for more than 2000 years and in Korea for at least 1600 years, but was not developed in Japan up until the end of the 16th century.

Between 1592 and 1597, Japan, under the military rule of Toyotomi Hideyoshi invaded Korea two times with the intent to conquer both Korea and ultimately, China. Both invasions failed, but an estimated 400 potters and their families were kidnapped and taken to Japan to develop porcelain production, which up until then, was a closely guarded secret.

This large, wide-mouthed bean jar from the Yumino kiln in the Takeo area south of Karatsu, Japan, has a simplified pine tree sketched in iron and green and amber glazes over a brushed white slip. This type of stoneware was introduced to Japan by Korean potters around the end of the 16th century and very closely resembled Buncheong ceramics, a Korean porcelain. A similarly decorated bottle was exhibited in the Korean Buncheong Ceramics Exhibit from Leeum, Samsung Museum of Art and is shown as Catalogue 60 on page 109 of the exhibition book.  17/18th century

12.25 x 14 inches

31.1 x 35.6 cm 

$8500





More items related to: ,

Takeo Karatsu Bean Jar, Japan, Edo Period, 17th Century

Porcelain is defined as a ceramic material made by heating clay-type materials to high temperatures. It includes clay in the form of kaolinite and has been produced in China for more than 2000 years and in Korea for at least 1600 years, but was not developed in Japan up until the end of the 16th century.

Between 1592 and 1597, Japan, under the military rule of Toyotomi Hideyoshi invaded Korea two times with the intent to conquer both Korea and ultimately, China. Both invasions failed, but an estimated 400 potters and their families were kidnapped and taken to Japan to develop porcelain production, which up until then, was a closely guarded secret.

This large, wide-mouthed bean jar from the Yumino kiln in the Takeo area south of Karatsu, Japan, has a simplified pine tree sketched in iron and green and amber glazes over a brushed white slip. This type of stoneware was introduced to Japan by Korean potters around the end of the 16th century and very closely resembled Buncheong ceramics, a Korean porcelain. A similarly decorated bottle was exhibited in the Korean Buncheong Ceramics Exhibit from Leeum, Samsung Museum of Art and is shown as Catalogue 60 on page 109 of the exhibition book.  17/18th century

12.25 x 14 inches

31.1 x 35.6 cm 

$8500





More items related to: ,

Takeo Karatsu Bean Jar, Japan, Edo Period, 17th Century

Porcelain is defined as a ceramic material made by heating clay-type materials to high temperatures. It includes clay in the form of kaolinite and has been produced in China for more than 2000 years and in Korea for at least 1600 years, but was not developed in Japan up until the end of the 16th century.

Between 1592 and 1597, Japan, under the military rule of Toyotomi Hideyoshi invaded Korea two times with the intent to conquer both Korea and ultimately, China. Both invasions failed, but an estimated 400 potters and their families were kidnapped and taken to Japan to develop porcelain production, which up until then, was a closely guarded secret.

This large, wide-mouthed bean jar from the Yumino kiln in the Takeo area south of Karatsu, Japan, has a simplified pine tree sketched in iron and green and amber glazes over a brushed white slip. This type of stoneware was introduced to Japan by Korean potters around the end of the 16th century and very closely resembled Buncheong ceramics, a Korean porcelain. A similarly decorated bottle was exhibited in the Korean Buncheong Ceramics Exhibit from Leeum, Samsung Museum of Art and is shown as Catalogue 60 on page 109 of the exhibition book.  17/18th century

12.25 x 14 inches

31.1 x 35.6 cm 

$8500





More items related to: ,

Takeo Karatsu Bean Jar, Japan, Edo Period, 17th Century

Porcelain is defined as a ceramic material made by heating clay-type materials to high temperatures. It includes clay in the form of kaolinite and has been produced in China for more than 2000 years and in Korea for at least 1600 years, but was not developed in Japan up until the end of the 16th century.

Between 1592 and 1597, Japan, under the military rule of Toyotomi Hideyoshi invaded Korea two times with the intent to conquer both Korea and ultimately, China. Both invasions failed, but an estimated 400 potters and their families were kidnapped and taken to Japan to develop porcelain production, which up until then, was a closely guarded secret.

This large, wide-mouthed bean jar from the Yumino kiln in the Takeo area south of Karatsu, Japan, has a simplified pine tree sketched in iron and green and amber glazes over a brushed white slip. This type of stoneware was introduced to Japan by Korean potters around the end of the 16th century and very closely resembled Buncheong ceramics, a Korean porcelain. A similarly decorated bottle was exhibited in the Korean Buncheong Ceramics Exhibit from Leeum, Samsung Museum of Art and is shown as Catalogue 60 on page 109 of the exhibition book.  17/18th century

12.25 x 14 inches

31.1 x 35.6 cm 

$8500





More items related to: ,

Takeo Karatsu Bean Jar, Japan, Edo Period, 17th Century

Porcelain is defined as a ceramic material made by heating clay-type materials to high temperatures. It includes clay in the form of kaolinite and has been produced in China for more than 2000 years and in Korea for at least 1600 years, but was not developed in Japan up until the end of the 16th century.

Between 1592 and 1597, Japan, under the military rule of Toyotomi Hideyoshi invaded Korea two times with the intent to conquer both Korea and ultimately, China. Both invasions failed, but an estimated 400 potters and their families were kidnapped and taken to Japan to develop porcelain production, which up until then, was a closely guarded secret.

This large, wide-mouthed bean jar from the Yumino kiln in the Takeo area south of Karatsu, Japan, has a simplified pine tree sketched in iron and green and amber glazes over a brushed white slip. This type of stoneware was introduced to Japan by Korean potters around the end of the 16th century and very closely resembled Buncheong ceramics, a Korean porcelain. A similarly decorated bottle was exhibited in the Korean Buncheong Ceramics Exhibit from Leeum, Samsung Museum of Art and is shown as Catalogue 60 on page 109 of the exhibition book.  17/18th century

12.25 x 14 inches

31.1 x 35.6 cm 

$8500





More items related to: ,

Takeo Karatsu Bean Jar, Japan, Edo Period, 17th Century

Porcelain is defined as a ceramic material made by heating clay-type materials to high temperatures. It includes clay in the form of kaolinite and has been produced in China for more than 2000 years and in Korea for at least 1600 years, but was not developed in Japan up until the end of the 16th century.

Between 1592 and 1597, Japan, under the military rule of Toyotomi Hideyoshi invaded Korea two times with the intent to conquer both Korea and ultimately, China. Both invasions failed, but an estimated 400 potters and their families were kidnapped and taken to Japan to develop porcelain production, which up until then, was a closely guarded secret.

This large, wide-mouthed bean jar from the Yumino kiln in the Takeo area south of Karatsu, Japan, has a simplified pine tree sketched in iron and green and amber glazes over a brushed white slip. This type of stoneware was introduced to Japan by Korean potters around the end of the 16th century and very closely resembled Buncheong ceramics, a Korean porcelain. A similarly decorated bottle was exhibited in the Korean Buncheong Ceramics Exhibit from Leeum, Samsung Museum of Art and is shown as Catalogue 60 on page 109 of the exhibition book.  17/18th century

12.25 x 14 inches

31.1 x 35.6 cm 

$8500





More items related to: ,

Takeo Karatsu Bean Jar, Japan, Edo Period, 17th Century

Porcelain is defined as a ceramic material made by heating clay-type materials to high temperatures. It includes clay in the form of kaolinite and has been produced in China for more than 2000 years and in Korea for at least 1600 years, but was not developed in Japan up until the end of the 16th century.

Between 1592 and 1597, Japan, under the military rule of Toyotomi Hideyoshi invaded Korea two times with the intent to conquer both Korea and ultimately, China. Both invasions failed, but an estimated 400 potters and their families were kidnapped and taken to Japan to develop porcelain production, which up until then, was a closely guarded secret.

This large, wide-mouthed bean jar from the Yumino kiln in the Takeo area south of Karatsu, Japan, has a simplified pine tree sketched in iron and green and amber glazes over a brushed white slip. This type of stoneware was introduced to Japan by Korean potters around the end of the 16th century and very closely resembled Buncheong ceramics, a Korean porcelain. A similarly decorated bottle was exhibited in the Korean Buncheong Ceramics Exhibit from Leeum, Samsung Museum of Art and is shown as Catalogue 60 on page 109 of the exhibition book.  17/18th century

12.25 x 14 inches

31.1 x 35.6 cm 

$8500





More items related to: ,

Takeo Karatsu Bean Jar, Japan, Edo Period, 17th Century

Porcelain is defined as a ceramic material made by heating clay-type materials to high temperatures. It includes clay in the form of kaolinite and has been produced in China for more than 2000 years and in Korea for at least 1600 years, but was not developed in Japan up until the end of the 16th century.

Between 1592 and 1597, Japan, under the military rule of Toyotomi Hideyoshi invaded Korea two times with the intent to conquer both Korea and ultimately, China. Both invasions failed, but an estimated 400 potters and their families were kidnapped and taken to Japan to develop porcelain production, which up until then, was a closely guarded secret.

This large, wide-mouthed bean jar from the Yumino kiln in the Takeo area south of Karatsu, Japan, has a simplified pine tree sketched in iron and green and amber glazes over a brushed white slip. This type of stoneware was introduced to Japan by Korean potters around the end of the 16th century and very closely resembled Buncheong ceramics, a Korean porcelain. A similarly decorated bottle was exhibited in the Korean Buncheong Ceramics Exhibit from Leeum, Samsung Museum of Art and is shown as Catalogue 60 on page 109 of the exhibition book.  17/18th century

12.25 x 14 inches

31.1 x 35.6 cm 

$8500





More items related to: ,

Takeo Karatsu Bean Jar, Japan, Edo Period, 17th Century

Porcelain is defined as a ceramic material made by heating clay-type materials to high temperatures. It includes clay in the form of kaolinite and has been produced in China for more than 2000 years and in Korea for at least 1600 years, but was not developed in Japan up until the end of the 16th century.

Between 1592 and 1597, Japan, under the military rule of Toyotomi Hideyoshi invaded Korea two times with the intent to conquer both Korea and ultimately, China. Both invasions failed, but an estimated 400 potters and their families were kidnapped and taken to Japan to develop porcelain production, which up until then, was a closely guarded secret.

This large, wide-mouthed bean jar from the Yumino kiln in the Takeo area south of Karatsu, Japan, has a simplified pine tree sketched in iron and green and amber glazes over a brushed white slip. This type of stoneware was introduced to Japan by Korean potters around the end of the 16th century and very closely resembled Buncheong ceramics, a Korean porcelain. A similarly decorated bottle was exhibited in the Korean Buncheong Ceramics Exhibit from Leeum, Samsung Museum of Art and is shown as Catalogue 60 on page 109 of the exhibition book.  17/18th century

12.25 x 14 inches

31.1 x 35.6 cm 

$8500





More items related to: ,

Takeo Karatsu Bean Jar, Japan, Edo Period, 17th Century

Porcelain is defined as a ceramic material made by heating clay-type materials to high temperatures. It includes clay in the form of kaolinite and has been produced in China for more than 2000 years and in Korea for at least 1600 years, but was not developed in Japan up until the end of the 16th century.

Between 1592 and 1597, Japan, under the military rule of Toyotomi Hideyoshi invaded Korea two times with the intent to conquer both Korea and ultimately, China. Both invasions failed, but an estimated 400 potters and their families were kidnapped and taken to Japan to develop porcelain production, which up until then, was a closely guarded secret.

This large, wide-mouthed bean jar from the Yumino kiln in the Takeo area south of Karatsu, Japan, has a simplified pine tree sketched in iron and green and amber glazes over a brushed white slip. This type of stoneware was introduced to Japan by Korean potters around the end of the 16th century and very closely resembled Buncheong ceramics, a Korean porcelain. A similarly decorated bottle was exhibited in the Korean Buncheong Ceramics Exhibit from Leeum, Samsung Museum of Art and is shown as Catalogue 60 on page 109 of the exhibition book.  17/18th century

12.25 x 14 inches

31.1 x 35.6 cm 

$8500





More items related to: ,

Takeo Karatsu Bean Jar, Japan, Edo Period, 17th Century

Porcelain is defined as a ceramic material made by heating clay-type materials to high temperatures. It includes clay in the form of kaolinite and has been produced in China for more than 2000 years and in Korea for at least 1600 years, but was not developed in Japan up until the end of the 16th century.

Between 1592 and 1597, Japan, under the military rule of Toyotomi Hideyoshi invaded Korea two times with the intent to conquer both Korea and ultimately, China. Both invasions failed, but an estimated 400 potters and their families were kidnapped and taken to Japan to develop porcelain production, which up until then, was a closely guarded secret.

This large, wide-mouthed bean jar from the Yumino kiln in the Takeo area south of Karatsu, Japan, has a simplified pine tree sketched in iron and green and amber glazes over a brushed white slip. This type of stoneware was introduced to Japan by Korean potters around the end of the 16th century and very closely resembled Buncheong ceramics, a Korean porcelain. A similarly decorated bottle was exhibited in the Korean Buncheong Ceramics Exhibit from Leeum, Samsung Museum of Art and is shown as Catalogue 60 on page 109 of the exhibition book.  17/18th century

12.25 x 14 inches

31.1 x 35.6 cm 

$8500





More items related to: ,

Takeo Karatsu Bean Jar, Japan, Edo Period, 17th Century

Porcelain is defined as a ceramic material made by heating clay-type materials to high temperatures. It includes clay in the form of kaolinite and has been produced in China for more than 2000 years and in Korea for at least 1600 years, but was not developed in Japan up until the end of the 16th century.

Between 1592 and 1597, Japan, under the military rule of Toyotomi Hideyoshi invaded Korea two times with the intent to conquer both Korea and ultimately, China. Both invasions failed, but an estimated 400 potters and their families were kidnapped and taken to Japan to develop porcelain production, which up until then, was a closely guarded secret.

This large, wide-mouthed bean jar from the Yumino kiln in the Takeo area south of Karatsu, Japan, has a simplified pine tree sketched in iron and green and amber glazes over a brushed white slip. This type of stoneware was introduced to Japan by Korean potters around the end of the 16th century and very closely resembled Buncheong ceramics, a Korean porcelain. A similarly decorated bottle was exhibited in the Korean Buncheong Ceramics Exhibit from Leeum, Samsung Museum of Art and is shown as Catalogue 60 on page 109 of the exhibition book.  17/18th century

12.25 x 14 inches

31.1 x 35.6 cm 

$8500





More items related to: ,

Takeo Karatsu Bean Jar, Japan, Edo Period, 17th Century

Porcelain is defined as a ceramic material made by heating clay-type materials to high temperatures. It includes clay in the form of kaolinite and has been produced in China for more than 2000 years and in Korea for at least 1600 years, but was not developed in Japan up until the end of the 16th century.

Between 1592 and 1597, Japan, under the military rule of Toyotomi Hideyoshi invaded Korea two times with the intent to conquer both Korea and ultimately, China. Both invasions failed, but an estimated 400 potters and their families were kidnapped and taken to Japan to develop porcelain production, which up until then, was a closely guarded secret.

This large, wide-mouthed bean jar from the Yumino kiln in the Takeo area south of Karatsu, Japan, has a simplified pine tree sketched in iron and green and amber glazes over a brushed white slip. This type of stoneware was introduced to Japan by Korean potters around the end of the 16th century and very closely resembled Buncheong ceramics, a Korean porcelain. A similarly decorated bottle was exhibited in the Korean Buncheong Ceramics Exhibit from Leeum, Samsung Museum of Art and is shown as Catalogue 60 on page 109 of the exhibition book.  17/18th century

12.25 x 14 inches

31.1 x 35.6 cm 

$8500





More items related to: ,

Takeo Karatsu Bean Jar, Japan, Edo Period, 17th Century

Porcelain is defined as a ceramic material made by heating clay-type materials to high temperatures. It includes clay in the form of kaolinite and has been produced in China for more than 2000 years and in Korea for at least 1600 years, but was not developed in Japan up until the end of the 16th century.

Between 1592 and 1597, Japan, under the military rule of Toyotomi Hideyoshi invaded Korea two times with the intent to conquer both Korea and ultimately, China. Both invasions failed, but an estimated 400 potters and their families were kidnapped and taken to Japan to develop porcelain production, which up until then, was a closely guarded secret.

This large, wide-mouthed bean jar from the Yumino kiln in the Takeo area south of Karatsu, Japan, has a simplified pine tree sketched in iron and green and amber glazes over a brushed white slip. This type of stoneware was introduced to Japan by Korean potters around the end of the 16th century and very closely resembled Buncheong ceramics, a Korean porcelain. A similarly decorated bottle was exhibited in the Korean Buncheong Ceramics Exhibit from Leeum, Samsung Museum of Art and is shown as Catalogue 60 on page 109 of the exhibition book.  17/18th century

12.25 x 14 inches

31.1 x 35.6 cm 

$8500





More items related to: ,

Takeo Karatsu Bean Jar, Japan, Edo Period, 17th Century

Porcelain is defined as a ceramic material made by heating clay-type materials to high temperatures. It includes clay in the form of kaolinite and has been produced in China for more than 2000 years and in Korea for at least 1600 years, but was not developed in Japan up until the end of the 16th century.

Between 1592 and 1597, Japan, under the military rule of Toyotomi Hideyoshi invaded Korea two times with the intent to conquer both Korea and ultimately, China. Both invasions failed, but an estimated 400 potters and their families were kidnapped and taken to Japan to develop porcelain production, which up until then, was a closely guarded secret.

This large, wide-mouthed bean jar from the Yumino kiln in the Takeo area south of Karatsu, Japan, has a simplified pine tree sketched in iron and green and amber glazes over a brushed white slip. This type of stoneware was introduced to Japan by Korean potters around the end of the 16th century and very closely resembled Buncheong ceramics, a Korean porcelain. A similarly decorated bottle was exhibited in the Korean Buncheong Ceramics Exhibit from Leeum, Samsung Museum of Art and is shown as Catalogue 60 on page 109 of the exhibition book.  17/18th century

12.25 x 14 inches

31.1 x 35.6 cm 

$8500





More items related to: ,

Takeo Karatsu Bean Jar, Japan, Edo Period, 17th Century

Porcelain is defined as a ceramic material made by heating clay-type materials to high temperatures. It includes clay in the form of kaolinite and has been produced in China for more than 2000 years and in Korea for at least 1600 years, but was not developed in Japan up until the end of the 16th century.

Between 1592 and 1597, Japan, under the military rule of Toyotomi Hideyoshi invaded Korea two times with the intent to conquer both Korea and ultimately, China. Both invasions failed, but an estimated 400 potters and their families were kidnapped and taken to Japan to develop porcelain production, which up until then, was a closely guarded secret.

This large, wide-mouthed bean jar from the Yumino kiln in the Takeo area south of Karatsu, Japan, has a simplified pine tree sketched in iron and green and amber glazes over a brushed white slip. This type of stoneware was introduced to Japan by Korean potters around the end of the 16th century and very closely resembled Buncheong ceramics, a Korean porcelain. A similarly decorated bottle was exhibited in the Korean Buncheong Ceramics Exhibit from Leeum, Samsung Museum of Art and is shown as Catalogue 60 on page 109 of the exhibition book.  17/18th century

12.25 x 14 inches

31.1 x 35.6 cm 

$8500





More items related to: ,

Takeo Karatsu Bean Jar, Japan, Edo Period, 17th Century

Porcelain is defined as a ceramic material made by heating clay-type materials to high temperatures. It includes clay in the form of kaolinite and has been produced in China for more than 2000 years and in Korea for at least 1600 years, but was not developed in Japan up until the end of the 16th century.

Between 1592 and 1597, Japan, under the military rule of Toyotomi Hideyoshi invaded Korea two times with the intent to conquer both Korea and ultimately, China. Both invasions failed, but an estimated 400 potters and their families were kidnapped and taken to Japan to develop porcelain production, which up until then, was a closely guarded secret.

This large, wide-mouthed bean jar from the Yumino kiln in the Takeo area south of Karatsu, Japan, has a simplified pine tree sketched in iron and green and amber glazes over a brushed white slip. This type of stoneware was introduced to Japan by Korean potters around the end of the 16th century and very closely resembled Buncheong ceramics, a Korean porcelain. A similarly decorated bottle was exhibited in the Korean Buncheong Ceramics Exhibit from Leeum, Samsung Museum of Art and is shown as Catalogue 60 on page 109 of the exhibition book.  17/18th century

12.25 x 14 inches

31.1 x 35.6 cm 

$8500





More items related to: ,

Takeo Karatsu Bean Jar, Japan, Edo Period, 17th Century

Porcelain is defined as a ceramic material made by heating clay-type materials to high temperatures. It includes clay in the form of kaolinite and has been produced in China for more than 2000 years and in Korea for at least 1600 years, but was not developed in Japan up until the end of the 16th century.

Between 1592 and 1597, Japan, under the military rule of Toyotomi Hideyoshi invaded Korea two times with the intent to conquer both Korea and ultimately, China. Both invasions failed, but an estimated 400 potters and their families were kidnapped and taken to Japan to develop porcelain production, which up until then, was a closely guarded secret.

This large, wide-mouthed bean jar from the Yumino kiln in the Takeo area south of Karatsu, Japan, has a simplified pine tree sketched in iron and green and amber glazes over a brushed white slip. This type of stoneware was introduced to Japan by Korean potters around the end of the 16th century and very closely resembled Buncheong ceramics, a Korean porcelain. A similarly decorated bottle was exhibited in the Korean Buncheong Ceramics Exhibit from Leeum, Samsung Museum of Art and is shown as Catalogue 60 on page 109 of the exhibition book.  17/18th century

12.25 x 14 inches

31.1 x 35.6 cm 

$8500





More items related to: ,

Takeo Karatsu Bean Jar, Japan, Edo Period, 17th Century

Porcelain is defined as a ceramic material made by heating clay-type materials to high temperatures. It includes clay in the form of kaolinite and has been produced in China for more than 2000 years and in Korea for at least 1600 years, but was not developed in Japan up until the end of the 16th century.

Between 1592 and 1597, Japan, under the military rule of Toyotomi Hideyoshi invaded Korea two times with the intent to conquer both Korea and ultimately, China. Both invasions failed, but an estimated 400 potters and their families were kidnapped and taken to Japan to develop porcelain production, which up until then, was a closely guarded secret.

This large, wide-mouthed bean jar from the Yumino kiln in the Takeo area south of Karatsu, Japan, has a simplified pine tree sketched in iron and green and amber glazes over a brushed white slip. This type of stoneware was introduced to Japan by Korean potters around the end of the 16th century and very closely resembled Buncheong ceramics, a Korean porcelain. A similarly decorated bottle was exhibited in the Korean Buncheong Ceramics Exhibit from Leeum, Samsung Museum of Art and is shown as Catalogue 60 on page 109 of the exhibition book.  17/18th century

12.25 x 14 inches

31.1 x 35.6 cm 

$8500





More items related to: ,

Takeo Karatsu Bean Jar, Japan, Edo Period, 17th Century

Porcelain is defined as a ceramic material made by heating clay-type materials to high temperatures. It includes clay in the form of kaolinite and has been produced in China for more than 2000 years and in Korea for at least 1600 years, but was not developed in Japan up until the end of the 16th century.

Between 1592 and 1597, Japan, under the military rule of Toyotomi Hideyoshi invaded Korea two times with the intent to conquer both Korea and ultimately, China. Both invasions failed, but an estimated 400 potters and their families were kidnapped and taken to Japan to develop porcelain production, which up until then, was a closely guarded secret.

This large, wide-mouthed bean jar from the Yumino kiln in the Takeo area south of Karatsu, Japan, has a simplified pine tree sketched in iron and green and amber glazes over a brushed white slip. This type of stoneware was introduced to Japan by Korean potters around the end of the 16th century and very closely resembled Buncheong ceramics, a Korean porcelain. A similarly decorated bottle was exhibited in the Korean Buncheong Ceramics Exhibit from Leeum, Samsung Museum of Art and is shown as Catalogue 60 on page 109 of the exhibition book.  17/18th century

12.25 x 14 inches

31.1 x 35.6 cm 

$8500





More items related to: ,

Takeo Karatsu Bean Jar, Japan, Edo Period, 17th Century

Porcelain is defined as a ceramic material made by heating clay-type materials to high temperatures. It includes clay in the form of kaolinite and has been produced in China for more than 2000 years and in Korea for at least 1600 years, but was not developed in Japan up until the end of the 16th century.

Between 1592 and 1597, Japan, under the military rule of Toyotomi Hideyoshi invaded Korea two times with the intent to conquer both Korea and ultimately, China. Both invasions failed, but an estimated 400 potters and their families were kidnapped and taken to Japan to develop porcelain production, which up until then, was a closely guarded secret.

This large, wide-mouthed bean jar from the Yumino kiln in the Takeo area south of Karatsu, Japan, has a simplified pine tree sketched in iron and green and amber glazes over a brushed white slip. This type of stoneware was introduced to Japan by Korean potters around the end of the 16th century and very closely resembled Buncheong ceramics, a Korean porcelain. A similarly decorated bottle was exhibited in the Korean Buncheong Ceramics Exhibit from Leeum, Samsung Museum of Art and is shown as Catalogue 60 on page 109 of the exhibition book.  17/18th century

12.25 x 14 inches

31.1 x 35.6 cm 

$8500





More items related to: ,

Takeo Karatsu Bean Jar, Japan, Edo Period, 17th Century

Porcelain is defined as a ceramic material made by heating clay-type materials to high temperatures. It includes clay in the form of kaolinite and has been produced in China for more than 2000 years and in Korea for at least 1600 years, but was not developed in Japan up until the end of the 16th century.

Between 1592 and 1597, Japan, under the military rule of Toyotomi Hideyoshi invaded Korea two times with the intent to conquer both Korea and ultimately, China. Both invasions failed, but an estimated 400 potters and their families were kidnapped and taken to Japan to develop porcelain production, which up until then, was a closely guarded secret.

This large, wide-mouthed bean jar from the Yumino kiln in the Takeo area south of Karatsu, Japan, has a simplified pine tree sketched in iron and green and amber glazes over a brushed white slip. This type of stoneware was introduced to Japan by Korean potters around the end of the 16th century and very closely resembled Buncheong ceramics, a Korean porcelain. A similarly decorated bottle was exhibited in the Korean Buncheong Ceramics Exhibit from Leeum, Samsung Museum of Art and is shown as Catalogue 60 on page 109 of the exhibition book.  17/18th century

12.25 x 14 inches

31.1 x 35.6 cm 

$8500





More items related to: ,

Takeo Karatsu Bean Jar, Japan, Edo Period, 17th Century

Porcelain is defined as a ceramic material made by heating clay-type materials to high temperatures. It includes clay in the form of kaolinite and has been produced in China for more than 2000 years and in Korea for at least 1600 years, but was not developed in Japan up until the end of the 16th century.

Between 1592 and 1597, Japan, under the military rule of Toyotomi Hideyoshi invaded Korea two times with the intent to conquer both Korea and ultimately, China. Both invasions failed, but an estimated 400 potters and their families were kidnapped and taken to Japan to develop porcelain production, which up until then, was a closely guarded secret.

This large, wide-mouthed bean jar from the Yumino kiln in the Takeo area south of Karatsu, Japan, has a simplified pine tree sketched in iron and green and amber glazes over a brushed white slip. This type of stoneware was introduced to Japan by Korean potters around the end of the 16th century and very closely resembled Buncheong ceramics, a Korean porcelain. A similarly decorated bottle was exhibited in the Korean Buncheong Ceramics Exhibit from Leeum, Samsung Museum of Art and is shown as Catalogue 60 on page 109 of the exhibition book.  17/18th century

12.25 x 14 inches

31.1 x 35.6 cm 

$8500





More items related to: ,

Takeo Karatsu Bean Jar, Japan, Edo Period, 17th Century

Porcelain is defined as a ceramic material made by heating clay-type materials to high temperatures. It includes clay in the form of kaolinite and has been produced in China for more than 2000 years and in Korea for at least 1600 years, but was not developed in Japan up until the end of the 16th century.

Between 1592 and 1597, Japan, under the military rule of Toyotomi Hideyoshi invaded Korea two times with the intent to conquer both Korea and ultimately, China. Both invasions failed, but an estimated 400 potters and their families were kidnapped and taken to Japan to develop porcelain production, which up until then, was a closely guarded secret.

This large, wide-mouthed bean jar from the Yumino kiln in the Takeo area south of Karatsu, Japan, has a simplified pine tree sketched in iron and green and amber glazes over a brushed white slip. This type of stoneware was introduced to Japan by Korean potters around the end of the 16th century and very closely resembled Buncheong ceramics, a Korean porcelain. A similarly decorated bottle was exhibited in the Korean Buncheong Ceramics Exhibit from Leeum, Samsung Museum of Art and is shown as Catalogue 60 on page 109 of the exhibition book.  17/18th century

12.25 x 14 inches

31.1 x 35.6 cm 

$8500





More items related to: ,

Takeo Karatsu Bean Jar, Japan, Edo Period, 17th Century

Porcelain is defined as a ceramic material made by heating clay-type materials to high temperatures. It includes clay in the form of kaolinite and has been produced in China for more than 2000 years and in Korea for at least 1600 years, but was not developed in Japan up until the end of the 16th century.

Between 1592 and 1597, Japan, under the military rule of Toyotomi Hideyoshi invaded Korea two times with the intent to conquer both Korea and ultimately, China. Both invasions failed, but an estimated 400 potters and their families were kidnapped and taken to Japan to develop porcelain production, which up until then, was a closely guarded secret.

This large, wide-mouthed bean jar from the Yumino kiln in the Takeo area south of Karatsu, Japan, has a simplified pine tree sketched in iron and green and amber glazes over a brushed white slip. This type of stoneware was introduced to Japan by Korean potters around the end of the 16th century and very closely resembled Buncheong ceramics, a Korean porcelain. A similarly decorated bottle was exhibited in the Korean Buncheong Ceramics Exhibit from Leeum, Samsung Museum of Art and is shown as Catalogue 60 on page 109 of the exhibition book.  17/18th century

12.25 x 14 inches

31.1 x 35.6 cm 

$8500





More items related to: ,

Takeo Karatsu Bean Jar, Japan, Edo Period, 17th Century

Porcelain is defined as a ceramic material made by heating clay-type materials to high temperatures. It includes clay in the form of kaolinite and has been produced in China for more than 2000 years and in Korea for at least 1600 years, but was not developed in Japan up until the end of the 16th century.

Between 1592 and 1597, Japan, under the military rule of Toyotomi Hideyoshi invaded Korea two times with the intent to conquer both Korea and ultimately, China. Both invasions failed, but an estimated 400 potters and their families were kidnapped and taken to Japan to develop porcelain production, which up until then, was a closely guarded secret.

This large, wide-mouthed bean jar from the Yumino kiln in the Takeo area south of Karatsu, Japan, has a simplified pine tree sketched in iron and green and amber glazes over a brushed white slip. This type of stoneware was introduced to Japan by Korean potters around the end of the 16th century and very closely resembled Buncheong ceramics, a Korean porcelain. A similarly decorated bottle was exhibited in the Korean Buncheong Ceramics Exhibit from Leeum, Samsung Museum of Art and is shown as Catalogue 60 on page 109 of the exhibition book.  17/18th century

12.25 x 14 inches

31.1 x 35.6 cm 

$8500





More items related to: ,

Takeo Karatsu Bean Jar, Japan, Edo Period, 17th Century

Porcelain is defined as a ceramic material made by heating clay-type materials to high temperatures. It includes clay in the form of kaolinite and has been produced in China for more than 2000 years and in Korea for at least 1600 years, but was not developed in Japan up until the end of the 16th century.

Between 1592 and 1597, Japan, under the military rule of Toyotomi Hideyoshi invaded Korea two times with the intent to conquer both Korea and ultimately, China. Both invasions failed, but an estimated 400 potters and their families were kidnapped and taken to Japan to develop porcelain production, which up until then, was a closely guarded secret.

This large, wide-mouthed bean jar from the Yumino kiln in the Takeo area south of Karatsu, Japan, has a simplified pine tree sketched in iron and green and amber glazes over a brushed white slip. This type of stoneware was introduced to Japan by Korean potters around the end of the 16th century and very closely resembled Buncheong ceramics, a Korean porcelain. A similarly decorated bottle was exhibited in the Korean Buncheong Ceramics Exhibit from Leeum, Samsung Museum of Art and is shown as Catalogue 60 on page 109 of the exhibition book.  17/18th century

12.25 x 14 inches

31.1 x 35.6 cm 

$8500





More items related to: ,

Takeo Karatsu Bean Jar, Japan, Edo Period, 17th Century

Porcelain is defined as a ceramic material made by heating clay-type materials to high temperatures. It includes clay in the form of kaolinite and has been produced in China for more than 2000 years and in Korea for at least 1600 years, but was not developed in Japan up until the end of the 16th century.

Between 1592 and 1597, Japan, under the military rule of Toyotomi Hideyoshi invaded Korea two times with the intent to conquer both Korea and ultimately, China. Both invasions failed, but an estimated 400 potters and their families were kidnapped and taken to Japan to develop porcelain production, which up until then, was a closely guarded secret.

This large, wide-mouthed bean jar from the Yumino kiln in the Takeo area south of Karatsu, Japan, has a simplified pine tree sketched in iron and green and amber glazes over a brushed white slip. This type of stoneware was introduced to Japan by Korean potters around the end of the 16th century and very closely resembled Buncheong ceramics, a Korean porcelain. A similarly decorated bottle was exhibited in the Korean Buncheong Ceramics Exhibit from Leeum, Samsung Museum of Art and is shown as Catalogue 60 on page 109 of the exhibition book.  17/18th century

12.25 x 14 inches

31.1 x 35.6 cm 

$8500





More items related to: ,

Takeo Karatsu Bean Jar, Japan, Edo Period, 17th Century

Porcelain is defined as a ceramic material made by heating clay-type materials to high temperatures. It includes clay in the form of kaolinite and has been produced in China for more than 2000 years and in Korea for at least 1600 years, but was not developed in Japan up until the end of the 16th century.

Between 1592 and 1597, Japan, under the military rule of Toyotomi Hideyoshi invaded Korea two times with the intent to conquer both Korea and ultimately, China. Both invasions failed, but an estimated 400 potters and their families were kidnapped and taken to Japan to develop porcelain production, which up until then, was a closely guarded secret.

This large, wide-mouthed bean jar from the Yumino kiln in the Takeo area south of Karatsu, Japan, has a simplified pine tree sketched in iron and green and amber glazes over a brushed white slip. This type of stoneware was introduced to Japan by Korean potters around the end of the 16th century and very closely resembled Buncheong ceramics, a Korean porcelain. A similarly decorated bottle was exhibited in the Korean Buncheong Ceramics Exhibit from Leeum, Samsung Museum of Art and is shown as Catalogue 60 on page 109 of the exhibition book.  17/18th century

12.25 x 14 inches

31.1 x 35.6 cm 

$8500





More items related to: ,

Takeo Karatsu Bean Jar, Japan, Edo Period, 17th Century

Porcelain is defined as a ceramic material made by heating clay-type materials to high temperatures. It includes clay in the form of kaolinite and has been produced in China for more than 2000 years and in Korea for at least 1600 years, but was not developed in Japan up until the end of the 16th century.

Between 1592 and 1597, Japan, under the military rule of Toyotomi Hideyoshi invaded Korea two times with the intent to conquer both Korea and ultimately, China. Both invasions failed, but an estimated 400 potters and their families were kidnapped and taken to Japan to develop porcelain production, which up until then, was a closely guarded secret.

This large, wide-mouthed bean jar from the Yumino kiln in the Takeo area south of Karatsu, Japan, has a simplified pine tree sketched in iron and green and amber glazes over a brushed white slip. This type of stoneware was introduced to Japan by Korean potters around the end of the 16th century and very closely resembled Buncheong ceramics, a Korean porcelain. A similarly decorated bottle was exhibited in the Korean Buncheong Ceramics Exhibit from Leeum, Samsung Museum of Art and is shown as Catalogue 60 on page 109 of the exhibition book.  17/18th century

12.25 x 14 inches

31.1 x 35.6 cm 

$8500





More items related to: ,

Takeo Karatsu Bean Jar, Japan, Edo Period, 17th Century

Porcelain is defined as a ceramic material made by heating clay-type materials to high temperatures. It includes clay in the form of kaolinite and has been produced in China for more than 2000 years and in Korea for at least 1600 years, but was not developed in Japan up until the end of the 16th century.

Between 1592 and 1597, Japan, under the military rule of Toyotomi Hideyoshi invaded Korea two times with the intent to conquer both Korea and ultimately, China. Both invasions failed, but an estimated 400 potters and their families were kidnapped and taken to Japan to develop porcelain production, which up until then, was a closely guarded secret.

This large, wide-mouthed bean jar from the Yumino kiln in the Takeo area south of Karatsu, Japan, has a simplified pine tree sketched in iron and green and amber glazes over a brushed white slip. This type of stoneware was introduced to Japan by Korean potters around the end of the 16th century and very closely resembled Buncheong ceramics, a Korean porcelain. A similarly decorated bottle was exhibited in the Korean Buncheong Ceramics Exhibit from Leeum, Samsung Museum of Art and is shown as Catalogue 60 on page 109 of the exhibition book.  17/18th century

12.25 x 14 inches

31.1 x 35.6 cm 

$8500





More items related to: ,

Takeo Karatsu Bean Jar, Japan, Edo Period, 17th Century

Porcelain is defined as a ceramic material made by heating clay-type materials to high temperatures. It includes clay in the form of kaolinite and has been produced in China for more than 2000 years and in Korea for at least 1600 years, but was not developed in Japan up until the end of the 16th century.

Between 1592 and 1597, Japan, under the military rule of Toyotomi Hideyoshi invaded Korea two times with the intent to conquer both Korea and ultimately, China. Both invasions failed, but an estimated 400 potters and their families were kidnapped and taken to Japan to develop porcelain production, which up until then, was a closely guarded secret.

This large, wide-mouthed bean jar from the Yumino kiln in the Takeo area south of Karatsu, Japan, has a simplified pine tree sketched in iron and green and amber glazes over a brushed white slip. This type of stoneware was introduced to Japan by Korean potters around the end of the 16th century and very closely resembled Buncheong ceramics, a Korean porcelain. A similarly decorated bottle was exhibited in the Korean Buncheong Ceramics Exhibit from Leeum, Samsung Museum of Art and is shown as Catalogue 60 on page 109 of the exhibition book.  17/18th century

12.25 x 14 inches

31.1 x 35.6 cm 

$8500





More items related to: ,

Takeo Karatsu Bean Jar, Japan, Edo Period, 17th Century

Porcelain is defined as a ceramic material made by heating clay-type materials to high temperatures. It includes clay in the form of kaolinite and has been produced in China for more than 2000 years and in Korea for at least 1600 years, but was not developed in Japan up until the end of the 16th century.

Between 1592 and 1597, Japan, under the military rule of Toyotomi Hideyoshi invaded Korea two times with the intent to conquer both Korea and ultimately, China. Both invasions failed, but an estimated 400 potters and their families were kidnapped and taken to Japan to develop porcelain production, which up until then, was a closely guarded secret.

This large, wide-mouthed bean jar from the Yumino kiln in the Takeo area south of Karatsu, Japan, has a simplified pine tree sketched in iron and green and amber glazes over a brushed white slip. This type of stoneware was introduced to Japan by Korean potters around the end of the 16th century and very closely resembled Buncheong ceramics, a Korean porcelain. A similarly decorated bottle was exhibited in the Korean Buncheong Ceramics Exhibit from Leeum, Samsung Museum of Art and is shown as Catalogue 60 on page 109 of the exhibition book.  17/18th century

12.25 x 14 inches

31.1 x 35.6 cm 

$8500





More items related to: ,

Takeo Karatsu Bean Jar, Japan, Edo Period, 17th Century

Porcelain is defined as a ceramic material made by heating clay-type materials to high temperatures. It includes clay in the form of kaolinite and has been produced in China for more than 2000 years and in Korea for at least 1600 years, but was not developed in Japan up until the end of the 16th century.

Between 1592 and 1597, Japan, under the military rule of Toyotomi Hideyoshi invaded Korea two times with the intent to conquer both Korea and ultimately, China. Both invasions failed, but an estimated 400 potters and their families were kidnapped and taken to Japan to develop porcelain production, which up until then, was a closely guarded secret.

This large, wide-mouthed bean jar from the Yumino kiln in the Takeo area south of Karatsu, Japan, has a simplified pine tree sketched in iron and green and amber glazes over a brushed white slip. This type of stoneware was introduced to Japan by Korean potters around the end of the 16th century and very closely resembled Buncheong ceramics, a Korean porcelain. A similarly decorated bottle was exhibited in the Korean Buncheong Ceramics Exhibit from Leeum, Samsung Museum of Art and is shown as Catalogue 60 on page 109 of the exhibition book.  17/18th century

12.25 x 14 inches

31.1 x 35.6 cm 

$8500





More items related to: ,

Takeo Karatsu Bean Jar, Japan, Edo Period, 17th Century

Porcelain is defined as a ceramic material made by heating clay-type materials to high temperatures. It includes clay in the form of kaolinite and has been produced in China for more than 2000 years and in Korea for at least 1600 years, but was not developed in Japan up until the end of the 16th century.

Between 1592 and 1597, Japan, under the military rule of Toyotomi Hideyoshi invaded Korea two times with the intent to conquer both Korea and ultimately, China. Both invasions failed, but an estimated 400 potters and their families were kidnapped and taken to Japan to develop porcelain production, which up until then, was a closely guarded secret.

This large, wide-mouthed bean jar from the Yumino kiln in the Takeo area south of Karatsu, Japan, has a simplified pine tree sketched in iron and green and amber glazes over a brushed white slip. This type of stoneware was introduced to Japan by Korean potters around the end of the 16th century and very closely resembled Buncheong ceramics, a Korean porcelain. A similarly decorated bottle was exhibited in the Korean Buncheong Ceramics Exhibit from Leeum, Samsung Museum of Art and is shown as Catalogue 60 on page 109 of the exhibition book.  17/18th century

12.25 x 14 inches

31.1 x 35.6 cm 

$8500





More items related to: ,

Takeo Karatsu Bean Jar, Japan, Edo Period, 17th Century

Porcelain is defined as a ceramic material made by heating clay-type materials to high temperatures. It includes clay in the form of kaolinite and has been produced in China for more than 2000 years and in Korea for at least 1600 years, but was not developed in Japan up until the end of the 16th century.

Between 1592 and 1597, Japan, under the military rule of Toyotomi Hideyoshi invaded Korea two times with the intent to conquer both Korea and ultimately, China. Both invasions failed, but an estimated 400 potters and their families were kidnapped and taken to Japan to develop porcelain production, which up until then, was a closely guarded secret.

This large, wide-mouthed bean jar from the Yumino kiln in the Takeo area south of Karatsu, Japan, has a simplified pine tree sketched in iron and green and amber glazes over a brushed white slip. This type of stoneware was introduced to Japan by Korean potters around the end of the 16th century and very closely resembled Buncheong ceramics, a Korean porcelain. A similarly decorated bottle was exhibited in the Korean Buncheong Ceramics Exhibit from Leeum, Samsung Museum of Art and is shown as Catalogue 60 on page 109 of the exhibition book.  17/18th century

12.25 x 14 inches

31.1 x 35.6 cm 

$8500





More items related to: ,

Takeo Karatsu Bean Jar, Japan, Edo Period, 17th Century

Porcelain is defined as a ceramic material made by heating clay-type materials to high temperatures. It includes clay in the form of kaolinite and has been produced in China for more than 2000 years and in Korea for at least 1600 years, but was not developed in Japan up until the end of the 16th century.

Between 1592 and 1597, Japan, under the military rule of Toyotomi Hideyoshi invaded Korea two times with the intent to conquer both Korea and ultimately, China. Both invasions failed, but an estimated 400 potters and their families were kidnapped and taken to Japan to develop porcelain production, which up until then, was a closely guarded secret.

This large, wide-mouthed bean jar from the Yumino kiln in the Takeo area south of Karatsu, Japan, has a simplified pine tree sketched in iron and green and amber glazes over a brushed white slip. This type of stoneware was introduced to Japan by Korean potters around the end of the 16th century and very closely resembled Buncheong ceramics, a Korean porcelain. A similarly decorated bottle was exhibited in the Korean Buncheong Ceramics Exhibit from Leeum, Samsung Museum of Art and is shown as Catalogue 60 on page 109 of the exhibition book.  17/18th century

12.25 x 14 inches

31.1 x 35.6 cm 

$8500





More items related to: ,

Takeo Karatsu Bean Jar, Japan, Edo Period, 17th Century

Porcelain is defined as a ceramic material made by heating clay-type materials to high temperatures. It includes clay in the form of kaolinite and has been produced in China for more than 2000 years and in Korea for at least 1600 years, but was not developed in Japan up until the end of the 16th century.

Between 1592 and 1597, Japan, under the military rule of Toyotomi Hideyoshi invaded Korea two times with the intent to conquer both Korea and ultimately, China. Both invasions failed, but an estimated 400 potters and their families were kidnapped and taken to Japan to develop porcelain production, which up until then, was a closely guarded secret.

This large, wide-mouthed bean jar from the Yumino kiln in the Takeo area south of Karatsu, Japan, has a simplified pine tree sketched in iron and green and amber glazes over a brushed white slip. This type of stoneware was introduced to Japan by Korean potters around the end of the 16th century and very closely resembled Buncheong ceramics, a Korean porcelain. A similarly decorated bottle was exhibited in the Korean Buncheong Ceramics Exhibit from Leeum, Samsung Museum of Art and is shown as Catalogue 60 on page 109 of the exhibition book.  17/18th century

12.25 x 14 inches

31.1 x 35.6 cm 

$8500





More items related to: ,

Takeo Karatsu Bean Jar, Japan, Edo Period, 17th Century

Porcelain is defined as a ceramic material made by heating clay-type materials to high temperatures. It includes clay in the form of kaolinite and has been produced in China for more than 2000 years and in Korea for at least 1600 years, but was not developed in Japan up until the end of the 16th century.

Between 1592 and 1597, Japan, under the military rule of Toyotomi Hideyoshi invaded Korea two times with the intent to conquer both Korea and ultimately, China. Both invasions failed, but an estimated 400 potters and their families were kidnapped and taken to Japan to develop porcelain production, which up until then, was a closely guarded secret.

This large, wide-mouthed bean jar from the Yumino kiln in the Takeo area south of Karatsu, Japan, has a simplified pine tree sketched in iron and green and amber glazes over a brushed white slip. This type of stoneware was introduced to Japan by Korean potters around the end of the 16th century and very closely resembled Buncheong ceramics, a Korean porcelain. A similarly decorated bottle was exhibited in the Korean Buncheong Ceramics Exhibit from Leeum, Samsung Museum of Art and is shown as Catalogue 60 on page 109 of the exhibition book.  17/18th century

12.25 x 14 inches

31.1 x 35.6 cm 

$8500





More items related to: ,

Takeo Karatsu Bean Jar, Japan, Edo Period, 17th Century

Porcelain is defined as a ceramic material made by heating clay-type materials to high temperatures. It includes clay in the form of kaolinite and has been produced in China for more than 2000 years and in Korea for at least 1600 years, but was not developed in Japan up until the end of the 16th century.

Between 1592 and 1597, Japan, under the military rule of Toyotomi Hideyoshi invaded Korea two times with the intent to conquer both Korea and ultimately, China. Both invasions failed, but an estimated 400 potters and their families were kidnapped and taken to Japan to develop porcelain production, which up until then, was a closely guarded secret.

This large, wide-mouthed bean jar from the Yumino kiln in the Takeo area south of Karatsu, Japan, has a simplified pine tree sketched in iron and green and amber glazes over a brushed white slip. This type of stoneware was introduced to Japan by Korean potters around the end of the 16th century and very closely resembled Buncheong ceramics, a Korean porcelain. A similarly decorated bottle was exhibited in the Korean Buncheong Ceramics Exhibit from Leeum, Samsung Museum of Art and is shown as Catalogue 60 on page 109 of the exhibition book.  17/18th century

12.25 x 14 inches

31.1 x 35.6 cm 

$8500





More items related to: ,

Takeo Karatsu Bean Jar, Japan, Edo Period, 17th Century

Porcelain is defined as a ceramic material made by heating clay-type materials to high temperatures. It includes clay in the form of kaolinite and has been produced in China for more than 2000 years and in Korea for at least 1600 years, but was not developed in Japan up until the end of the 16th century.

Between 1592 and 1597, Japan, under the military rule of Toyotomi Hideyoshi invaded Korea two times with the intent to conquer both Korea and ultimately, China. Both invasions failed, but an estimated 400 potters and their families were kidnapped and taken to Japan to develop porcelain production, which up until then, was a closely guarded secret.

This large, wide-mouthed bean jar from the Yumino kiln in the Takeo area south of Karatsu, Japan, has a simplified pine tree sketched in iron and green and amber glazes over a brushed white slip. This type of stoneware was introduced to Japan by Korean potters around the end of the 16th century and very closely resembled Buncheong ceramics, a Korean porcelain. A similarly decorated bottle was exhibited in the Korean Buncheong Ceramics Exhibit from Leeum, Samsung Museum of Art and is shown as Catalogue 60 on page 109 of the exhibition book.  17/18th century

12.25 x 14 inches

31.1 x 35.6 cm 

$8500





More items related to: ,

Takeo Karatsu Bean Jar, Japan, Edo Period, 17th Century

Porcelain is defined as a ceramic material made by heating clay-type materials to high temperatures. It includes clay in the form of kaolinite and has been produced in China for more than 2000 years and in Korea for at least 1600 years, but was not developed in Japan up until the end of the 16th century.

Between 1592 and 1597, Japan, under the military rule of Toyotomi Hideyoshi invaded Korea two times with the intent to conquer both Korea and ultimately, China. Both invasions failed, but an estimated 400 potters and their families were kidnapped and taken to Japan to develop porcelain production, which up until then, was a closely guarded secret.

This large, wide-mouthed bean jar from the Yumino kiln in the Takeo area south of Karatsu, Japan, has a simplified pine tree sketched in iron and green and amber glazes over a brushed white slip. This type of stoneware was introduced to Japan by Korean potters around the end of the 16th century and very closely resembled Buncheong ceramics, a Korean porcelain. A similarly decorated bottle was exhibited in the Korean Buncheong Ceramics Exhibit from Leeum, Samsung Museum of Art and is shown as Catalogue 60 on page 109 of the exhibition book.  17/18th century

12.25 x 14 inches

31.1 x 35.6 cm 

$8500





More items related to: ,

Takeo Karatsu Bean Jar, Japan, Edo Period, 17th Century

Porcelain is defined as a ceramic material made by heating clay-type materials to high temperatures. It includes clay in the form of kaolinite and has been produced in China for more than 2000 years and in Korea for at least 1600 years, but was not developed in Japan up until the end of the 16th century.

Between 1592 and 1597, Japan, under the military rule of Toyotomi Hideyoshi invaded Korea two times with the intent to conquer both Korea and ultimately, China. Both invasions failed, but an estimated 400 potters and their families were kidnapped and taken to Japan to develop porcelain production, which up until then, was a closely guarded secret.

This large, wide-mouthed bean jar from the Yumino kiln in the Takeo area south of Karatsu, Japan, has a simplified pine tree sketched in iron and green and amber glazes over a brushed white slip. This type of stoneware was introduced to Japan by Korean potters around the end of the 16th century and very closely resembled Buncheong ceramics, a Korean porcelain. A similarly decorated bottle was exhibited in the Korean Buncheong Ceramics Exhibit from Leeum, Samsung Museum of Art and is shown as Catalogue 60 on page 109 of the exhibition book.  17/18th century

12.25 x 14 inches

31.1 x 35.6 cm 

$8500





More items related to: ,

Takeo Karatsu Bean Jar, Japan, Edo Period, 17th Century

Porcelain is defined as a ceramic material made by heating clay-type materials to high temperatures. It includes clay in the form of kaolinite and has been produced in China for more than 2000 years and in Korea for at least 1600 years, but was not developed in Japan up until the end of the 16th century.

Between 1592 and 1597, Japan, under the military rule of Toyotomi Hideyoshi invaded Korea two times with the intent to conquer both Korea and ultimately, China. Both invasions failed, but an estimated 400 potters and their families were kidnapped and taken to Japan to develop porcelain production, which up until then, was a closely guarded secret.

This large, wide-mouthed bean jar from the Yumino kiln in the Takeo area south of Karatsu, Japan, has a simplified pine tree sketched in iron and green and amber glazes over a brushed white slip. This type of stoneware was introduced to Japan by Korean potters around the end of the 16th century and very closely resembled Buncheong ceramics, a Korean porcelain. A similarly decorated bottle was exhibited in the Korean Buncheong Ceramics Exhibit from Leeum, Samsung Museum of Art and is shown as Catalogue 60 on page 109 of the exhibition book.  17/18th century

12.25 x 14 inches

31.1 x 35.6 cm 

$8500





More items related to: ,

Takeo Karatsu Bean Jar, Japan, Edo Period, 17th Century

Porcelain is defined as a ceramic material made by heating clay-type materials to high temperatures. It includes clay in the form of kaolinite and has been produced in China for more than 2000 years and in Korea for at least 1600 years, but was not developed in Japan up until the end of the 16th century.

Between 1592 and 1597, Japan, under the military rule of Toyotomi Hideyoshi invaded Korea two times with the intent to conquer both Korea and ultimately, China. Both invasions failed, but an estimated 400 potters and their families were kidnapped and taken to Japan to develop porcelain production, which up until then, was a closely guarded secret.

This large, wide-mouthed bean jar from the Yumino kiln in the Takeo area south of Karatsu, Japan, has a simplified pine tree sketched in iron and green and amber glazes over a brushed white slip. This type of stoneware was introduced to Japan by Korean potters around the end of the 16th century and very closely resembled Buncheong ceramics, a Korean porcelain. A similarly decorated bottle was exhibited in the Korean Buncheong Ceramics Exhibit from Leeum, Samsung Museum of Art and is shown as Catalogue 60 on page 109 of the exhibition book.  17/18th century

12.25 x 14 inches

31.1 x 35.6 cm 

$8500





More items related to: ,

Takeo Karatsu Bean Jar, Japan, Edo Period, 17th Century

Porcelain is defined as a ceramic material made by heating clay-type materials to high temperatures. It includes clay in the form of kaolinite and has been produced in China for more than 2000 years and in Korea for at least 1600 years, but was not developed in Japan up until the end of the 16th century.

Between 1592 and 1597, Japan, under the military rule of Toyotomi Hideyoshi invaded Korea two times with the intent to conquer both Korea and ultimately, China. Both invasions failed, but an estimated 400 potters and their families were kidnapped and taken to Japan to develop porcelain production, which up until then, was a closely guarded secret.

This large, wide-mouthed bean jar from the Yumino kiln in the Takeo area south of Karatsu, Japan, has a simplified pine tree sketched in iron and green and amber glazes over a brushed white slip. This type of stoneware was introduced to Japan by Korean potters around the end of the 16th century and very closely resembled Buncheong ceramics, a Korean porcelain. A similarly decorated bottle was exhibited in the Korean Buncheong Ceramics Exhibit from Leeum, Samsung Museum of Art and is shown as Catalogue 60 on page 109 of the exhibition book.  17/18th century

12.25 x 14 inches

31.1 x 35.6 cm 

$8500





More items related to: ,

Takeo Karatsu Bean Jar, Japan, Edo Period, 17th Century

Porcelain is defined as a ceramic material made by heating clay-type materials to high temperatures. It includes clay in the form of kaolinite and has been produced in China for more than 2000 years and in Korea for at least 1600 years, but was not developed in Japan up until the end of the 16th century.

Between 1592 and 1597, Japan, under the military rule of Toyotomi Hideyoshi invaded Korea two times with the intent to conquer both Korea and ultimately, China. Both invasions failed, but an estimated 400 potters and their families were kidnapped and taken to Japan to develop porcelain production, which up until then, was a closely guarded secret.

This large, wide-mouthed bean jar from the Yumino kiln in the Takeo area south of Karatsu, Japan, has a simplified pine tree sketched in iron and green and amber glazes over a brushed white slip. This type of stoneware was introduced to Japan by Korean potters around the end of the 16th century and very closely resembled Buncheong ceramics, a Korean porcelain. A similarly decorated bottle was exhibited in the Korean Buncheong Ceramics Exhibit from Leeum, Samsung Museum of Art and is shown as Catalogue 60 on page 109 of the exhibition book.  17/18th century

12.25 x 14 inches

31.1 x 35.6 cm 

$8500





More items related to: ,

Takeo Karatsu Bean Jar, Japan, Edo Period, 17th Century

Porcelain is defined as a ceramic material made by heating clay-type materials to high temperatures. It includes clay in the form of kaolinite and has been produced in China for more than 2000 years and in Korea for at least 1600 years, but was not developed in Japan up until the end of the 16th century.

Between 1592 and 1597, Japan, under the military rule of Toyotomi Hideyoshi invaded Korea two times with the intent to conquer both Korea and ultimately, China. Both invasions failed, but an estimated 400 potters and their families were kidnapped and taken to Japan to develop porcelain production, which up until then, was a closely guarded secret.

This large, wide-mouthed bean jar from the Yumino kiln in the Takeo area south of Karatsu, Japan, has a simplified pine tree sketched in iron and green and amber glazes over a brushed white slip. This type of stoneware was introduced to Japan by Korean potters around the end of the 16th century and very closely resembled Buncheong ceramics, a Korean porcelain. A similarly decorated bottle was exhibited in the Korean Buncheong Ceramics Exhibit from Leeum, Samsung Museum of Art and is shown as Catalogue 60 on page 109 of the exhibition book.  17/18th century