6-Tile Mural, Libyan Sibyl from Sistine Chapel

Michelangelo di Lodovico Buonarroti Simoni (1475-1564), universally known simply as Michelangelo, was arguably the greatest artist of all time. His sculpture of David is probably the most famous sculpture in the world and his frescoes on the ceiling of the Sistine Chapel are possibly man’s greatest achievement in the history of painting.

Despite his distaste for painting (he was a sculptor and considered painting to be less serious), he reluctantly accepted the commission of this arduous project from Pope Julius II in 1508. Painted between 1508 and 1512, the Sistine Chapel ceiling features 343 figures within more than 5000 square feet of painted ceiling.

Contrary to popular belief, Michelangelo did not paint the ceiling while laying on his back. Holes were drilled into the walls above the windows in the room from which brackets were placed to support a large flat scaffold on which he stood to paint. Even so, the work was physically demanding and Michelangelo wrote this amusing sonnet describing the results.
I’ve grown a goitre by dwelling in this den–
As cats from stagnant streams in Lombardy,
Or in what other land they hap to be–
Which drives the belly close beneath the chin:

My beard turns up to heaven; my nape falls in,
Fixed on my spine: my breast-bone visibly
Grows like a harp: a rich embroidery
Bedews my face from brush-drops thick and thin.

My loins into my paunch like levers grind:
My buttock like a crupper bears my weight;
My feet unguided wander to and fro;
In front my skin grows loose and long; behind,

By bending it becomes more taut and strait;
Crosswise I strain me like a Syrian bow:
Whence false and quaint, I know,
Must be the fruit of squinting brain and eye;

For ill can aim the gun that bends awry.
Come then, Giovanni, try
To succour my dead pictures and my fame;
Since foul I fare and painting is my shame.

This six-tile mural from the first half of the 20th century, depicts
Michelangelo’s magnificent Libyan Sibyl, Phemonoe, the daughter of Zeus and Poseidon’s daughter, Lamia. Phemonoe foretold the “coming of the day when that which is hidden shall be revealed”.

Each of the 6 tiles are 12″ x 12″, with the full image 36″ x 24″.  1st half, 20th century

I have also added a link to view the full ceiling.
https://upload.wikimedia.org/…/07/CAPPELLA_SISTINA_Ceiling.…

36 x 24 inches

91.44 x 60.96 cm

$3500


Copyright © 2017 The Scanlan Collection. All Rights Reserved.




More items related to: , , ,

6-Tile Mural, Libyan Sibyl from Sistine Chapel

Michelangelo di Lodovico Buonarroti Simoni (1475-1564), universally known simply as Michelangelo, was arguably the greatest artist of all time. His sculpture of David is probably the most famous sculpture in the world and his frescoes on the ceiling of the Sistine Chapel are possibly man’s greatest achievement in the history of painting.

Despite his distaste for painting (he was a sculptor and considered painting to be less serious), he reluctantly accepted the commission of this arduous project from Pope Julius II in 1508. Painted between 1508 and 1512, the Sistine Chapel ceiling features 343 figures within more than 5000 square feet of painted ceiling.

Contrary to popular belief, Michelangelo did not paint the ceiling while laying on his back. Holes were drilled into the walls above the windows in the room from which brackets were placed to support a large flat scaffold on which he stood to paint. Even so, the work was physically demanding and Michelangelo wrote this amusing sonnet describing the results.
I’ve grown a goitre by dwelling in this den–
As cats from stagnant streams in Lombardy,
Or in what other land they hap to be–
Which drives the belly close beneath the chin:

My beard turns up to heaven; my nape falls in,
Fixed on my spine: my breast-bone visibly
Grows like a harp: a rich embroidery
Bedews my face from brush-drops thick and thin.

My loins into my paunch like levers grind:
My buttock like a crupper bears my weight;
My feet unguided wander to and fro;
In front my skin grows loose and long; behind,

By bending it becomes more taut and strait;
Crosswise I strain me like a Syrian bow:
Whence false and quaint, I know,
Must be the fruit of squinting brain and eye;

For ill can aim the gun that bends awry.
Come then, Giovanni, try
To succour my dead pictures and my fame;
Since foul I fare and painting is my shame.

This six-tile mural from the first half of the 20th century, depicts
Michelangelo’s magnificent Libyan Sibyl, Phemonoe, the daughter of Zeus and Poseidon’s daughter, Lamia. Phemonoe foretold the “coming of the day when that which is hidden shall be revealed”.

Each of the 6 tiles are 12″ x 12″, with the full image 36″ x 24″.  1st half, 20th century

I have also added a link to view the full ceiling.
https://upload.wikimedia.org/…/07/CAPPELLA_SISTINA_Ceiling.…

36 x 24 inches

91.44 x 60.96 cm

$3500




More items related to: , , ,

6-Tile Mural, Libyan Sibyl from Sistine Chapel

Michelangelo di Lodovico Buonarroti Simoni (1475-1564), universally known simply as Michelangelo, was arguably the greatest artist of all time. His sculpture of David is probably the most famous sculpture in the world and his frescoes on the ceiling of the Sistine Chapel are possibly man’s greatest achievement in the history of painting.

Despite his distaste for painting (he was a sculptor and considered painting to be less serious), he reluctantly accepted the commission of this arduous project from Pope Julius II in 1508. Painted between 1508 and 1512, the Sistine Chapel ceiling features 343 figures within more than 5000 square feet of painted ceiling.

Contrary to popular belief, Michelangelo did not paint the ceiling while laying on his back. Holes were drilled into the walls above the windows in the room from which brackets were placed to support a large flat scaffold on which he stood to paint. Even so, the work was physically demanding and Michelangelo wrote this amusing sonnet describing the results.
I’ve grown a goitre by dwelling in this den–
As cats from stagnant streams in Lombardy,
Or in what other land they hap to be–
Which drives the belly close beneath the chin:

My beard turns up to heaven; my nape falls in,
Fixed on my spine: my breast-bone visibly
Grows like a harp: a rich embroidery
Bedews my face from brush-drops thick and thin.

My loins into my paunch like levers grind:
My buttock like a crupper bears my weight;
My feet unguided wander to and fro;
In front my skin grows loose and long; behind,

By bending it becomes more taut and strait;
Crosswise I strain me like a Syrian bow:
Whence false and quaint, I know,
Must be the fruit of squinting brain and eye;

For ill can aim the gun that bends awry.
Come then, Giovanni, try
To succour my dead pictures and my fame;
Since foul I fare and painting is my shame.

This six-tile mural from the first half of the 20th century, depicts
Michelangelo’s magnificent Libyan Sibyl, Phemonoe, the daughter of Zeus and Poseidon’s daughter, Lamia. Phemonoe foretold the “coming of the day when that which is hidden shall be revealed”.

Each of the 6 tiles are 12″ x 12″, with the full image 36″ x 24″.  1st half, 20th century

I have also added a link to view the full ceiling.
https://upload.wikimedia.org/…/07/CAPPELLA_SISTINA_Ceiling.…

36 x 24 inches

91.44 x 60.96 cm

$3500




More items related to: , , ,

6-Tile Mural, Libyan Sibyl from Sistine Chapel

Michelangelo di Lodovico Buonarroti Simoni (1475-1564), universally known simply as Michelangelo, was arguably the greatest artist of all time. His sculpture of David is probably the most famous sculpture in the world and his frescoes on the ceiling of the Sistine Chapel are possibly man’s greatest achievement in the history of painting.

Despite his distaste for painting (he was a sculptor and considered painting to be less serious), he reluctantly accepted the commission of this arduous project from Pope Julius II in 1508. Painted between 1508 and 1512, the Sistine Chapel ceiling features 343 figures within more than 5000 square feet of painted ceiling.

Contrary to popular belief, Michelangelo did not paint the ceiling while laying on his back. Holes were drilled into the walls above the windows in the room from which brackets were placed to support a large flat scaffold on which he stood to paint. Even so, the work was physically demanding and Michelangelo wrote this amusing sonnet describing the results.
I’ve grown a goitre by dwelling in this den–
As cats from stagnant streams in Lombardy,
Or in what other land they hap to be–
Which drives the belly close beneath the chin:

My beard turns up to heaven; my nape falls in,
Fixed on my spine: my breast-bone visibly
Grows like a harp: a rich embroidery
Bedews my face from brush-drops thick and thin.

My loins into my paunch like levers grind:
My buttock like a crupper bears my weight;
My feet unguided wander to and fro;
In front my skin grows loose and long; behind,

By bending it becomes more taut and strait;
Crosswise I strain me like a Syrian bow:
Whence false and quaint, I know,
Must be the fruit of squinting brain and eye;

For ill can aim the gun that bends awry.
Come then, Giovanni, try
To succour my dead pictures and my fame;
Since foul I fare and painting is my shame.

This six-tile mural from the first half of the 20th century, depicts
Michelangelo’s magnificent Libyan Sibyl, Phemonoe, the daughter of Zeus and Poseidon’s daughter, Lamia. Phemonoe foretold the “coming of the day when that which is hidden shall be revealed”.

Each of the 6 tiles are 12″ x 12″, with the full image 36″ x 24″.  1st half, 20th century

I have also added a link to view the full ceiling.
https://upload.wikimedia.org/…/07/CAPPELLA_SISTINA_Ceiling.…

36 x 24 inches

91.44 x 60.96 cm

$3500




More items related to: , , ,

6-Tile Mural, Libyan Sibyl from Sistine Chapel

Michelangelo di Lodovico Buonarroti Simoni (1475-1564), universally known simply as Michelangelo, was arguably the greatest artist of all time. His sculpture of David is probably the most famous sculpture in the world and his frescoes on the ceiling of the Sistine Chapel are possibly man’s greatest achievement in the history of painting.

Despite his distaste for painting (he was a sculptor and considered painting to be less serious), he reluctantly accepted the commission of this arduous project from Pope Julius II in 1508. Painted between 1508 and 1512, the Sistine Chapel ceiling features 343 figures within more than 5000 square feet of painted ceiling.

Contrary to popular belief, Michelangelo did not paint the ceiling while laying on his back. Holes were drilled into the walls above the windows in the room from which brackets were placed to support a large flat scaffold on which he stood to paint. Even so, the work was physically demanding and Michelangelo wrote this amusing sonnet describing the results.
I’ve grown a goitre by dwelling in this den–
As cats from stagnant streams in Lombardy,
Or in what other land they hap to be–
Which drives the belly close beneath the chin:

My beard turns up to heaven; my nape falls in,
Fixed on my spine: my breast-bone visibly
Grows like a harp: a rich embroidery
Bedews my face from brush-drops thick and thin.

My loins into my paunch like levers grind:
My buttock like a crupper bears my weight;
My feet unguided wander to and fro;
In front my skin grows loose and long; behind,

By bending it becomes more taut and strait;
Crosswise I strain me like a Syrian bow:
Whence false and quaint, I know,
Must be the fruit of squinting brain and eye;

For ill can aim the gun that bends awry.
Come then, Giovanni, try
To succour my dead pictures and my fame;
Since foul I fare and painting is my shame.

This six-tile mural from the first half of the 20th century, depicts
Michelangelo’s magnificent Libyan Sibyl, Phemonoe, the daughter of Zeus and Poseidon’s daughter, Lamia. Phemonoe foretold the “coming of the day when that which is hidden shall be revealed”.

Each of the 6 tiles are 12″ x 12″, with the full image 36″ x 24″.  1st half, 20th century

I have also added a link to view the full ceiling.
https://upload.wikimedia.org/…/07/CAPPELLA_SISTINA_Ceiling.…

36 x 24 inches

91.44 x 60.96 cm

$3500




More items related to: , , ,

6-Tile Mural, Libyan Sibyl from Sistine Chapel

Michelangelo di Lodovico Buonarroti Simoni (1475-1564), universally known simply as Michelangelo, was arguably the greatest artist of all time. His sculpture of David is probably the most famous sculpture in the world and his frescoes on the ceiling of the Sistine Chapel are possibly man’s greatest achievement in the history of painting.

Despite his distaste for painting (he was a sculptor and considered painting to be less serious), he reluctantly accepted the commission of this arduous project from Pope Julius II in 1508. Painted between 1508 and 1512, the Sistine Chapel ceiling features 343 figures within more than 5000 square feet of painted ceiling.

Contrary to popular belief, Michelangelo did not paint the ceiling while laying on his back. Holes were drilled into the walls above the windows in the room from which brackets were placed to support a large flat scaffold on which he stood to paint. Even so, the work was physically demanding and Michelangelo wrote this amusing sonnet describing the results.
I’ve grown a goitre by dwelling in this den–
As cats from stagnant streams in Lombardy,
Or in what other land they hap to be–
Which drives the belly close beneath the chin:

My beard turns up to heaven; my nape falls in,
Fixed on my spine: my breast-bone visibly
Grows like a harp: a rich embroidery
Bedews my face from brush-drops thick and thin.

My loins into my paunch like levers grind:
My buttock like a crupper bears my weight;
My feet unguided wander to and fro;
In front my skin grows loose and long; behind,

By bending it becomes more taut and strait;
Crosswise I strain me like a Syrian bow:
Whence false and quaint, I know,
Must be the fruit of squinting brain and eye;

For ill can aim the gun that bends awry.
Come then, Giovanni, try
To succour my dead pictures and my fame;
Since foul I fare and painting is my shame.

This six-tile mural from the first half of the 20th century, depicts
Michelangelo’s magnificent Libyan Sibyl, Phemonoe, the daughter of Zeus and Poseidon’s daughter, Lamia. Phemonoe foretold the “coming of the day when that which is hidden shall be revealed”.

Each of the 6 tiles are 12″ x 12″, with the full image 36″ x 24″.  1st half, 20th century

I have also added a link to view the full ceiling.
https://upload.wikimedia.org/…/07/CAPPELLA_SISTINA_Ceiling.…

36 x 24 inches

91.44 x 60.96 cm

$3500




More items related to: , , ,

6-Tile Mural, Libyan Sibyl from Sistine Chapel

Michelangelo di Lodovico Buonarroti Simoni (1475-1564), universally known simply as Michelangelo, was arguably the greatest artist of all time. His sculpture of David is probably the most famous sculpture in the world and his frescoes on the ceiling of the Sistine Chapel are possibly man’s greatest achievement in the history of painting.

Despite his distaste for painting (he was a sculptor and considered painting to be less serious), he reluctantly accepted the commission of this arduous project from Pope Julius II in 1508. Painted between 1508 and 1512, the Sistine Chapel ceiling features 343 figures within more than 5000 square feet of painted ceiling.

Contrary to popular belief, Michelangelo did not paint the ceiling while laying on his back. Holes were drilled into the walls above the windows in the room from which brackets were placed to support a large flat scaffold on which he stood to paint. Even so, the work was physically demanding and Michelangelo wrote this amusing sonnet describing the results.
I’ve grown a goitre by dwelling in this den–
As cats from stagnant streams in Lombardy,
Or in what other land they hap to be–
Which drives the belly close beneath the chin:

My beard turns up to heaven; my nape falls in,
Fixed on my spine: my breast-bone visibly
Grows like a harp: a rich embroidery
Bedews my face from brush-drops thick and thin.

My loins into my paunch like levers grind:
My buttock like a crupper bears my weight;
My feet unguided wander to and fro;
In front my skin grows loose and long; behind,

By bending it becomes more taut and strait;
Crosswise I strain me like a Syrian bow:
Whence false and quaint, I know,
Must be the fruit of squinting brain and eye;

For ill can aim the gun that bends awry.
Come then, Giovanni, try
To succour my dead pictures and my fame;
Since foul I fare and painting is my shame.

This six-tile mural from the first half of the 20th century, depicts
Michelangelo’s magnificent Libyan Sibyl, Phemonoe, the daughter of Zeus and Poseidon’s daughter, Lamia. Phemonoe foretold the “coming of the day when that which is hidden shall be revealed”.

Each of the 6 tiles are 12″ x 12″, with the full image 36″ x 24″.  1st half, 20th century

I have also added a link to view the full ceiling.
https://upload.wikimedia.org/…/07/CAPPELLA_SISTINA_Ceiling.…

36 x 24 inches

91.44 x 60.96 cm

$3500




More items related to: , , ,

6-Tile Mural, Libyan Sibyl from Sistine Chapel

Michelangelo di Lodovico Buonarroti Simoni (1475-1564), universally known simply as Michelangelo, was arguably the greatest artist of all time. His sculpture of David is probably the most famous sculpture in the world and his frescoes on the ceiling of the Sistine Chapel are possibly man’s greatest achievement in the history of painting.

Despite his distaste for painting (he was a sculptor and considered painting to be less serious), he reluctantly accepted the commission of this arduous project from Pope Julius II in 1508. Painted between 1508 and 1512, the Sistine Chapel ceiling features 343 figures within more than 5000 square feet of painted ceiling.

Contrary to popular belief, Michelangelo did not paint the ceiling while laying on his back. Holes were drilled into the walls above the windows in the room from which brackets were placed to support a large flat scaffold on which he stood to paint. Even so, the work was physically demanding and Michelangelo wrote this amusing sonnet describing the results.
I’ve grown a goitre by dwelling in this den–
As cats from stagnant streams in Lombardy,
Or in what other land they hap to be–
Which drives the belly close beneath the chin:

My beard turns up to heaven; my nape falls in,
Fixed on my spine: my breast-bone visibly
Grows like a harp: a rich embroidery
Bedews my face from brush-drops thick and thin.

My loins into my paunch like levers grind:
My buttock like a crupper bears my weight;
My feet unguided wander to and fro;
In front my skin grows loose and long; behind,

By bending it becomes more taut and strait;
Crosswise I strain me like a Syrian bow:
Whence false and quaint, I know,
Must be the fruit of squinting brain and eye;

For ill can aim the gun that bends awry.
Come then, Giovanni, try
To succour my dead pictures and my fame;
Since foul I fare and painting is my shame.

This six-tile mural from the first half of the 20th century, depicts
Michelangelo’s magnificent Libyan Sibyl, Phemonoe, the daughter of Zeus and Poseidon’s daughter, Lamia. Phemonoe foretold the “coming of the day when that which is hidden shall be revealed”.

Each of the 6 tiles are 12″ x 12″, with the full image 36″ x 24″.  1st half, 20th century

I have also added a link to view the full ceiling.
https://upload.wikimedia.org/…/07/CAPPELLA_SISTINA_Ceiling.…

36 x 24 inches

91.44 x 60.96 cm

$3500




More items related to: , , ,

6-Tile Mural, Libyan Sibyl from Sistine Chapel

Michelangelo di Lodovico Buonarroti Simoni (1475-1564), universally known simply as Michelangelo, was arguably the greatest artist of all time. His sculpture of David is probably the most famous sculpture in the world and his frescoes on the ceiling of the Sistine Chapel are possibly man’s greatest achievement in the history of painting.

Despite his distaste for painting (he was a sculptor and considered painting to be less serious), he reluctantly accepted the commission of this arduous project from Pope Julius II in 1508. Painted between 1508 and 1512, the Sistine Chapel ceiling features 343 figures within more than 5000 square feet of painted ceiling.

Contrary to popular belief, Michelangelo did not paint the ceiling while laying on his back. Holes were drilled into the walls above the windows in the room from which brackets were placed to support a large flat scaffold on which he stood to paint. Even so, the work was physically demanding and Michelangelo wrote this amusing sonnet describing the results.
I’ve grown a goitre by dwelling in this den–
As cats from stagnant streams in Lombardy,
Or in what other land they hap to be–
Which drives the belly close beneath the chin:

My beard turns up to heaven; my nape falls in,
Fixed on my spine: my breast-bone visibly
Grows like a harp: a rich embroidery
Bedews my face from brush-drops thick and thin.

My loins into my paunch like levers grind:
My buttock like a crupper bears my weight;
My feet unguided wander to and fro;
In front my skin grows loose and long; behind,

By bending it becomes more taut and strait;
Crosswise I strain me like a Syrian bow:
Whence false and quaint, I know,
Must be the fruit of squinting brain and eye;

For ill can aim the gun that bends awry.
Come then, Giovanni, try
To succour my dead pictures and my fame;
Since foul I fare and painting is my shame.

This six-tile mural from the first half of the 20th century, depicts
Michelangelo’s magnificent Libyan Sibyl, Phemonoe, the daughter of Zeus and Poseidon’s daughter, Lamia. Phemonoe foretold the “coming of the day when that which is hidden shall be revealed”.

Each of the 6 tiles are 12″ x 12″, with the full image 36″ x 24″.  1st half, 20th century

I have also added a link to view the full ceiling.
https://upload.wikimedia.org/…/07/CAPPELLA_SISTINA_Ceiling.…

36 x 24 inches

91.44 x 60.96 cm

$3500




More items related to: , , ,

6-Tile Mural, Libyan Sibyl from Sistine Chapel

Michelangelo di Lodovico Buonarroti Simoni (1475-1564), universally known simply as Michelangelo, was arguably the greatest artist of all time. His sculpture of David is probably the most famous sculpture in the world and his frescoes on the ceiling of the Sistine Chapel are possibly man’s greatest achievement in the history of painting.

Despite his distaste for painting (he was a sculptor and considered painting to be less serious), he reluctantly accepted the commission of this arduous project from Pope Julius II in 1508. Painted between 1508 and 1512, the Sistine Chapel ceiling features 343 figures within more than 5000 square feet of painted ceiling.

Contrary to popular belief, Michelangelo did not paint the ceiling while laying on his back. Holes were drilled into the walls above the windows in the room from which brackets were placed to support a large flat scaffold on which he stood to paint. Even so, the work was physically demanding and Michelangelo wrote this amusing sonnet describing the results.
I’ve grown a goitre by dwelling in this den–
As cats from stagnant streams in Lombardy,
Or in what other land they hap to be–
Which drives the belly close beneath the chin:

My beard turns up to heaven; my nape falls in,
Fixed on my spine: my breast-bone visibly
Grows like a harp: a rich embroidery
Bedews my face from brush-drops thick and thin.

My loins into my paunch like levers grind:
My buttock like a crupper bears my weight;
My feet unguided wander to and fro;
In front my skin grows loose and long; behind,

By bending it becomes more taut and strait;
Crosswise I strain me like a Syrian bow:
Whence false and quaint, I know,
Must be the fruit of squinting brain and eye;

For ill can aim the gun that bends awry.
Come then, Giovanni, try
To succour my dead pictures and my fame;
Since foul I fare and painting is my shame.

This six-tile mural from the first half of the 20th century, depicts
Michelangelo’s magnificent Libyan Sibyl, Phemonoe, the daughter of Zeus and Poseidon’s daughter, Lamia. Phemonoe foretold the “coming of the day when that which is hidden shall be revealed”.

Each of the 6 tiles are 12″ x 12″, with the full image 36″ x 24″.  1st half, 20th century

I have also added a link to view the full ceiling.
https://upload.wikimedia.org/…/07/CAPPELLA_SISTINA_Ceiling.…

36 x 24 inches

91.44 x 60.96 cm

$3500




More items related to: , , ,

6-Tile Mural, Libyan Sibyl from Sistine Chapel

Michelangelo di Lodovico Buonarroti Simoni (1475-1564), universally known simply as Michelangelo, was arguably the greatest artist of all time. His sculpture of David is probably the most famous sculpture in the world and his frescoes on the ceiling of the Sistine Chapel are possibly man’s greatest achievement in the history of painting.

Despite his distaste for painting (he was a sculptor and considered painting to be less serious), he reluctantly accepted the commission of this arduous project from Pope Julius II in 1508. Painted between 1508 and 1512, the Sistine Chapel ceiling features 343 figures within more than 5000 square feet of painted ceiling.

Contrary to popular belief, Michelangelo did not paint the ceiling while laying on his back. Holes were drilled into the walls above the windows in the room from which brackets were placed to support a large flat scaffold on which he stood to paint. Even so, the work was physically demanding and Michelangelo wrote this amusing sonnet describing the results.
I’ve grown a goitre by dwelling in this den–
As cats from stagnant streams in Lombardy,
Or in what other land they hap to be–
Which drives the belly close beneath the chin:

My beard turns up to heaven; my nape falls in,
Fixed on my spine: my breast-bone visibly
Grows like a harp: a rich embroidery
Bedews my face from brush-drops thick and thin.

My loins into my paunch like levers grind:
My buttock like a crupper bears my weight;
My feet unguided wander to and fro;
In front my skin grows loose and long; behind,

By bending it becomes more taut and strait;
Crosswise I strain me like a Syrian bow:
Whence false and quaint, I know,
Must be the fruit of squinting brain and eye;

For ill can aim the gun that bends awry.
Come then, Giovanni, try
To succour my dead pictures and my fame;
Since foul I fare and painting is my shame.

This six-tile mural from the first half of the 20th century, depicts
Michelangelo’s magnificent Libyan Sibyl, Phemonoe, the daughter of Zeus and Poseidon’s daughter, Lamia. Phemonoe foretold the “coming of the day when that which is hidden shall be revealed”.

Each of the 6 tiles are 12″ x 12″, with the full image 36″ x 24″.  1st half, 20th century

I have also added a link to view the full ceiling.
https://upload.wikimedia.org/…/07/CAPPELLA_SISTINA_Ceiling.…

36 x 24 inches

91.44 x 60.96 cm

$3500




More items related to: , , ,

6-Tile Mural, Libyan Sibyl from Sistine Chapel

Michelangelo di Lodovico Buonarroti Simoni (1475-1564), universally known simply as Michelangelo, was arguably the greatest artist of all time. His sculpture of David is probably the most famous sculpture in the world and his frescoes on the ceiling of the Sistine Chapel are possibly man’s greatest achievement in the history of painting.

Despite his distaste for painting (he was a sculptor and considered painting to be less serious), he reluctantly accepted the commission of this arduous project from Pope Julius II in 1508. Painted between 1508 and 1512, the Sistine Chapel ceiling features 343 figures within more than 5000 square feet of painted ceiling.

Contrary to popular belief, Michelangelo did not paint the ceiling while laying on his back. Holes were drilled into the walls above the windows in the room from which brackets were placed to support a large flat scaffold on which he stood to paint. Even so, the work was physically demanding and Michelangelo wrote this amusing sonnet describing the results.
I’ve grown a goitre by dwelling in this den–
As cats from stagnant streams in Lombardy,
Or in what other land they hap to be–
Which drives the belly close beneath the chin:

My beard turns up to heaven; my nape falls in,
Fixed on my spine: my breast-bone visibly
Grows like a harp: a rich embroidery
Bedews my face from brush-drops thick and thin.

My loins into my paunch like levers grind:
My buttock like a crupper bears my weight;
My feet unguided wander to and fro;
In front my skin grows loose and long; behind,

By bending it becomes more taut and strait;
Crosswise I strain me like a Syrian bow:
Whence false and quaint, I know,
Must be the fruit of squinting brain and eye;

For ill can aim the gun that bends awry.
Come then, Giovanni, try
To succour my dead pictures and my fame;
Since foul I fare and painting is my shame.

This six-tile mural from the first half of the 20th century, depicts
Michelangelo’s magnificent Libyan Sibyl, Phemonoe, the daughter of Zeus and Poseidon’s daughter, Lamia. Phemonoe foretold the “coming of the day when that which is hidden shall be revealed”.

Each of the 6 tiles are 12″ x 12″, with the full image 36″ x 24″.  1st half, 20th century

I have also added a link to view the full ceiling.
https://upload.wikimedia.org/…/07/CAPPELLA_SISTINA_Ceiling.…

36 x 24 inches

91.44 x 60.96 cm

$3500




More items related to: , , ,

6-Tile Mural, Libyan Sibyl from Sistine Chapel

Michelangelo di Lodovico Buonarroti Simoni (1475-1564), universally known simply as Michelangelo, was arguably the greatest artist of all time. His sculpture of David is probably the most famous sculpture in the world and his frescoes on the ceiling of the Sistine Chapel are possibly man’s greatest achievement in the history of painting.

Despite his distaste for painting (he was a sculptor and considered painting to be less serious), he reluctantly accepted the commission of this arduous project from Pope Julius II in 1508. Painted between 1508 and 1512, the Sistine Chapel ceiling features 343 figures within more than 5000 square feet of painted ceiling.

Contrary to popular belief, Michelangelo did not paint the ceiling while laying on his back. Holes were drilled into the walls above the windows in the room from which brackets were placed to support a large flat scaffold on which he stood to paint. Even so, the work was physically demanding and Michelangelo wrote this amusing sonnet describing the results.
I’ve grown a goitre by dwelling in this den–
As cats from stagnant streams in Lombardy,
Or in what other land they hap to be–
Which drives the belly close beneath the chin:

My beard turns up to heaven; my nape falls in,
Fixed on my spine: my breast-bone visibly
Grows like a harp: a rich embroidery
Bedews my face from brush-drops thick and thin.

My loins into my paunch like levers grind:
My buttock like a crupper bears my weight;
My feet unguided wander to and fro;
In front my skin grows loose and long; behind,

By bending it becomes more taut and strait;
Crosswise I strain me like a Syrian bow:
Whence false and quaint, I know,
Must be the fruit of squinting brain and eye;

For ill can aim the gun that bends awry.
Come then, Giovanni, try
To succour my dead pictures and my fame;
Since foul I fare and painting is my shame.

This six-tile mural from the first half of the 20th century, depicts
Michelangelo’s magnificent Libyan Sibyl, Phemonoe, the daughter of Zeus and Poseidon’s daughter, Lamia. Phemonoe foretold the “coming of the day when that which is hidden shall be revealed”.

Each of the 6 tiles are 12″ x 12″, with the full image 36″ x 24″.  1st half, 20th century

I have also added a link to view the full ceiling.
https://upload.wikimedia.org/…/07/CAPPELLA_SISTINA_Ceiling.…

36 x 24 inches

91.44 x 60.96 cm

$3500




More items related to: , , ,

6-Tile Mural, Libyan Sibyl from Sistine Chapel

Michelangelo di Lodovico Buonarroti Simoni (1475-1564), universally known simply as Michelangelo, was arguably the greatest artist of all time. His sculpture of David is probably the most famous sculpture in the world and his frescoes on the ceiling of the Sistine Chapel are possibly man’s greatest achievement in the history of painting.

Despite his distaste for painting (he was a sculptor and considered painting to be less serious), he reluctantly accepted the commission of this arduous project from Pope Julius II in 1508. Painted between 1508 and 1512, the Sistine Chapel ceiling features 343 figures within more than 5000 square feet of painted ceiling.

Contrary to popular belief, Michelangelo did not paint the ceiling while laying on his back. Holes were drilled into the walls above the windows in the room from which brackets were placed to support a large flat scaffold on which he stood to paint. Even so, the work was physically demanding and Michelangelo wrote this amusing sonnet describing the results.
I’ve grown a goitre by dwelling in this den–
As cats from stagnant streams in Lombardy,
Or in what other land they hap to be–
Which drives the belly close beneath the chin:

My beard turns up to heaven; my nape falls in,
Fixed on my spine: my breast-bone visibly
Grows like a harp: a rich embroidery
Bedews my face from brush-drops thick and thin.

My loins into my paunch like levers grind:
My buttock like a crupper bears my weight;
My feet unguided wander to and fro;
In front my skin grows loose and long; behind,

By bending it becomes more taut and strait;
Crosswise I strain me like a Syrian bow:
Whence false and quaint, I know,
Must be the fruit of squinting brain and eye;

For ill can aim the gun that bends awry.
Come then, Giovanni, try
To succour my dead pictures and my fame;
Since foul I fare and painting is my shame.

This six-tile mural from the first half of the 20th century, depicts
Michelangelo’s magnificent Libyan Sibyl, Phemonoe, the daughter of Zeus and Poseidon’s daughter, Lamia. Phemonoe foretold the “coming of the day when that which is hidden shall be revealed”.

Each of the 6 tiles are 12″ x 12″, with the full image 36″ x 24″.  1st half, 20th century

I have also added a link to view the full ceiling.
https://upload.wikimedia.org/…/07/CAPPELLA_SISTINA_Ceiling.…

36 x 24 inches

91.44 x 60.96 cm

$3500




More items related to: , , ,

6-Tile Mural, Libyan Sibyl from Sistine Chapel

Michelangelo di Lodovico Buonarroti Simoni (1475-1564), universally known simply as Michelangelo, was arguably the greatest artist of all time. His sculpture of David is probably the most famous sculpture in the world and his frescoes on the ceiling of the Sistine Chapel are possibly man’s greatest achievement in the history of painting.

Despite his distaste for painting (he was a sculptor and considered painting to be less serious), he reluctantly accepted the commission of this arduous project from Pope Julius II in 1508. Painted between 1508 and 1512, the Sistine Chapel ceiling features 343 figures within more than 5000 square feet of painted ceiling.

Contrary to popular belief, Michelangelo did not paint the ceiling while laying on his back. Holes were drilled into the walls above the windows in the room from which brackets were placed to support a large flat scaffold on which he stood to paint. Even so, the work was physically demanding and Michelangelo wrote this amusing sonnet describing the results.
I’ve grown a goitre by dwelling in this den–
As cats from stagnant streams in Lombardy,
Or in what other land they hap to be–
Which drives the belly close beneath the chin:

My beard turns up to heaven; my nape falls in,
Fixed on my spine: my breast-bone visibly
Grows like a harp: a rich embroidery
Bedews my face from brush-drops thick and thin.

My loins into my paunch like levers grind:
My buttock like a crupper bears my weight;
My feet unguided wander to and fro;
In front my skin grows loose and long; behind,

By bending it becomes more taut and strait;
Crosswise I strain me like a Syrian bow:
Whence false and quaint, I know,
Must be the fruit of squinting brain and eye;

For ill can aim the gun that bends awry.
Come then, Giovanni, try
To succour my dead pictures and my fame;
Since foul I fare and painting is my shame.

This six-tile mural from the first half of the 20th century, depicts
Michelangelo’s magnificent Libyan Sibyl, Phemonoe, the daughter of Zeus and Poseidon’s daughter, Lamia. Phemonoe foretold the “coming of the day when that which is hidden shall be revealed”.

Each of the 6 tiles are 12″ x 12″, with the full image 36″ x 24″.  1st half, 20th century

I have also added a link to view the full ceiling.
https://upload.wikimedia.org/…/07/CAPPELLA_SISTINA_Ceiling.…

36 x 24 inches

91.44 x 60.96 cm

$3500




More items related to: , , ,

6-Tile Mural, Libyan Sibyl from Sistine Chapel

Michelangelo di Lodovico Buonarroti Simoni (1475-1564), universally known simply as Michelangelo, was arguably the greatest artist of all time. His sculpture of David is probably the most famous sculpture in the world and his frescoes on the ceiling of the Sistine Chapel are possibly man’s greatest achievement in the history of painting.

Despite his distaste for painting (he was a sculptor and considered painting to be less serious), he reluctantly accepted the commission of this arduous project from Pope Julius II in 1508. Painted between 1508 and 1512, the Sistine Chapel ceiling features 343 figures within more than 5000 square feet of painted ceiling.

Contrary to popular belief, Michelangelo did not paint the ceiling while laying on his back. Holes were drilled into the walls above the windows in the room from which brackets were placed to support a large flat scaffold on which he stood to paint. Even so, the work was physically demanding and Michelangelo wrote this amusing sonnet describing the results.
I’ve grown a goitre by dwelling in this den–
As cats from stagnant streams in Lombardy,
Or in what other land they hap to be–
Which drives the belly close beneath the chin:

My beard turns up to heaven; my nape falls in,
Fixed on my spine: my breast-bone visibly
Grows like a harp: a rich embroidery
Bedews my face from brush-drops thick and thin.

My loins into my paunch like levers grind:
My buttock like a crupper bears my weight;
My feet unguided wander to and fro;
In front my skin grows loose and long; behind,

By bending it becomes more taut and strait;
Crosswise I strain me like a Syrian bow:
Whence false and quaint, I know,
Must be the fruit of squinting brain and eye;

For ill can aim the gun that bends awry.
Come then, Giovanni, try
To succour my dead pictures and my fame;
Since foul I fare and painting is my shame.

This six-tile mural from the first half of the 20th century, depicts
Michelangelo’s magnificent Libyan Sibyl, Phemonoe, the daughter of Zeus and Poseidon’s daughter, Lamia. Phemonoe foretold the “coming of the day when that which is hidden shall be revealed”.

Each of the 6 tiles are 12″ x 12″, with the full image 36″ x 24″.  1st half, 20th century

I have also added a link to view the full ceiling.
https://upload.wikimedia.org/…/07/CAPPELLA_SISTINA_Ceiling.…

36 x 24 inches

91.44 x 60.96 cm

$3500




More items related to: , , ,

6-Tile Mural, Libyan Sibyl from Sistine Chapel

Michelangelo di Lodovico Buonarroti Simoni (1475-1564), universally known simply as Michelangelo, was arguably the greatest artist of all time. His sculpture of David is probably the most famous sculpture in the world and his frescoes on the ceiling of the Sistine Chapel are possibly man’s greatest achievement in the history of painting.

Despite his distaste for painting (he was a sculptor and considered painting to be less serious), he reluctantly accepted the commission of this arduous project from Pope Julius II in 1508. Painted between 1508 and 1512, the Sistine Chapel ceiling features 343 figures within more than 5000 square feet of painted ceiling.

Contrary to popular belief, Michelangelo did not paint the ceiling while laying on his back. Holes were drilled into the walls above the windows in the room from which brackets were placed to support a large flat scaffold on which he stood to paint. Even so, the work was physically demanding and Michelangelo wrote this amusing sonnet describing the results.
I’ve grown a goitre by dwelling in this den–
As cats from stagnant streams in Lombardy,
Or in what other land they hap to be–
Which drives the belly close beneath the chin:

My beard turns up to heaven; my nape falls in,
Fixed on my spine: my breast-bone visibly
Grows like a harp: a rich embroidery
Bedews my face from brush-drops thick and thin.

My loins into my paunch like levers grind:
My buttock like a crupper bears my weight;
My feet unguided wander to and fro;
In front my skin grows loose and long; behind,

By bending it becomes more taut and strait;
Crosswise I strain me like a Syrian bow:
Whence false and quaint, I know,
Must be the fruit of squinting brain and eye;

For ill can aim the gun that bends awry.
Come then, Giovanni, try
To succour my dead pictures and my fame;
Since foul I fare and painting is my shame.

This six-tile mural from the first half of the 20th century, depicts
Michelangelo’s magnificent Libyan Sibyl, Phemonoe, the daughter of Zeus and Poseidon’s daughter, Lamia. Phemonoe foretold the “coming of the day when that which is hidden shall be revealed”.

Each of the 6 tiles are 12″ x 12″, with the full image 36″ x 24″.  1st half, 20th century

I have also added a link to view the full ceiling.
https://upload.wikimedia.org/…/07/CAPPELLA_SISTINA_Ceiling.…

36 x 24 inches

91.44 x 60.96 cm

$3500




More items related to: , , ,

6-Tile Mural, Libyan Sibyl from Sistine Chapel

Michelangelo di Lodovico Buonarroti Simoni (1475-1564), universally known simply as Michelangelo, was arguably the greatest artist of all time. His sculpture of David is probably the most famous sculpture in the world and his frescoes on the ceiling of the Sistine Chapel are possibly man’s greatest achievement in the history of painting.

Despite his distaste for painting (he was a sculptor and considered painting to be less serious), he reluctantly accepted the commission of this arduous project from Pope Julius II in 1508. Painted between 1508 and 1512, the Sistine Chapel ceiling features 343 figures within more than 5000 square feet of painted ceiling.

Contrary to popular belief, Michelangelo did not paint the ceiling while laying on his back. Holes were drilled into the walls above the windows in the room from which brackets were placed to support a large flat scaffold on which he stood to paint. Even so, the work was physically demanding and Michelangelo wrote this amusing sonnet describing the results.
I’ve grown a goitre by dwelling in this den–
As cats from stagnant streams in Lombardy,
Or in what other land they hap to be–
Which drives the belly close beneath the chin:

My beard turns up to heaven; my nape falls in,
Fixed on my spine: my breast-bone visibly
Grows like a harp: a rich embroidery
Bedews my face from brush-drops thick and thin.

My loins into my paunch like levers grind:
My buttock like a crupper bears my weight;
My feet unguided wander to and fro;
In front my skin grows loose and long; behind,

By bending it becomes more taut and strait;
Crosswise I strain me like a Syrian bow:
Whence false and quaint, I know,
Must be the fruit of squinting brain and eye;

For ill can aim the gun that bends awry.
Come then, Giovanni, try
To succour my dead pictures and my fame;
Since foul I fare and painting is my shame.

This six-tile mural from the first half of the 20th century, depicts
Michelangelo’s magnificent Libyan Sibyl, Phemonoe, the daughter of Zeus and Poseidon’s daughter, Lamia. Phemonoe foretold the “coming of the day when that which is hidden shall be revealed”.

Each of the 6 tiles are 12″ x 12″, with the full image 36″ x 24″.  1st half, 20th century

I have also added a link to view the full ceiling.
https://upload.wikimedia.org/…/07/CAPPELLA_SISTINA_Ceiling.…

36 x 24 inches

91.44 x 60.96 cm

$3500




More items related to: , , ,

6-Tile Mural, Libyan Sibyl from Sistine Chapel

Michelangelo di Lodovico Buonarroti Simoni (1475-1564), universally known simply as Michelangelo, was arguably the greatest artist of all time. His sculpture of David is probably the most famous sculpture in the world and his frescoes on the ceiling of the Sistine Chapel are possibly man’s greatest achievement in the history of painting.

Despite his distaste for painting (he was a sculptor and considered painting to be less serious), he reluctantly accepted the commission of this arduous project from Pope Julius II in 1508. Painted between 1508 and 1512, the Sistine Chapel ceiling features 343 figures within more than 5000 square feet of painted ceiling.

Contrary to popular belief, Michelangelo did not paint the ceiling while laying on his back. Holes were drilled into the walls above the windows in the room from which brackets were placed to support a large flat scaffold on which he stood to paint. Even so, the work was physically demanding and Michelangelo wrote this amusing sonnet describing the results.
I’ve grown a goitre by dwelling in this den–
As cats from stagnant streams in Lombardy,
Or in what other land they hap to be–
Which drives the belly close beneath the chin:

My beard turns up to heaven; my nape falls in,
Fixed on my spine: my breast-bone visibly
Grows like a harp: a rich embroidery
Bedews my face from brush-drops thick and thin.

My loins into my paunch like levers grind:
My buttock like a crupper bears my weight;
My feet unguided wander to and fro;
In front my skin grows loose and long; behind,

By bending it becomes more taut and strait;
Crosswise I strain me like a Syrian bow:
Whence false and quaint, I know,
Must be the fruit of squinting brain and eye;

For ill can aim the gun that bends awry.
Come then, Giovanni, try
To succour my dead pictures and my fame;
Since foul I fare and painting is my shame.

This six-tile mural from the first half of the 20th century, depicts
Michelangelo’s magnificent Libyan Sibyl, Phemonoe, the daughter of Zeus and Poseidon’s daughter, Lamia. Phemonoe foretold the “coming of the day when that which is hidden shall be revealed”.

Each of the 6 tiles are 12″ x 12″, with the full image 36″ x 24″.  1st half, 20th century

I have also added a link to view the full ceiling.
https://upload.wikimedia.org/…/07/CAPPELLA_SISTINA_Ceiling.…

36 x 24 inches

91.44 x 60.96 cm

$3500




More items related to: , , ,

6-Tile Mural, Libyan Sibyl from Sistine Chapel

Michelangelo di Lodovico Buonarroti Simoni (1475-1564), universally known simply as Michelangelo, was arguably the greatest artist of all time. His sculpture of David is probably the most famous sculpture in the world and his frescoes on the ceiling of the Sistine Chapel are possibly man’s greatest achievement in the history of painting.

Despite his distaste for painting (he was a sculptor and considered painting to be less serious), he reluctantly accepted the commission of this arduous project from Pope Julius II in 1508. Painted between 1508 and 1512, the Sistine Chapel ceiling features 343 figures within more than 5000 square feet of painted ceiling.

Contrary to popular belief, Michelangelo did not paint the ceiling while laying on his back. Holes were drilled into the walls above the windows in the room from which brackets were placed to support a large flat scaffold on which he stood to paint. Even so, the work was physically demanding and Michelangelo wrote this amusing sonnet describing the results.
I’ve grown a goitre by dwelling in this den–
As cats from stagnant streams in Lombardy,
Or in what other land they hap to be–
Which drives the belly close beneath the chin:

My beard turns up to heaven; my nape falls in,
Fixed on my spine: my breast-bone visibly
Grows like a harp: a rich embroidery
Bedews my face from brush-drops thick and thin.

My loins into my paunch like levers grind:
My buttock like a crupper bears my weight;
My feet unguided wander to and fro;
In front my skin grows loose and long; behind,

By bending it becomes more taut and strait;
Crosswise I strain me like a Syrian bow:
Whence false and quaint, I know,
Must be the fruit of squinting brain and eye;

For ill can aim the gun that bends awry.
Come then, Giovanni, try
To succour my dead pictures and my fame;
Since foul I fare and painting is my shame.

This six-tile mural from the first half of the 20th century, depicts
Michelangelo’s magnificent Libyan Sibyl, Phemonoe, the daughter of Zeus and Poseidon’s daughter, Lamia. Phemonoe foretold the “coming of the day when that which is hidden shall be revealed”.

Each of the 6 tiles are 12″ x 12″, with the full image 36″ x 24″.  1st half, 20th century

I have also added a link to view the full ceiling.
https://upload.wikimedia.org/…/07/CAPPELLA_SISTINA_Ceiling.…

36 x 24 inches

91.44 x 60.96 cm

$3500




More items related to: , , ,

6-Tile Mural, Libyan Sibyl from Sistine Chapel

Michelangelo di Lodovico Buonarroti Simoni (1475-1564), universally known simply as Michelangelo, was arguably the greatest artist of all time. His sculpture of David is probably the most famous sculpture in the world and his frescoes on the ceiling of the Sistine Chapel are possibly man’s greatest achievement in the history of painting.

Despite his distaste for painting (he was a sculptor and considered painting to be less serious), he reluctantly accepted the commission of this arduous project from Pope Julius II in 1508. Painted between 1508 and 1512, the Sistine Chapel ceiling features 343 figures within more than 5000 square feet of painted ceiling.

Contrary to popular belief, Michelangelo did not paint the ceiling while laying on his back. Holes were drilled into the walls above the windows in the room from which brackets were placed to support a large flat scaffold on which he stood to paint. Even so, the work was physically demanding and Michelangelo wrote this amusing sonnet describing the results.
I’ve grown a goitre by dwelling in this den–
As cats from stagnant streams in Lombardy,
Or in what other land they hap to be–
Which drives the belly close beneath the chin:

My beard turns up to heaven; my nape falls in,
Fixed on my spine: my breast-bone visibly
Grows like a harp: a rich embroidery
Bedews my face from brush-drops thick and thin.

My loins into my paunch like levers grind:
My buttock like a crupper bears my weight;
My feet unguided wander to and fro;
In front my skin grows loose and long; behind,

By bending it becomes more taut and strait;
Crosswise I strain me like a Syrian bow:
Whence false and quaint, I know,
Must be the fruit of squinting brain and eye;

For ill can aim the gun that bends awry.
Come then, Giovanni, try
To succour my dead pictures and my fame;
Since foul I fare and painting is my shame.

This six-tile mural from the first half of the 20th century, depicts
Michelangelo’s magnificent Libyan Sibyl, Phemonoe, the daughter of Zeus and Poseidon’s daughter, Lamia. Phemonoe foretold the “coming of the day when that which is hidden shall be revealed”.

Each of the 6 tiles are 12″ x 12″, with the full image 36″ x 24″.  1st half, 20th century

I have also added a link to view the full ceiling.
https://upload.wikimedia.org/…/07/CAPPELLA_SISTINA_Ceiling.…

36 x 24 inches

91.44 x 60.96 cm

$3500




More items related to: , , ,

6-Tile Mural, Libyan Sibyl from Sistine Chapel

Michelangelo di Lodovico Buonarroti Simoni (1475-1564), universally known simply as Michelangelo, was arguably the greatest artist of all time. His sculpture of David is probably the most famous sculpture in the world and his frescoes on the ceiling of the Sistine Chapel are possibly man’s greatest achievement in the history of painting.

Despite his distaste for painting (he was a sculptor and considered painting to be less serious), he reluctantly accepted the commission of this arduous project from Pope Julius II in 1508. Painted between 1508 and 1512, the Sistine Chapel ceiling features 343 figures within more than 5000 square feet of painted ceiling.

Contrary to popular belief, Michelangelo did not paint the ceiling while laying on his back. Holes were drilled into the walls above the windows in the room from which brackets were placed to support a large flat scaffold on which he stood to paint. Even so, the work was physically demanding and Michelangelo wrote this amusing sonnet describing the results.
I’ve grown a goitre by dwelling in this den–
As cats from stagnant streams in Lombardy,
Or in what other land they hap to be–
Which drives the belly close beneath the chin:

My beard turns up to heaven; my nape falls in,
Fixed on my spine: my breast-bone visibly
Grows like a harp: a rich embroidery
Bedews my face from brush-drops thick and thin.

My loins into my paunch like levers grind:
My buttock like a crupper bears my weight;
My feet unguided wander to and fro;
In front my skin grows loose and long; behind,

By bending it becomes more taut and strait;
Crosswise I strain me like a Syrian bow:
Whence false and quaint, I know,
Must be the fruit of squinting brain and eye;

For ill can aim the gun that bends awry.
Come then, Giovanni, try
To succour my dead pictures and my fame;
Since foul I fare and painting is my shame.

This six-tile mural from the first half of the 20th century, depicts
Michelangelo’s magnificent Libyan Sibyl, Phemonoe, the daughter of Zeus and Poseidon’s daughter, Lamia. Phemonoe foretold the “coming of the day when that which is hidden shall be revealed”.

Each of the 6 tiles are 12″ x 12″, with the full image 36″ x 24″.  1st half, 20th century

I have also added a link to view the full ceiling.
https://upload.wikimedia.org/…/07/CAPPELLA_SISTINA_Ceiling.…

36 x 24 inches

91.44 x 60.96 cm

$3500




More items related to: , , ,

6-Tile Mural, Libyan Sibyl from Sistine Chapel

Michelangelo di Lodovico Buonarroti Simoni (1475-1564), universally known simply as Michelangelo, was arguably the greatest artist of all time. His sculpture of David is probably the most famous sculpture in the world and his frescoes on the ceiling of the Sistine Chapel are possibly man’s greatest achievement in the history of painting.

Despite his distaste for painting (he was a sculptor and considered painting to be less serious), he reluctantly accepted the commission of this arduous project from Pope Julius II in 1508. Painted between 1508 and 1512, the Sistine Chapel ceiling features 343 figures within more than 5000 square feet of painted ceiling.

Contrary to popular belief, Michelangelo did not paint the ceiling while laying on his back. Holes were drilled into the walls above the windows in the room from which brackets were placed to support a large flat scaffold on which he stood to paint. Even so, the work was physically demanding and Michelangelo wrote this amusing sonnet describing the results.
I’ve grown a goitre by dwelling in this den–
As cats from stagnant streams in Lombardy,
Or in what other land they hap to be–
Which drives the belly close beneath the chin:

My beard turns up to heaven; my nape falls in,
Fixed on my spine: my breast-bone visibly
Grows like a harp: a rich embroidery
Bedews my face from brush-drops thick and thin.

My loins into my paunch like levers grind:
My buttock like a crupper bears my weight;
My feet unguided wander to and fro;
In front my skin grows loose and long; behind,

By bending it becomes more taut and strait;
Crosswise I strain me like a Syrian bow:
Whence false and quaint, I know,
Must be the fruit of squinting brain and eye;

For ill can aim the gun that bends awry.
Come then, Giovanni, try
To succour my dead pictures and my fame;
Since foul I fare and painting is my shame.

This six-tile mural from the first half of the 20th century, depicts
Michelangelo’s magnificent Libyan Sibyl, Phemonoe, the daughter of Zeus and Poseidon’s daughter, Lamia. Phemonoe foretold the “coming of the day when that which is hidden shall be revealed”.

Each of the 6 tiles are 12″ x 12″, with the full image 36″ x 24″.  1st half, 20th century

I have also added a link to view the full ceiling.
https://upload.wikimedia.org/…/07/CAPPELLA_SISTINA_Ceiling.…

36 x 24 inches

91.44 x 60.96 cm

$3500




More items related to: , , ,

6-Tile Mural, Libyan Sibyl from Sistine Chapel

Michelangelo di Lodovico Buonarroti Simoni (1475-1564), universally known simply as Michelangelo, was arguably the greatest artist of all time. His sculpture of David is probably the most famous sculpture in the world and his frescoes on the ceiling of the Sistine Chapel are possibly man’s greatest achievement in the history of painting.

Despite his distaste for painting (he was a sculptor and considered painting to be less serious), he reluctantly accepted the commission of this arduous project from Pope Julius II in 1508. Painted between 1508 and 1512, the Sistine Chapel ceiling features 343 figures within more than 5000 square feet of painted ceiling.

Contrary to popular belief, Michelangelo did not paint the ceiling while laying on his back. Holes were drilled into the walls above the windows in the room from which brackets were placed to support a large flat scaffold on which he stood to paint. Even so, the work was physically demanding and Michelangelo wrote this amusing sonnet describing the results.
I’ve grown a goitre by dwelling in this den–
As cats from stagnant streams in Lombardy,
Or in what other land they hap to be–
Which drives the belly close beneath the chin:

My beard turns up to heaven; my nape falls in,
Fixed on my spine: my breast-bone visibly
Grows like a harp: a rich embroidery
Bedews my face from brush-drops thick and thin.

My loins into my paunch like levers grind:
My buttock like a crupper bears my weight;
My feet unguided wander to and fro;
In front my skin grows loose and long; behind,

By bending it becomes more taut and strait;
Crosswise I strain me like a Syrian bow:
Whence false and quaint, I know,
Must be the fruit of squinting brain and eye;

For ill can aim the gun that bends awry.
Come then, Giovanni, try
To succour my dead pictures and my fame;
Since foul I fare and painting is my shame.

This six-tile mural from the first half of the 20th century, depicts
Michelangelo’s magnificent Libyan Sibyl, Phemonoe, the daughter of Zeus and Poseidon’s daughter, Lamia. Phemonoe foretold the “coming of the day when that which is hidden shall be revealed”.

Each of the 6 tiles are 12″ x 12″, with the full image 36″ x 24″.  1st half, 20th century

I have also added a link to view the full ceiling.
https://upload.wikimedia.org/…/07/CAPPELLA_SISTINA_Ceiling.…

36 x 24 inches

91.44 x 60.96 cm

$3500




More items related to: , , ,

6-Tile Mural, Libyan Sibyl from Sistine Chapel

Michelangelo di Lodovico Buonarroti Simoni (1475-1564), universally known simply as Michelangelo, was arguably the greatest artist of all time. His sculpture of David is probably the most famous sculpture in the world and his frescoes on the ceiling of the Sistine Chapel are possibly man’s greatest achievement in the history of painting.

Despite his distaste for painting (he was a sculptor and considered painting to be less serious), he reluctantly accepted the commission of this arduous project from Pope Julius II in 1508. Painted between 1508 and 1512, the Sistine Chapel ceiling features 343 figures within more than 5000 square feet of painted ceiling.

Contrary to popular belief, Michelangelo did not paint the ceiling while laying on his back. Holes were drilled into the walls above the windows in the room from which brackets were placed to support a large flat scaffold on which he stood to paint. Even so, the work was physically demanding and Michelangelo wrote this amusing sonnet describing the results.
I’ve grown a goitre by dwelling in this den–
As cats from stagnant streams in Lombardy,
Or in what other land they hap to be–
Which drives the belly close beneath the chin:

My beard turns up to heaven; my nape falls in,
Fixed on my spine: my breast-bone visibly
Grows like a harp: a rich embroidery
Bedews my face from brush-drops thick and thin.

My loins into my paunch like levers grind:
My buttock like a crupper bears my weight;
My feet unguided wander to and fro;
In front my skin grows loose and long; behind,

By bending it becomes more taut and strait;
Crosswise I strain me like a Syrian bow:
Whence false and quaint, I know,
Must be the fruit of squinting brain and eye;

For ill can aim the gun that bends awry.
Come then, Giovanni, try
To succour my dead pictures and my fame;
Since foul I fare and painting is my shame.

This six-tile mural from the first half of the 20th century, depicts
Michelangelo’s magnificent Libyan Sibyl, Phemonoe, the daughter of Zeus and Poseidon’s daughter, Lamia. Phemonoe foretold the “coming of the day when that which is hidden shall be revealed”.

Each of the 6 tiles are 12″ x 12″, with the full image 36″ x 24″.  1st half, 20th century

I have also added a link to view the full ceiling.
https://upload.wikimedia.org/…/07/CAPPELLA_SISTINA_Ceiling.…

36 x 24 inches

91.44 x 60.96 cm

$3500




More items related to: , , ,

6-Tile Mural, Libyan Sibyl from Sistine Chapel

Michelangelo di Lodovico Buonarroti Simoni (1475-1564), universally known simply as Michelangelo, was arguably the greatest artist of all time. His sculpture of David is probably the most famous sculpture in the world and his frescoes on the ceiling of the Sistine Chapel are possibly man’s greatest achievement in the history of painting.

Despite his distaste for painting (he was a sculptor and considered painting to be less serious), he reluctantly accepted the commission of this arduous project from Pope Julius II in 1508. Painted between 1508 and 1512, the Sistine Chapel ceiling features 343 figures within more than 5000 square feet of painted ceiling.

Contrary to popular belief, Michelangelo did not paint the ceiling while laying on his back. Holes were drilled into the walls above the windows in the room from which brackets were placed to support a large flat scaffold on which he stood to paint. Even so, the work was physically demanding and Michelangelo wrote this amusing sonnet describing the results.
I’ve grown a goitre by dwelling in this den–
As cats from stagnant streams in Lombardy,
Or in what other land they hap to be–
Which drives the belly close beneath the chin:

My beard turns up to heaven; my nape falls in,
Fixed on my spine: my breast-bone visibly
Grows like a harp: a rich embroidery
Bedews my face from brush-drops thick and thin.

My loins into my paunch like levers grind:
My buttock like a crupper bears my weight;
My feet unguided wander to and fro;
In front my skin grows loose and long; behind,

By bending it becomes more taut and strait;
Crosswise I strain me like a Syrian bow:
Whence false and quaint, I know,
Must be the fruit of squinting brain and eye;

For ill can aim the gun that bends awry.
Come then, Giovanni, try
To succour my dead pictures and my fame;
Since foul I fare and painting is my shame.

This six-tile mural from the first half of the 20th century, depicts
Michelangelo’s magnificent Libyan Sibyl, Phemonoe, the daughter of Zeus and Poseidon’s daughter, Lamia. Phemonoe foretold the “coming of the day when that which is hidden shall be revealed”.

Each of the 6 tiles are 12″ x 12″, with the full image 36″ x 24″.  1st half, 20th century

I have also added a link to view the full ceiling.
https://upload.wikimedia.org/…/07/CAPPELLA_SISTINA_Ceiling.…

36 x 24 inches

91.44 x 60.96 cm

$3500




More items related to: , , ,

6-Tile Mural, Libyan Sibyl from Sistine Chapel

Michelangelo di Lodovico Buonarroti Simoni (1475-1564), universally known simply as Michelangelo, was arguably the greatest artist of all time. His sculpture of David is probably the most famous sculpture in the world and his frescoes on the ceiling of the Sistine Chapel are possibly man’s greatest achievement in the history of painting.

Despite his distaste for painting (he was a sculptor and considered painting to be less serious), he reluctantly accepted the commission of this arduous project from Pope Julius II in 1508. Painted between 1508 and 1512, the Sistine Chapel ceiling features 343 figures within more than 5000 square feet of painted ceiling.

Contrary to popular belief, Michelangelo did not paint the ceiling while laying on his back. Holes were drilled into the walls above the windows in the room from which brackets were placed to support a large flat scaffold on which he stood to paint. Even so, the work was physically demanding and Michelangelo wrote this amusing sonnet describing the results.
I’ve grown a goitre by dwelling in this den–
As cats from stagnant streams in Lombardy,
Or in what other land they hap to be–
Which drives the belly close beneath the chin:

My beard turns up to heaven; my nape falls in,
Fixed on my spine: my breast-bone visibly
Grows like a harp: a rich embroidery
Bedews my face from brush-drops thick and thin.

My loins into my paunch like levers grind:
My buttock like a crupper bears my weight;
My feet unguided wander to and fro;
In front my skin grows loose and long; behind,

By bending it becomes more taut and strait;
Crosswise I strain me like a Syrian bow:
Whence false and quaint, I know,
Must be the fruit of squinting brain and eye;

For ill can aim the gun that bends awry.
Come then, Giovanni, try
To succour my dead pictures and my fame;
Since foul I fare and painting is my shame.

This six-tile mural from the first half of the 20th century, depicts
Michelangelo’s magnificent Libyan Sibyl, Phemonoe, the daughter of Zeus and Poseidon’s daughter, Lamia. Phemonoe foretold the “coming of the day when that which is hidden shall be revealed”.

Each of the 6 tiles are 12″ x 12″, with the full image 36″ x 24″.  1st half, 20th century

I have also added a link to view the full ceiling.
https://upload.wikimedia.org/…/07/CAPPELLA_SISTINA_Ceiling.…

36 x 24 inches

91.44 x 60.96 cm

$3500




More items related to: , , ,

6-Tile Mural, Libyan Sibyl from Sistine Chapel

Michelangelo di Lodovico Buonarroti Simoni (1475-1564), universally known simply as Michelangelo, was arguably the greatest artist of all time. His sculpture of David is probably the most famous sculpture in the world and his frescoes on the ceiling of the Sistine Chapel are possibly man’s greatest achievement in the history of painting.

Despite his distaste for painting (he was a sculptor and considered painting to be less serious), he reluctantly accepted the commission of this arduous project from Pope Julius II in 1508. Painted between 1508 and 1512, the Sistine Chapel ceiling features 343 figures within more than 5000 square feet of painted ceiling.

Contrary to popular belief, Michelangelo did not paint the ceiling while laying on his back. Holes were drilled into the walls above the windows in the room from which brackets were placed to support a large flat scaffold on which he stood to paint. Even so, the work was physically demanding and Michelangelo wrote this amusing sonnet describing the results.
I’ve grown a goitre by dwelling in this den–
As cats from stagnant streams in Lombardy,
Or in what other land they hap to be–
Which drives the belly close beneath the chin:

My beard turns up to heaven; my nape falls in,
Fixed on my spine: my breast-bone visibly
Grows like a harp: a rich embroidery
Bedews my face from brush-drops thick and thin.

My loins into my paunch like levers grind:
My buttock like a crupper bears my weight;
My feet unguided wander to and fro;
In front my skin grows loose and long; behind,

By bending it becomes more taut and strait;
Crosswise I strain me like a Syrian bow:
Whence false and quaint, I know,
Must be the fruit of squinting brain and eye;

For ill can aim the gun that bends awry.
Come then, Giovanni, try
To succour my dead pictures and my fame;
Since foul I fare and painting is my shame.

This six-tile mural from the first half of the 20th century, depicts
Michelangelo’s magnificent Libyan Sibyl, Phemonoe, the daughter of Zeus and Poseidon’s daughter, Lamia. Phemonoe foretold the “coming of the day when that which is hidden shall be revealed”.

Each of the 6 tiles are 12″ x 12″, with the full image 36″ x 24″.  1st half, 20th century

I have also added a link to view the full ceiling.
https://upload.wikimedia.org/…/07/CAPPELLA_SISTINA_Ceiling.…

36 x 24 inches

91.44 x 60.96 cm

$3500




More items related to: , , ,

6-Tile Mural, Libyan Sibyl from Sistine Chapel

Michelangelo di Lodovico Buonarroti Simoni (1475-1564), universally known simply as Michelangelo, was arguably the greatest artist of all time. His sculpture of David is probably the most famous sculpture in the world and his frescoes on the ceiling of the Sistine Chapel are possibly man’s greatest achievement in the history of painting.

Despite his distaste for painting (he was a sculptor and considered painting to be less serious), he reluctantly accepted the commission of this arduous project from Pope Julius II in 1508. Painted between 1508 and 1512, the Sistine Chapel ceiling features 343 figures within more than 5000 square feet of painted ceiling.

Contrary to popular belief, Michelangelo did not paint the ceiling while laying on his back. Holes were drilled into the walls above the windows in the room from which brackets were placed to support a large flat scaffold on which he stood to paint. Even so, the work was physically demanding and Michelangelo wrote this amusing sonnet describing the results.
I’ve grown a goitre by dwelling in this den–
As cats from stagnant streams in Lombardy,
Or in what other land they hap to be–
Which drives the belly close beneath the chin:

My beard turns up to heaven; my nape falls in,
Fixed on my spine: my breast-bone visibly
Grows like a harp: a rich embroidery
Bedews my face from brush-drops thick and thin.

My loins into my paunch like levers grind:
My buttock like a crupper bears my weight;
My feet unguided wander to and fro;
In front my skin grows loose and long; behind,

By bending it becomes more taut and strait;
Crosswise I strain me like a Syrian bow:
Whence false and quaint, I know,
Must be the fruit of squinting brain and eye;

For ill can aim the gun that bends awry.
Come then, Giovanni, try
To succour my dead pictures and my fame;
Since foul I fare and painting is my shame.

This six-tile mural from the first half of the 20th century, depicts
Michelangelo’s magnificent Libyan Sibyl, Phemonoe, the daughter of Zeus and Poseidon’s daughter, Lamia. Phemonoe foretold the “coming of the day when that which is hidden shall be revealed”.

Each of the 6 tiles are 12″ x 12″, with the full image 36″ x 24″.  1st half, 20th century

I have also added a link to view the full ceiling.
https://upload.wikimedia.org/…/07/CAPPELLA_SISTINA_Ceiling.…

36 x 24 inches

91.44 x 60.96 cm

$3500




More items related to: , , ,

6-Tile Mural, Libyan Sibyl from Sistine Chapel

Michelangelo di Lodovico Buonarroti Simoni (1475-1564), universally known simply as Michelangelo, was arguably the greatest artist of all time. His sculpture of David is probably the most famous sculpture in the world and his frescoes on the ceiling of the Sistine Chapel are possibly man’s greatest achievement in the history of painting.

Despite his distaste for painting (he was a sculptor and considered painting to be less serious), he reluctantly accepted the commission of this arduous project from Pope Julius II in 1508. Painted between 1508 and 1512, the Sistine Chapel ceiling features 343 figures within more than 5000 square feet of painted ceiling.

Contrary to popular belief, Michelangelo did not paint the ceiling while laying on his back. Holes were drilled into the walls above the windows in the room from which brackets were placed to support a large flat scaffold on which he stood to paint. Even so, the work was physically demanding and Michelangelo wrote this amusing sonnet describing the results.
I’ve grown a goitre by dwelling in this den–
As cats from stagnant streams in Lombardy,
Or in what other land they hap to be–
Which drives the belly close beneath the chin:

My beard turns up to heaven; my nape falls in,
Fixed on my spine: my breast-bone visibly
Grows like a harp: a rich embroidery
Bedews my face from brush-drops thick and thin.

My loins into my paunch like levers grind:
My buttock like a crupper bears my weight;
My feet unguided wander to and fro;
In front my skin grows loose and long; behind,

By bending it becomes more taut and strait;
Crosswise I strain me like a Syrian bow:
Whence false and quaint, I know,
Must be the fruit of squinting brain and eye;

For ill can aim the gun that bends awry.
Come then, Giovanni, try
To succour my dead pictures and my fame;
Since foul I fare and painting is my shame.

This six-tile mural from the first half of the 20th century, depicts
Michelangelo’s magnificent Libyan Sibyl, Phemonoe, the daughter of Zeus and Poseidon’s daughter, Lamia. Phemonoe foretold the “coming of the day when that which is hidden shall be revealed”.

Each of the 6 tiles are 12″ x 12″, with the full image 36″ x 24″.  1st half, 20th century

I have also added a link to view the full ceiling.
https://upload.wikimedia.org/…/07/CAPPELLA_SISTINA_Ceiling.…

36 x 24 inches

91.44 x 60.96 cm

$3500




More items related to: , , ,

6-Tile Mural, Libyan Sibyl from Sistine Chapel

Michelangelo di Lodovico Buonarroti Simoni (1475-1564), universally known simply as Michelangelo, was arguably the greatest artist of all time. His sculpture of David is probably the most famous sculpture in the world and his frescoes on the ceiling of the Sistine Chapel are possibly man’s greatest achievement in the history of painting.

Despite his distaste for painting (he was a sculptor and considered painting to be less serious), he reluctantly accepted the commission of this arduous project from Pope Julius II in 1508. Painted between 1508 and 1512, the Sistine Chapel ceiling features 343 figures within more than 5000 square feet of painted ceiling.

Contrary to popular belief, Michelangelo did not paint the ceiling while laying on his back. Holes were drilled into the walls above the windows in the room from which brackets were placed to support a large flat scaffold on which he stood to paint. Even so, the work was physically demanding and Michelangelo wrote this amusing sonnet describing the results.
I’ve grown a goitre by dwelling in this den–
As cats from stagnant streams in Lombardy,
Or in what other land they hap to be–
Which drives the belly close beneath the chin:

My beard turns up to heaven; my nape falls in,
Fixed on my spine: my breast-bone visibly
Grows like a harp: a rich embroidery
Bedews my face from brush-drops thick and thin.

My loins into my paunch like levers grind:
My buttock like a crupper bears my weight;
My feet unguided wander to and fro;
In front my skin grows loose and long; behind,

By bending it becomes more taut and strait;
Crosswise I strain me like a Syrian bow:
Whence false and quaint, I know,
Must be the fruit of squinting brain and eye;

For ill can aim the gun that bends awry.
Come then, Giovanni, try
To succour my dead pictures and my fame;
Since foul I fare and painting is my shame.

This six-tile mural from the first half of the 20th century, depicts
Michelangelo’s magnificent Libyan Sibyl, Phemonoe, the daughter of Zeus and Poseidon’s daughter, Lamia. Phemonoe foretold the “coming of the day when that which is hidden shall be revealed”.

Each of the 6 tiles are 12″ x 12″, with the full image 36″ x 24″.  1st half, 20th century

I have also added a link to view the full ceiling.
https://upload.wikimedia.org/…/07/CAPPELLA_SISTINA_Ceiling.…

36 x 24 inches

91.44 x 60.96 cm

$3500




More items related to: , , ,

6-Tile Mural, Libyan Sibyl from Sistine Chapel

Michelangelo di Lodovico Buonarroti Simoni (1475-1564), universally known simply as Michelangelo, was arguably the greatest artist of all time. His sculpture of David is probably the most famous sculpture in the world and his frescoes on the ceiling of the Sistine Chapel are possibly man’s greatest achievement in the history of painting.

Despite his distaste for painting (he was a sculptor and considered painting to be less serious), he reluctantly accepted the commission of this arduous project from Pope Julius II in 1508. Painted between 1508 and 1512, the Sistine Chapel ceiling features 343 figures within more than 5000 square feet of painted ceiling.

Contrary to popular belief, Michelangelo did not paint the ceiling while laying on his back. Holes were drilled into the walls above the windows in the room from which brackets were placed to support a large flat scaffold on which he stood to paint. Even so, the work was physically demanding and Michelangelo wrote this amusing sonnet describing the results.
I’ve grown a goitre by dwelling in this den–
As cats from stagnant streams in Lombardy,
Or in what other land they hap to be–
Which drives the belly close beneath the chin:

My beard turns up to heaven; my nape falls in,
Fixed on my spine: my breast-bone visibly
Grows like a harp: a rich embroidery
Bedews my face from brush-drops thick and thin.

My loins into my paunch like levers grind:
My buttock like a crupper bears my weight;
My feet unguided wander to and fro;
In front my skin grows loose and long; behind,

By bending it becomes more taut and strait;
Crosswise I strain me like a Syrian bow:
Whence false and quaint, I know,
Must be the fruit of squinting brain and eye;

For ill can aim the gun that bends awry.
Come then, Giovanni, try
To succour my dead pictures and my fame;
Since foul I fare and painting is my shame.

This six-tile mural from the first half of the 20th century, depicts
Michelangelo’s magnificent Libyan Sibyl, Phemonoe, the daughter of Zeus and Poseidon’s daughter, Lamia. Phemonoe foretold the “coming of the day when that which is hidden shall be revealed”.

Each of the 6 tiles are 12″ x 12″, with the full image 36″ x 24″.  1st half, 20th century

I have also added a link to view the full ceiling.
https://upload.wikimedia.org/…/07/CAPPELLA_SISTINA_Ceiling.…

36 x 24 inches

91.44 x 60.96 cm

$3500




More items related to: , , ,

6-Tile Mural, Libyan Sibyl from Sistine Chapel

Michelangelo di Lodovico Buonarroti Simoni (1475-1564), universally known simply as Michelangelo, was arguably the greatest artist of all time. His sculpture of David is probably the most famous sculpture in the world and his frescoes on the ceiling of the Sistine Chapel are possibly man’s greatest achievement in the history of painting.

Despite his distaste for painting (he was a sculptor and considered painting to be less serious), he reluctantly accepted the commission of this arduous project from Pope Julius II in 1508. Painted between 1508 and 1512, the Sistine Chapel ceiling features 343 figures within more than 5000 square feet of painted ceiling.

Contrary to popular belief, Michelangelo did not paint the ceiling while laying on his back. Holes were drilled into the walls above the windows in the room from which brackets were placed to support a large flat scaffold on which he stood to paint. Even so, the work was physically demanding and Michelangelo wrote this amusing sonnet describing the results.
I’ve grown a goitre by dwelling in this den–
As cats from stagnant streams in Lombardy,
Or in what other land they hap to be–
Which drives the belly close beneath the chin:

My beard turns up to heaven; my nape falls in,
Fixed on my spine: my breast-bone visibly
Grows like a harp: a rich embroidery
Bedews my face from brush-drops thick and thin.

My loins into my paunch like levers grind:
My buttock like a crupper bears my weight;
My feet unguided wander to and fro;
In front my skin grows loose and long; behind,

By bending it becomes more taut and strait;
Crosswise I strain me like a Syrian bow:
Whence false and quaint, I know,
Must be the fruit of squinting brain and eye;

For ill can aim the gun that bends awry.
Come then, Giovanni, try
To succour my dead pictures and my fame;
Since foul I fare and painting is my shame.

This six-tile mural from the first half of the 20th century, depicts
Michelangelo’s magnificent Libyan Sibyl, Phemonoe, the daughter of Zeus and Poseidon’s daughter, Lamia. Phemonoe foretold the “coming of the day when that which is hidden shall be revealed”.

Each of the 6 tiles are 12″ x 12″, with the full image 36″ x 24″.  1st half, 20th century

I have also added a link to view the full ceiling.
https://upload.wikimedia.org/…/07/CAPPELLA_SISTINA_Ceiling.…

36 x 24 inches

91.44 x 60.96 cm

$3500




More items related to: , , ,

6-Tile Mural, Libyan Sibyl from Sistine Chapel

Michelangelo di Lodovico Buonarroti Simoni (1475-1564), universally known simply as Michelangelo, was arguably the greatest artist of all time. His sculpture of David is probably the most famous sculpture in the world and his frescoes on the ceiling of the Sistine Chapel are possibly man’s greatest achievement in the history of painting.

Despite his distaste for painting (he was a sculptor and considered painting to be less serious), he reluctantly accepted the commission of this arduous project from Pope Julius II in 1508. Painted between 1508 and 1512, the Sistine Chapel ceiling features 343 figures within more than 5000 square feet of painted ceiling.

Contrary to popular belief, Michelangelo did not paint the ceiling while laying on his back. Holes were drilled into the walls above the windows in the room from which brackets were placed to support a large flat scaffold on which he stood to paint. Even so, the work was physically demanding and Michelangelo wrote this amusing sonnet describing the results.
I’ve grown a goitre by dwelling in this den–
As cats from stagnant streams in Lombardy,
Or in what other land they hap to be–
Which drives the belly close beneath the chin:

My beard turns up to heaven; my nape falls in,
Fixed on my spine: my breast-bone visibly
Grows like a harp: a rich embroidery
Bedews my face from brush-drops thick and thin.

My loins into my paunch like levers grind:
My buttock like a crupper bears my weight;
My feet unguided wander to and fro;
In front my skin grows loose and long; behind,

By bending it becomes more taut and strait;
Crosswise I strain me like a Syrian bow:
Whence false and quaint, I know,
Must be the fruit of squinting brain and eye;

For ill can aim the gun that bends awry.
Come then, Giovanni, try
To succour my dead pictures and my fame;
Since foul I fare and painting is my shame.

This six-tile mural from the first half of the 20th century, depicts
Michelangelo’s magnificent Libyan Sibyl, Phemonoe, the daughter of Zeus and Poseidon’s daughter, Lamia. Phemonoe foretold the “coming of the day when that which is hidden shall be revealed”.

Each of the 6 tiles are 12″ x 12″, with the full image 36″ x 24″.  1st half, 20th century

I have also added a link to view the full ceiling.
https://upload.wikimedia.org/…/07/CAPPELLA_SISTINA_Ceiling.…

36 x 24 inches

91.44 x 60.96 cm

$3500




More items related to: , , ,

6-Tile Mural, Libyan Sibyl from Sistine Chapel

Michelangelo di Lodovico Buonarroti Simoni (1475-1564), universally known simply as Michelangelo, was arguably the greatest artist of all time. His sculpture of David is probably the most famous sculpture in the world and his frescoes on the ceiling of the Sistine Chapel are possibly man’s greatest achievement in the history of painting.

Despite his distaste for painting (he was a sculptor and considered painting to be less serious), he reluctantly accepted the commission of this arduous project from Pope Julius II in 1508. Painted between 1508 and 1512, the Sistine Chapel ceiling features 343 figures within more than 5000 square feet of painted ceiling.

Contrary to popular belief, Michelangelo did not paint the ceiling while laying on his back. Holes were drilled into the walls above the windows in the room from which brackets were placed to support a large flat scaffold on which he stood to paint. Even so, the work was physically demanding and Michelangelo wrote this amusing sonnet describing the results.
I’ve grown a goitre by dwelling in this den–
As cats from stagnant streams in Lombardy,
Or in what other land they hap to be–
Which drives the belly close beneath the chin:

My beard turns up to heaven; my nape falls in,
Fixed on my spine: my breast-bone visibly
Grows like a harp: a rich embroidery
Bedews my face from brush-drops thick and thin.

My loins into my paunch like levers grind:
My buttock like a crupper bears my weight;
My feet unguided wander to and fro;
In front my skin grows loose and long; behind,

By bending it becomes more taut and strait;
Crosswise I strain me like a Syrian bow:
Whence false and quaint, I know,
Must be the fruit of squinting brain and eye;

For ill can aim the gun that bends awry.
Come then, Giovanni, try
To succour my dead pictures and my fame;
Since foul I fare and painting is my shame.

This six-tile mural from the first half of the 20th century, depicts
Michelangelo’s magnificent Libyan Sibyl, Phemonoe, the daughter of Zeus and Poseidon’s daughter, Lamia. Phemonoe foretold the “coming of the day when that which is hidden shall be revealed”.

Each of the 6 tiles are 12″ x 12″, with the full image 36″ x 24″.  1st half, 20th century

I have also added a link to view the full ceiling.
https://upload.wikimedia.org/…/07/CAPPELLA_SISTINA_Ceiling.…

36 x 24 inches

91.44 x 60.96 cm

$3500




More items related to: , , ,

6-Tile Mural, Libyan Sibyl from Sistine Chapel

Michelangelo di Lodovico Buonarroti Simoni (1475-1564), universally known simply as Michelangelo, was arguably the greatest artist of all time. His sculpture of David is probably the most famous sculpture in the world and his frescoes on the ceiling of the Sistine Chapel are possibly man’s greatest achievement in the history of painting.

Despite his distaste for painting (he was a sculptor and considered painting to be less serious), he reluctantly accepted the commission of this arduous project from Pope Julius II in 1508. Painted between 1508 and 1512, the Sistine Chapel ceiling features 343 figures within more than 5000 square feet of painted ceiling.

Contrary to popular belief, Michelangelo did not paint the ceiling while laying on his back. Holes were drilled into the walls above the windows in the room from which brackets were placed to support a large flat scaffold on which he stood to paint. Even so, the work was physically demanding and Michelangelo wrote this amusing sonnet describing the results.
I’ve grown a goitre by dwelling in this den–
As cats from stagnant streams in Lombardy,
Or in what other land they hap to be–
Which drives the belly close beneath the chin:

My beard turns up to heaven; my nape falls in,
Fixed on my spine: my breast-bone visibly
Grows like a harp: a rich embroidery
Bedews my face from brush-drops thick and thin.

My loins into my paunch like levers grind:
My buttock like a crupper bears my weight;
My feet unguided wander to and fro;
In front my skin grows loose and long; behind,

By bending it becomes more taut and strait;
Crosswise I strain me like a Syrian bow:
Whence false and quaint, I know,
Must be the fruit of squinting brain and eye;

For ill can aim the gun that bends awry.
Come then, Giovanni, try
To succour my dead pictures and my fame;
Since foul I fare and painting is my shame.

This six-tile mural from the first half of the 20th century, depicts
Michelangelo’s magnificent Libyan Sibyl, Phemonoe, the daughter of Zeus and Poseidon’s daughter, Lamia. Phemonoe foretold the “coming of the day when that which is hidden shall be revealed”.

Each of the 6 tiles are 12″ x 12″, with the full image 36″ x 24″.  1st half, 20th century

I have also added a link to view the full ceiling.
https://upload.wikimedia.org/…/07/CAPPELLA_SISTINA_Ceiling.…

36 x 24 inches

91.44 x 60.96 cm

$3500




More items related to: , , ,

6-Tile Mural, Libyan Sibyl from Sistine Chapel

Michelangelo di Lodovico Buonarroti Simoni (1475-1564), universally known simply as Michelangelo, was arguably the greatest artist of all time. His sculpture of David is probably the most famous sculpture in the world and his frescoes on the ceiling of the Sistine Chapel are possibly man’s greatest achievement in the history of painting.

Despite his distaste for painting (he was a sculptor and considered painting to be less serious), he reluctantly accepted the commission of this arduous project from Pope Julius II in 1508. Painted between 1508 and 1512, the Sistine Chapel ceiling features 343 figures within more than 5000 square feet of painted ceiling.

Contrary to popular belief, Michelangelo did not paint the ceiling while laying on his back. Holes were drilled into the walls above the windows in the room from which brackets were placed to support a large flat scaffold on which he stood to paint. Even so, the work was physically demanding and Michelangelo wrote this amusing sonnet describing the results.
I’ve grown a goitre by dwelling in this den–
As cats from stagnant streams in Lombardy,
Or in what other land they hap to be–
Which drives the belly close beneath the chin:

My beard turns up to heaven; my nape falls in,
Fixed on my spine: my breast-bone visibly
Grows like a harp: a rich embroidery
Bedews my face from brush-drops thick and thin.

My loins into my paunch like levers grind:
My buttock like a crupper bears my weight;
My feet unguided wander to and fro;
In front my skin grows loose and long; behind,

By bending it becomes more taut and strait;
Crosswise I strain me like a Syrian bow:
Whence false and quaint, I know,
Must be the fruit of squinting brain and eye;

For ill can aim the gun that bends awry.
Come then, Giovanni, try
To succour my dead pictures and my fame;
Since foul I fare and painting is my shame.

This six-tile mural from the first half of the 20th century, depicts
Michelangelo’s magnificent Libyan Sibyl, Phemonoe, the daughter of Zeus and Poseidon’s daughter, Lamia. Phemonoe foretold the “coming of the day when that which is hidden shall be revealed”.

Each of the 6 tiles are 12″ x 12″, with the full image 36″ x 24″.  1st half, 20th century

I have also added a link to view the full ceiling.
https://upload.wikimedia.org/…/07/CAPPELLA_SISTINA_Ceiling.…

36 x 24 inches

91.44 x 60.96 cm

$3500




More items related to: , , ,

6-Tile Mural, Libyan Sibyl from Sistine Chapel

Michelangelo di Lodovico Buonarroti Simoni (1475-1564), universally known simply as Michelangelo, was arguably the greatest artist of all time. His sculpture of David is probably the most famous sculpture in the world and his frescoes on the ceiling of the Sistine Chapel are possibly man’s greatest achievement in the history of painting.

Despite his distaste for painting (he was a sculptor and considered painting to be less serious), he reluctantly accepted the commission of this arduous project from Pope Julius II in 1508. Painted between 1508 and 1512, the Sistine Chapel ceiling features 343 figures within more than 5000 square feet of painted ceiling.

Contrary to popular belief, Michelangelo did not paint the ceiling while laying on his back. Holes were drilled into the walls above the windows in the room from which brackets were placed to support a large flat scaffold on which he stood to paint. Even so, the work was physically demanding and Michelangelo wrote this amusing sonnet describing the results.
I’ve grown a goitre by dwelling in this den–
As cats from stagnant streams in Lombardy,
Or in what other land they hap to be–
Which drives the belly close beneath the chin:

My beard turns up to heaven; my nape falls in,
Fixed on my spine: my breast-bone visibly
Grows like a harp: a rich embroidery
Bedews my face from brush-drops thick and thin.

My loins into my paunch like levers grind:
My buttock like a crupper bears my weight;
My feet unguided wander to and fro;
In front my skin grows loose and long; behind,

By bending it becomes more taut and strait;
Crosswise I strain me like a Syrian bow:
Whence false and quaint, I know,
Must be the fruit of squinting brain and eye;

For ill can aim the gun that bends awry.
Come then, Giovanni, try
To succour my dead pictures and my fame;
Since foul I fare and painting is my shame.

This six-tile mural from the first half of the 20th century, depicts
Michelangelo’s magnificent Libyan Sibyl, Phemonoe, the daughter of Zeus and Poseidon’s daughter, Lamia. Phemonoe foretold the “coming of the day when that which is hidden shall be revealed”.

Each of the 6 tiles are 12″ x 12″, with the full image 36″ x 24″.  1st half, 20th century

I have also added a link to view the full ceiling.
https://upload.wikimedia.org/…/07/CAPPELLA_SISTINA_Ceiling.…

36 x 24 inches

91.44 x 60.96 cm

$3500




More items related to: , , ,

6-Tile Mural, Libyan Sibyl from Sistine Chapel

Michelangelo di Lodovico Buonarroti Simoni (1475-1564), universally known simply as Michelangelo, was arguably the greatest artist of all time. His sculpture of David is probably the most famous sculpture in the world and his frescoes on the ceiling of the Sistine Chapel are possibly man’s greatest achievement in the history of painting.

Despite his distaste for painting (he was a sculptor and considered painting to be less serious), he reluctantly accepted the commission of this arduous project from Pope Julius II in 1508. Painted between 1508 and 1512, the Sistine Chapel ceiling features 343 figures within more than 5000 square feet of painted ceiling.

Contrary to popular belief, Michelangelo did not paint the ceiling while laying on his back. Holes were drilled into the walls above the windows in the room from which brackets were placed to support a large flat scaffold on which he stood to paint. Even so, the work was physically demanding and Michelangelo wrote this amusing sonnet describing the results.
I’ve grown a goitre by dwelling in this den–
As cats from stagnant streams in Lombardy,
Or in what other land they hap to be–
Which drives the belly close beneath the chin:

My beard turns up to heaven; my nape falls in,
Fixed on my spine: my breast-bone visibly
Grows like a harp: a rich embroidery
Bedews my face from brush-drops thick and thin.

My loins into my paunch like levers grind:
My buttock like a crupper bears my weight;
My feet unguided wander to and fro;
In front my skin grows loose and long; behind,

By bending it becomes more taut and strait;
Crosswise I strain me like a Syrian bow:
Whence false and quaint, I know,
Must be the fruit of squinting brain and eye;

For ill can aim the gun that bends awry.
Come then, Giovanni, try
To succour my dead pictures and my fame;
Since foul I fare and painting is my shame.

This six-tile mural from the first half of the 20th century, depicts
Michelangelo’s magnificent Libyan Sibyl, Phemonoe, the daughter of Zeus and Poseidon’s daughter, Lamia. Phemonoe foretold the “coming of the day when that which is hidden shall be revealed”.

Each of the 6 tiles are 12″ x 12″, with the full image 36″ x 24″.  1st half, 20th century

I have also added a link to view the full ceiling.
https://upload.wikimedia.org/…/07/CAPPELLA_SISTINA_Ceiling.…

36 x 24 inches

91.44 x 60.96 cm

$3500




More items related to: , , ,

6-Tile Mural, Libyan Sibyl from Sistine Chapel

Michelangelo di Lodovico Buonarroti Simoni (1475-1564), universally known simply as Michelangelo, was arguably the greatest artist of all time. His sculpture of David is probably the most famous sculpture in the world and his frescoes on the ceiling of the Sistine Chapel are possibly man’s greatest achievement in the history of painting.

Despite his distaste for painting (he was a sculptor and considered painting to be less serious), he reluctantly accepted the commission of this arduous project from Pope Julius II in 1508. Painted between 1508 and 1512, the Sistine Chapel ceiling features 343 figures within more than 5000 square feet of painted ceiling.

Contrary to popular belief, Michelangelo did not paint the ceiling while laying on his back. Holes were drilled into the walls above the windows in the room from which brackets were placed to support a large flat scaffold on which he stood to paint. Even so, the work was physically demanding and Michelangelo wrote this amusing sonnet describing the results.
I’ve grown a goitre by dwelling in this den–
As cats from stagnant streams in Lombardy,
Or in what other land they hap to be–
Which drives the belly close beneath the chin:

My beard turns up to heaven; my nape falls in,
Fixed on my spine: my breast-bone visibly
Grows like a harp: a rich embroidery
Bedews my face from brush-drops thick and thin.

My loins into my paunch like levers grind:
My buttock like a crupper bears my weight;
My feet unguided wander to and fro;
In front my skin grows loose and long; behind,

By bending it becomes more taut and strait;
Crosswise I strain me like a Syrian bow:
Whence false and quaint, I know,
Must be the fruit of squinting brain and eye;

For ill can aim the gun that bends awry.
Come then, Giovanni, try
To succour my dead pictures and my fame;
Since foul I fare and painting is my shame.

This six-tile mural from the first half of the 20th century, depicts
Michelangelo’s magnificent Libyan Sibyl, Phemonoe, the daughter of Zeus and Poseidon’s daughter, Lamia. Phemonoe foretold the “coming of the day when that which is hidden shall be revealed”.

Each of the 6 tiles are 12″ x 12″, with the full image 36″ x 24″.  1st half, 20th century

I have also added a link to view the full ceiling.
https://upload.wikimedia.org/…/07/CAPPELLA_SISTINA_Ceiling.…

36 x 24 inches

91.44 x 60.96 cm

$3500




More items related to: , , ,

6-Tile Mural, Libyan Sibyl from Sistine Chapel

Michelangelo di Lodovico Buonarroti Simoni (1475-1564), universally known simply as Michelangelo, was arguably the greatest artist of all time. His sculpture of David is probably the most famous sculpture in the world and his frescoes on the ceiling of the Sistine Chapel are possibly man’s greatest achievement in the history of painting.

Despite his distaste for painting (he was a sculptor and considered painting to be less serious), he reluctantly accepted the commission of this arduous project from Pope Julius II in 1508. Painted between 1508 and 1512, the Sistine Chapel ceiling features 343 figures within more than 5000 square feet of painted ceiling.

Contrary to popular belief, Michelangelo did not paint the ceiling while laying on his back. Holes were drilled into the walls above the windows in the room from which brackets were placed to support a large flat scaffold on which he stood to paint. Even so, the work was physically demanding and Michelangelo wrote this amusing sonnet describing the results.
I’ve grown a goitre by dwelling in this den–
As cats from stagnant streams in Lombardy,
Or in what other land they hap to be–
Which drives the belly close beneath the chin:

My beard turns up to heaven; my nape falls in,
Fixed on my spine: my breast-bone visibly
Grows like a harp: a rich embroidery
Bedews my face from brush-drops thick and thin.

My loins into my paunch like levers grind:
My buttock like a crupper bears my weight;
My feet unguided wander to and fro;
In front my skin grows loose and long; behind,

By bending it becomes more taut and strait;
Crosswise I strain me like a Syrian bow:
Whence false and quaint, I know,
Must be the fruit of squinting brain and eye;

For ill can aim the gun that bends awry.
Come then, Giovanni, try
To succour my dead pictures and my fame;
Since foul I fare and painting is my shame.

This six-tile mural from the first half of the 20th century, depicts
Michelangelo’s magnificent Libyan Sibyl, Phemonoe, the daughter of Zeus and Poseidon’s daughter, Lamia. Phemonoe foretold the “coming of the day when that which is hidden shall be revealed”.

Each of the 6 tiles are 12″ x 12″, with the full image 36″ x 24″.  1st half, 20th century

I have also added a link to view the full ceiling.
https://upload.wikimedia.org/…/07/CAPPELLA_SISTINA_Ceiling.…

36 x 24 inches

91.44 x 60.96 cm

$3500




More items related to: , , ,

6-Tile Mural, Libyan Sibyl from Sistine Chapel

Michelangelo di Lodovico Buonarroti Simoni (1475-1564), universally known simply as Michelangelo, was arguably the greatest artist of all time. His sculpture of David is probably the most famous sculpture in the world and his frescoes on the ceiling of the Sistine Chapel are possibly man’s greatest achievement in the history of painting.

Despite his distaste for painting (he was a sculptor and considered painting to be less serious), he reluctantly accepted the commission of this arduous project from Pope Julius II in 1508. Painted between 1508 and 1512, the Sistine Chapel ceiling features 343 figures within more than 5000 square feet of painted ceiling.

Contrary to popular belief, Michelangelo did not paint the ceiling while laying on his back. Holes were drilled into the walls above the windows in the room from which brackets were placed to support a large flat scaffold on which he stood to paint. Even so, the work was physically demanding and Michelangelo wrote this amusing sonnet describing the results.
I’ve grown a goitre by dwelling in this den–
As cats from stagnant streams in Lombardy,
Or in what other land they hap to be–
Which drives the belly close beneath the chin:

My beard turns up to heaven; my nape falls in,
Fixed on my spine: my breast-bone visibly
Grows like a harp: a rich embroidery
Bedews my face from brush-drops thick and thin.

My loins into my paunch like levers grind:
My buttock like a crupper bears my weight;
My feet unguided wander to and fro;
In front my skin grows loose and long; behind,

By bending it becomes more taut and strait;
Crosswise I strain me like a Syrian bow:
Whence false and quaint, I know,
Must be the fruit of squinting brain and eye;

For ill can aim the gun that bends awry.
Come then, Giovanni, try
To succour my dead pictures and my fame;
Since foul I fare and painting is my shame.

This six-tile mural from the first half of the 20th century, depicts
Michelangelo’s magnificent Libyan Sibyl, Phemonoe, the daughter of Zeus and Poseidon’s daughter, Lamia. Phemonoe foretold the “coming of the day when that which is hidden shall be revealed”.

Each of the 6 tiles are 12″ x 12″, with the full image 36″ x 24″.  1st half, 20th century

I have also added a link to view the full ceiling.
https://upload.wikimedia.org/…/07/CAPPELLA_SISTINA_Ceiling.…

36 x 24 inches

91.44 x 60.96 cm

$3500




More items related to: , , ,

6-Tile Mural, Libyan Sibyl from Sistine Chapel

Michelangelo di Lodovico Buonarroti Simoni (1475-1564), universally known simply as Michelangelo, was arguably the greatest artist of all time. His sculpture of David is probably the most famous sculpture in the world and his frescoes on the ceiling of the Sistine Chapel are possibly man’s greatest achievement in the history of painting.

Despite his distaste for painting (he was a sculptor and considered painting to be less serious), he reluctantly accepted the commission of this arduous project from Pope Julius II in 1508. Painted between 1508 and 1512, the Sistine Chapel ceiling features 343 figures within more than 5000 square feet of painted ceiling.

Contrary to popular belief, Michelangelo did not paint the ceiling while laying on his back. Holes were drilled into the walls above the windows in the room from which brackets were placed to support a large flat scaffold on which he stood to paint. Even so, the work was physically demanding and Michelangelo wrote this amusing sonnet describing the results.
I’ve grown a goitre by dwelling in this den–
As cats from stagnant streams in Lombardy,
Or in what other land they hap to be–
Which drives the belly close beneath the chin:

My beard turns up to heaven; my nape falls in,
Fixed on my spine: my breast-bone visibly
Grows like a harp: a rich embroidery
Bedews my face from brush-drops thick and thin.

My loins into my paunch like levers grind:
My buttock like a crupper bears my weight;
My feet unguided wander to and fro;
In front my skin grows loose and long; behind,

By bending it becomes more taut and strait;
Crosswise I strain me like a Syrian bow:
Whence false and quaint, I know,
Must be the fruit of squinting brain and eye;

For ill can aim the gun that bends awry.
Come then, Giovanni, try
To succour my dead pictures and my fame;
Since foul I fare and painting is my shame.

This six-tile mural from the first half of the 20th century, depicts
Michelangelo’s magnificent Libyan Sibyl, Phemonoe, the daughter of Zeus and Poseidon’s daughter, Lamia. Phemonoe foretold the “coming of the day when that which is hidden shall be revealed”.

Each of the 6 tiles are 12″ x 12″, with the full image 36″ x 24″.  1st half, 20th century

I have also added a link to view the full ceiling.
https://upload.wikimedia.org/…/07/CAPPELLA_SISTINA_Ceiling.…

36 x 24 inches

91.44 x 60.96 cm

$3500




More items related to: , , ,

6-Tile Mural, Libyan Sibyl from Sistine Chapel

Michelangelo di Lodovico Buonarroti Simoni (1475-1564), universally known simply as Michelangelo, was arguably the greatest artist of all time. His sculpture of David is probably the most famous sculpture in the world and his frescoes on the ceiling of the Sistine Chapel are possibly man’s greatest achievement in the history of painting.

Despite his distaste for painting (he was a sculptor and considered painting to be less serious), he reluctantly accepted the commission of this arduous project from Pope Julius II in 1508. Painted between 1508 and 1512, the Sistine Chapel ceiling features 343 figures within more than 5000 square feet of painted ceiling.

Contrary to popular belief, Michelangelo did not paint the ceiling while laying on his back. Holes were drilled into the walls above the windows in the room from which brackets were placed to support a large flat scaffold on which he stood to paint. Even so, the work was physically demanding and Michelangelo wrote this amusing sonnet describing the results.
I’ve grown a goitre by dwelling in this den–
As cats from stagnant streams in Lombardy,
Or in what other land they hap to be–
Which drives the belly close beneath the chin:

My beard turns up to heaven; my nape falls in,
Fixed on my spine: my breast-bone visibly
Grows like a harp: a rich embroidery
Bedews my face from brush-drops thick and thin.

My loins into my paunch like levers grind:
My buttock like a crupper bears my weight;
My feet unguided wander to and fro;
In front my skin grows loose and long; behind,

By bending it becomes more taut and strait;
Crosswise I strain me like a Syrian bow:
Whence false and quaint, I know,
Must be the fruit of squinting brain and eye;

For ill can aim the gun that bends awry.
Come then, Giovanni, try
To succour my dead pictures and my fame;
Since foul I fare and painting is my shame.

This six-tile mural from the first half of the 20th century, depicts
Michelangelo’s magnificent Libyan Sibyl, Phemonoe, the daughter of Zeus and Poseidon’s daughter, Lamia. Phemonoe foretold the “coming of the day when that which is hidden shall be revealed”.

Each of the 6 tiles are 12″ x 12″, with the full image 36″ x 24″.  1st half, 20th century

I have also added a link to view the full ceiling.
https://upload.wikimedia.org/…/07/CAPPELLA_SISTINA_Ceiling.…

36 x 24 inches

91.44 x 60.96 cm

$3500




More items related to: , , ,

6-Tile Mural, Libyan Sibyl from Sistine Chapel

Michelangelo di Lodovico Buonarroti Simoni (1475-1564), universally known simply as Michelangelo, was arguably the greatest artist of all time. His sculpture of David is probably the most famous sculpture in the world and his frescoes on the ceiling of the Sistine Chapel are possibly man’s greatest achievement in the history of painting.

Despite his distaste for painting (he was a sculptor and considered painting to be less serious), he reluctantly accepted the commission of this arduous project from Pope Julius II in 1508. Painted between 1508 and 1512, the Sistine Chapel ceiling features 343 figures within more than 5000 square feet of painted ceiling.

Contrary to popular belief, Michelangelo did not paint the ceiling while laying on his back. Holes were drilled into the walls above the windows in the room from which brackets were placed to support a large flat scaffold on which he stood to paint. Even so, the work was physically demanding and Michelangelo wrote this amusing sonnet describing the results.
I’ve grown a goitre by dwelling in this den–
As cats from stagnant streams in Lombardy,
Or in what other land they hap to be–
Which drives the belly close beneath the chin:

My beard turns up to heaven; my nape falls in,
Fixed on my spine: my breast-bone visibly
Grows like a harp: a rich embroidery
Bedews my face from brush-drops thick and thin.

My loins into my paunch like levers grind:
My buttock like a crupper bears my weight;
My feet unguided wander to and fro;
In front my skin grows loose and long; behind,

By bending it becomes more taut and strait;
Crosswise I strain me like a Syrian bow:
Whence false and quaint, I know,
Must be the fruit of squinting brain and eye;

For ill can aim the gun that bends awry.
Come then, Giovanni, try
To succour my dead pictures and my fame;
Since foul I fare and painting is my shame.

This six-tile mural from the first half of the 20th century, depicts
Michelangelo’s magnificent Libyan Sibyl, Phemonoe, the daughter of Zeus and Poseidon’s daughter, Lamia. Phemonoe foretold the “coming of the day when that which is hidden shall be revealed”.

Each of the 6 tiles are 12″ x 12″, with the full image 36″ x 24″.  1st half, 20th century

I have also added a link to view the full ceiling.
https://upload.wikimedia.org/…/07/CAPPELLA_SISTINA_Ceiling.…

36 x 24 inches

91.44 x 60.96 cm

$3500




More items related to: , , ,

6-Tile Mural, Libyan Sibyl from Sistine Chapel

Michelangelo di Lodovico Buonarroti Simoni (1475-1564), universally known simply as Michelangelo, was arguably the greatest artist of all time. His sculpture of David is probably the most famous sculpture in the world and his frescoes on the ceiling of the Sistine Chapel are possibly man’s greatest achievement in the history of painting.

Despite his distaste for painting (he was a sculptor and considered painting to be less serious), he reluctantly accepted the commission of this arduous project from Pope Julius II in 1508. Painted between 1508 and 1512, the Sistine Chapel ceiling features 343 figures within more than 5000 square feet of painted ceiling.

Contrary to popular belief, Michelangelo did not paint the ceiling while laying on his back. Holes were drilled into the walls above the windows in the room from which brackets were placed to support a large flat scaffold on which he stood to paint. Even so, the work was physically demanding and Michelangelo wrote this amusing sonnet describing the results.
I’ve grown a goitre by dwelling in this den–
As cats from stagnant streams in Lombardy,
Or in what other land they hap to be–
Which drives the belly close beneath the chin:

My beard turns up to heaven; my nape falls in,
Fixed on my spine: my breast-bone visibly
Grows like a harp: a rich embroidery
Bedews my face from brush-drops thick and thin.

My loins into my paunch like levers grind:
My buttock like a crupper bears my weight;
My feet unguided wander to and fro;
In front my skin grows loose and long; behind,

By bending it becomes more taut and strait;
Crosswise I strain me like a Syrian bow:
Whence false and quaint, I know,
Must be the fruit of squinting brain and eye;

For ill can aim the gun that bends awry.
Come then, Giovanni, try
To succour my dead pictures and my fame;
Since foul I fare and painting is my shame.

This six-tile mural from the first half of the 20th century, depicts
Michelangelo’s magnificent Libyan Sibyl, Phemonoe, the daughter of Zeus and Poseidon’s daughter, Lamia. Phemonoe foretold the “coming of the day when that which is hidden shall be revealed”.

Each of the 6 tiles are 12″ x 12″, with the full image 36″ x 24″.  1st half, 20th century

I have also added a link to view the full ceiling.
https://upload.wikimedia.org/…/07/CAPPELLA_SISTINA_Ceiling.…

36 x 24 inches

91.44 x 60.96 cm

$3500




More items related to: , , ,

6-Tile Mural, Libyan Sibyl from Sistine Chapel

Michelangelo di Lodovico Buonarroti Simoni (1475-1564), universally known simply as Michelangelo, was arguably the greatest artist of all time. His sculpture of David is probably the most famous sculpture in the world and his frescoes on the ceiling of the Sistine Chapel are possibly man’s greatest achievement in the history of painting.

Despite his distaste for painting (he was a sculptor and considered painting to be less serious), he reluctantly accepted the commission of this arduous project from Pope Julius II in 1508. Painted between 1508 and 1512, the Sistine Chapel ceiling features 343 figures within more than 5000 square feet of painted ceiling.

Contrary to popular belief, Michelangelo did not paint the ceiling while laying on his back. Holes were drilled into the walls above the windows in the room from which brackets were placed to support a large flat scaffold on which he stood to paint. Even so, the work was physically demanding and Michelangelo wrote this amusing sonnet describing the results.
I’ve grown a goitre by dwelling in this den–
As cats from stagnant streams in Lombardy,
Or in what other land they hap to be–
Which drives the belly close beneath the chin:

My beard turns up to heaven; my nape falls in,
Fixed on my spine: my breast-bone visibly
Grows like a harp: a rich embroidery
Bedews my face from brush-drops thick and thin.

My loins into my paunch like levers grind:
My buttock like a crupper bears my weight;
My feet unguided wander to and fro;
In front my skin grows loose and long; behind,

By bending it becomes more taut and strait;
Crosswise I strain me like a Syrian bow:
Whence false and quaint, I know,
Must be the fruit of squinting brain and eye;

For ill can aim the gun that bends awry.
Come then, Giovanni, try
To succour my dead pictures and my fame;
Since foul I fare and painting is my shame.

This six-tile mural from the first half of the 20th century, depicts
Michelangelo’s magnificent Libyan Sibyl, Phemonoe, the daughter of Zeus and Poseidon’s daughter, Lamia. Phemonoe foretold the “coming of the day when that which is hidden shall be revealed”.

Each of the 6 tiles are 12″ x 12″, with the full image 36″ x 24″.  1st half, 20th century

I have also added a link to view the full ceiling.
https://upload.wikimedia.org/…/07/CAPPELLA_SISTINA_Ceiling.…

36 x 24 inches

91.44 x 60.96 cm

$3500




More items related to: , , ,

6-Tile Mural, Libyan Sibyl from Sistine Chapel

Michelangelo di Lodovico Buonarroti Simoni (1475-1564), universally known simply as Michelangelo, was arguably the greatest artist of all time. His sculpture of David is probably the most famous sculpture in the world and his frescoes on the ceiling of the Sistine Chapel are possibly man’s greatest achievement in the history of painting.

Despite his distaste for painting (he was a sculptor and considered painting to be less serious), he reluctantly accepted the commission of this arduous project from Pope Julius II in 1508. Painted between 1508 and 1512, the Sistine Chapel ceiling features 343 figures within more than 5000 square feet of painted ceiling.

Contrary to popular belief, Michelangelo did not paint the ceiling while laying on his back. Holes were drilled into the walls above the windows in the room from which brackets were placed to support a large flat scaffold on which he stood to paint. Even so, the work was physically demanding and Michelangelo wrote this amusing sonnet describing the results.
I’ve grown a goitre by dwelling in this den–
As cats from stagnant streams in Lombardy,
Or in what other land they hap to be–
Which drives the belly close beneath the chin:

My beard turns up to heaven; my nape falls in,
Fixed on my spine: my breast-bone visibly
Grows like a harp: a rich embroidery
Bedews my face from brush-drops thick and thin.

My loins into my paunch like levers grind:
My buttock like a crupper bears my weight;
My feet unguided wander to and fro;
In front my skin grows loose and long; behind,

By bending it becomes more taut and strait;
Crosswise I strain me like a Syrian bow:
Whence false and quaint, I know,
Must be the fruit of squinting brain and eye;

For ill can aim the gun that bends awry.
Come then, Giovanni, try
To succour my dead pictures and my fame;
Since foul I fare and painting is my shame.

This six-tile mural from the first half of the 20th century, depicts
Michelangelo’s magnificent Libyan Sibyl, Phemonoe, the daughter of Zeus and Poseidon’s daughter, Lamia. Phemonoe foretold the “coming of the day when that which is hidden shall be revealed”.

Each of the 6 tiles are 12″ x 12″, with the full image 36″ x 24″.  1st half, 20th century

I have also added a link to view the full ceiling.
https://upload.wikimedia.org/…/07/CAPPELLA_SISTINA_Ceiling.…

36 x 24 inches

91.44 x 60.96 cm

$3500




More items related to: , , ,

6-Tile Mural, Libyan Sibyl from Sistine Chapel

Michelangelo di Lodovico Buonarroti Simoni (1475-1564), universally known simply as Michelangelo, was arguably the greatest artist of all time. His sculpture of David is probably the most famous sculpture in the world and his frescoes on the ceiling of the Sistine Chapel are possibly man’s greatest achievement in the history of painting.

Despite his distaste for painting (he was a sculptor and considered painting to be less serious), he reluctantly accepted the commission of this arduous project from Pope Julius II in 1508. Painted between 1508 and 1512, the Sistine Chapel ceiling features 343 figures within more than 5000 square feet of painted ceiling.

Contrary to popular belief, Michelangelo did not paint the ceiling while laying on his back. Holes were drilled into the walls above the windows in the room from which brackets were placed to support a large flat scaffold on which he stood to paint. Even so, the work was physically demanding and Michelangelo wrote this amusing sonnet describing the results.
I’ve grown a goitre by dwelling in this den–
As cats from stagnant streams in Lombardy,
Or in what other land they hap to be–
Which drives the belly close beneath the chin:

My beard turns up to heaven; my nape falls in,
Fixed on my spine: my breast-bone visibly
Grows like a harp: a rich embroidery
Bedews my face from brush-drops thick and thin.

My loins into my paunch like levers grind:
My buttock like a crupper bears my weight;
My feet unguided wander to and fro;
In front my skin grows loose and long; behind,

By bending it becomes more taut and strait;
Crosswise I strain me like a Syrian bow:
Whence false and quaint, I know,
Must be the fruit of squinting brain and eye;

For ill can aim the gun that bends awry.
Come then, Giovanni, try
To succour my dead pictures and my fame;
Since foul I fare and painting is my shame.

This six-tile mural from the first half of the 20th century, depicts
Michelangelo’s magnificent Libyan Sibyl, Phemonoe, the daughter of Zeus and Poseidon’s daughter, Lamia. Phemonoe foretold the “coming of the day when that which is hidden shall be revealed”.

Each of the 6 tiles are 12″ x 12″, with the full image 36″ x 24″.  1st half, 20th century

I have also added a link to view the full ceiling.
https://upload.wikimedia.org/…/07/CAPPELLA_SISTINA_Ceiling.…

36 x 24 inches

91.44 x 60.96 cm

$3500




More items related to: , , ,

6-Tile Mural, Libyan Sibyl from Sistine Chapel

Michelangelo di Lodovico Buonarroti Simoni (1475-1564), universally known simply as Michelangelo, was arguably the greatest artist of all time. His sculpture of David is probably the most famous sculpture in the world and his frescoes on the ceiling of the Sistine Chapel are possibly man’s greatest achievement in the history of painting.

Despite his distaste for painting (he was a sculptor and considered painting to be less serious), he reluctantly accepted the commission of this arduous project from Pope Julius II in 1508. Painted between 1508 and 1512, the Sistine Chapel ceiling features 343 figures within more than 5000 square feet of painted ceiling.

Contrary to popular belief, Michelangelo did not paint the ceiling while laying on his back. Holes were drilled into the walls above the windows in the room from which brackets were placed to support a large flat scaffold on which he stood to paint. Even so, the work was physically demanding and Michelangelo wrote this amusing sonnet describing the results.
I’ve grown a goitre by dwelling in this den–
As cats from stagnant streams in Lombardy,
Or in what other land they hap to be–
Which drives the belly close beneath the chin:

My beard turns up to heaven; my nape falls in,
Fixed on my spine: my breast-bone visibly
Grows like a harp: a rich embroidery
Bedews my face from brush-drops thick and thin.

My loins into my paunch like levers grind:
My buttock like a crupper bears my weight;
My feet unguided wander to and fro;
In front my skin grows loose and long; behind,

By bending it becomes more taut and strait;
Crosswise I strain me like a Syrian bow:
Whence false and quaint, I know,
Must be the fruit of squinting brain and eye;

For ill can aim the gun that bends awry.
Come then, Giovanni, try
To succour my dead pictures and my fame;
Since foul I fare and painting is my shame.

This six-tile mural from the first half of the 20th century, depicts
Michelangelo’s magnificent Libyan Sibyl, Phemonoe, the daughter of Zeus and Poseidon’s daughter, Lamia. Phemonoe foretold the “coming of the day when that which is hidden shall be revealed”.

Each of the 6 tiles are 12″ x 12″, with the full image 36″ x 24″.  1st half, 20th century

I have also added a link to view the full ceiling.
https://upload.wikimedia.org/…/07/CAPPELLA_SISTINA_Ceiling.…

36 x 24 inches

91.44 x 60.96 cm

$3500




More items related to: , , ,

6-Tile Mural, Libyan Sibyl from Sistine Chapel

Michelangelo di Lodovico Buonarroti Simoni (1475-1564), universally known simply as Michelangelo, was arguably the greatest artist of all time. His sculpture of David is probably the most famous sculpture in the world and his frescoes on the ceiling of the Sistine Chapel are possibly man’s greatest achievement in the history of painting.

Despite his distaste for painting (he was a sculptor and considered painting to be less serious), he reluctantly accepted the commission of this arduous project from Pope Julius II in 1508. Painted between 1508 and 1512, the Sistine Chapel ceiling features 343 figures within more than 5000 square feet of painted ceiling.

Contrary to popular belief, Michelangelo did not paint the ceiling while laying on his back. Holes were drilled into the walls above the windows in the room from which brackets were placed to support a large flat scaffold on which he stood to paint. Even so, the work was physically demanding and Michelangelo wrote this amusing sonnet describing the results.
I’ve grown a goitre by dwelling in this den–
As cats from stagnant streams in Lombardy,
Or in what other land they hap to be–
Which drives the belly close beneath the chin:

My beard turns up to heaven; my nape falls in,
Fixed on my spine: my breast-bone visibly
Grows like a harp: a rich embroidery
Bedews my face from brush-drops thick and thin.

My loins into my paunch like levers grind:
My buttock like a crupper bears my weight;
My feet unguided wander to and fro;
In front my skin grows loose and long; behind,

By bending it becomes more taut and strait;
Crosswise I strain me like a Syrian bow:
Whence false and quaint, I know,
Must be the fruit of squinting brain and eye;

For ill can aim the gun that bends awry.
Come then, Giovanni, try
To succour my dead pictures and my fame;
Since foul I fare and painting is my shame.

This six-tile mural from the first half of the 20th century, depicts
Michelangelo’s magnificent Libyan Sibyl, Phemonoe, the daughter of Zeus and Poseidon’s daughter, Lamia. Phemonoe foretold the “coming of the day when that which is hidden shall be revealed”.

Each of the 6 tiles are 12″ x 12″, with the full image 36″ x 24″.  1st half, 20th century

I have also added a link to view the full ceiling.
https://upload.wikimedia.org/…/07/CAPPELLA_SISTINA_Ceiling.…

36 x 24 inches

91.44 x 60.96 cm

$3500




More items related to: , , ,

6-Tile Mural, Libyan Sibyl from Sistine Chapel

Michelangelo di Lodovico Buonarroti Simoni (1475-1564), universally known simply as Michelangelo, was arguably the greatest artist of all time. His sculpture of David is probably the most famous sculpture in the world and his frescoes on the ceiling of the Sistine Chapel are possibly man’s greatest achievement in the history of painting.

Despite his distaste for painting (he was a sculptor and considered painting to be less serious), he reluctantly accepted the commission of this arduous project from Pope Julius II in 1508. Painted between 1508 and 1512, the Sistine Chapel ceiling features 343 figures within more than 5000 square feet of painted ceiling.

Contrary to popular belief, Michelangelo did not paint the ceiling while laying on his back. Holes were drilled into the walls above the windows in the room from which brackets were placed to support a large flat scaffold on which he stood to paint. Even so, the work was physically demanding and Michelangelo wrote this amusing sonnet describing the results.
I’ve grown a goitre by dwelling in this den–
As cats from stagnant streams in Lombardy,
Or in what other land they hap to be–
Which drives the belly close beneath the chin:

My beard turns up to heaven; my nape falls in,
Fixed on my spine: my breast-bone visibly
Grows like a harp: a rich embroidery
Bedews my face from brush-drops thick and thin.

My loins into my paunch like levers grind:
My buttock like a crupper bears my weight;
My feet unguided wander to and fro;
In front my skin grows loose and long; behind,

By bending it becomes more taut and strait;
Crosswise I strain me like a Syrian bow:
Whence false and quaint, I know,
Must be the fruit of squinting brain and eye;

For ill can aim the gun that bends awry.
Come then, Giovanni, try
To succour my dead pictures and my fame;
Since foul I fare and painting is my shame.

This six-tile mural from the first half of the 20th century, depicts
Michelangelo’s magnificent Libyan Sibyl, Phemonoe, the daughter of Zeus and Poseidon’s daughter, Lamia. Phemonoe foretold the “coming of the day when that which is hidden shall be revealed”.

Each of the 6 tiles are 12″ x 12″, with the full image 36″ x 24″.  1st half, 20th century

I have also added a link to view the full ceiling.
https://upload.wikimedia.org/…/07/CAPPELLA_SISTINA_Ceiling.…

36 x 24 inches

91.44 x 60.96 cm

$3500




More items related to: , , ,

6-Tile Mural, Libyan Sibyl from Sistine Chapel

Michelangelo di Lodovico Buonarroti Simoni (1475-1564), universally known simply as Michelangelo, was arguably the greatest artist of all time. His sculpture of David is probably the most famous sculpture in the world and his frescoes on the ceiling of the Sistine Chapel are possibly man’s greatest achievement in the history of painting.

Despite his distaste for painting (he was a sculptor and considered painting to be less serious), he reluctantly accepted the commission of this arduous project from Pope Julius II in 1508. Painted between 1508 and 1512, the Sistine Chapel ceiling features 343 figures within more than 5000 square feet of painted ceiling.

Contrary to popular belief, Michelangelo did not paint the ceiling while laying on his back. Holes were drilled into the walls above the windows in the room from which brackets were placed to support a large flat scaffold on which he stood to paint. Even so, the work was physically demanding and Michelangelo wrote this amusing sonnet describing the results.
I’ve grown a goitre by dwelling in this den–
As cats from stagnant streams in Lombardy,
Or in what other land they hap to be–
Which drives the belly close beneath the chin:

My beard turns up to heaven; my nape falls in,
Fixed on my spine: my breast-bone visibly
Grows like a harp: a rich embroidery
Bedews my face from brush-drops thick and thin.

My loins into my paunch like levers grind:
My buttock like a crupper bears my weight;
My feet unguided wander to and fro;
In front my skin grows loose and long; behind,

By bending it becomes more taut and strait;
Crosswise I strain me like a Syrian bow:
Whence false and quaint, I know,
Must be the fruit of squinting brain and eye;

For ill can aim the gun that bends awry.
Come then, Giovanni, try
To succour my dead pictures and my fame;
Since foul I fare and painting is my shame.

This six-tile mural from the first half of the 20th century, depicts
Michelangelo’s magnificent Libyan Sibyl, Phemonoe, the daughter of Zeus and Poseidon’s daughter, Lamia. Phemonoe foretold the “coming of the day when that which is hidden shall be revealed”.

Each of the 6 tiles are 12″ x 12″, with the full image 36″ x 24″.  1st half, 20th century

I have also added a link to view the full ceiling.
https://upload.wikimedia.org/…/07/CAPPELLA_SISTINA_Ceiling.…

36 x 24 inches

91.44 x 60.96 cm

$3500




More items related to: , , ,

6-Tile Mural, Libyan Sibyl from Sistine Chapel

Michelangelo di Lodovico Buonarroti Simoni (1475-1564), universally known simply as Michelangelo, was arguably the greatest artist of all time. His sculpture of David is probably the most famous sculpture in the world and his frescoes on the ceiling of the Sistine Chapel are possibly man’s greatest achievement in the history of painting.

Despite his distaste for painting (he was a sculptor and considered painting to be less serious), he reluctantly accepted the commission of this arduous project from Pope Julius II in 1508. Painted between 1508 and 1512, the Sistine Chapel ceiling features 343 figures within more than 5000 square feet of painted ceiling.

Contrary to popular belief, Michelangelo did not paint the ceiling while laying on his back. Holes were drilled into the walls above the windows in the room from which brackets were placed to support a large flat scaffold on which he stood to paint. Even so, the work was physically demanding and Michelangelo wrote this amusing sonnet describing the results.
I’ve grown a goitre by dwelling in this den–
As cats from stagnant streams in Lombardy,
Or in what other land they hap to be–
Which drives the belly close beneath the chin:

My beard turns up to heaven; my nape falls in,
Fixed on my spine: my breast-bone visibly
Grows like a harp: a rich embroidery
Bedews my face from brush-drops thick and thin.

My loins into my paunch like levers grind:
My buttock like a crupper bears my weight;
My feet unguided wander to and fro;
In front my skin grows loose and long; behind,

By bending it becomes more taut and strait;
Crosswise I strain me like a Syrian bow:
Whence false and quaint, I know,
Must be the fruit of squinting brain and eye;

For ill can aim the gun that bends awry.
Come then, Giovanni, try
To succour my dead pictures and my fame;
Since foul I fare and painting is my shame.

This six-tile mural from the first half of the 20th century, depicts
Michelangelo’s magnificent Libyan Sibyl, Phemonoe, the daughter of Zeus and Poseidon’s daughter, Lamia. Phemonoe foretold the “coming of the day when that which is hidden shall be revealed”.

Each of the 6 tiles are 12″ x 12″, with the full image 36″ x 24″.  1st half, 20th century

I have also added a link to view the full ceiling.
https://upload.wikimedia.org/…/07/CAPPELLA_SISTINA_Ceiling.…

36 x 24 inches

91.44 x 60.96 cm

$3500




More items related to: , , ,

6-Tile Mural, Libyan Sibyl from Sistine Chapel

Michelangelo di Lodovico Buonarroti Simoni (1475-1564), universally known simply as Michelangelo, was arguably the greatest artist of all time. His sculpture of David is probably the most famous sculpture in the world and his frescoes on the ceiling of the Sistine Chapel are possibly man’s greatest achievement in the history of painting.

Despite his distaste for painting (he was a sculptor and considered painting to be less serious), he reluctantly accepted the commission of this arduous project from Pope Julius II in 1508. Painted between 1508 and 1512, the Sistine Chapel ceiling features 343 figures within more than 5000 square feet of painted ceiling.

Contrary to popular belief, Michelangelo did not paint the ceiling while laying on his back. Holes were drilled into the walls above the windows in the room from which brackets were placed to support a large flat scaffold on which he stood to paint. Even so, the work was physically demanding and Michelangelo wrote this amusing sonnet describing the results.
I’ve grown a goitre by dwelling in this den–
As cats from stagnant streams in Lombardy,
Or in what other land they hap to be–
Which drives the belly close beneath the chin:

My beard turns up to heaven; my nape falls in,
Fixed on my spine: my breast-bone visibly
Grows like a harp: a rich embroidery
Bedews my face from brush-drops thick and thin.

My loins into my paunch like levers grind:
My buttock like a crupper bears my weight;
My feet unguided wander to and fro;
In front my skin grows loose and long; behind,

By bending it becomes more taut and strait;
Crosswise I strain me like a Syrian bow:
Whence false and quaint, I know,
Must be the fruit of squinting brain and eye;

For ill can aim the gun that bends awry.
Come then, Giovanni, try
To succour my dead pictures and my fame;
Since foul I fare and painting is my shame.

This six-tile mural from the first half of the 20th century, depicts
Michelangelo’s magnificent Libyan Sibyl, Phemonoe, the daughter of Zeus and Poseidon’s daughter, Lamia. Phemonoe foretold the “coming of the day when that which is hidden shall be revealed”.

Each of the 6 tiles are 12″ x 12″, with the full image 36″ x 24″.  1st half, 20th century

I have also added a link to view the full ceiling.
https://upload.wikimedia.org/…/07/CAPPELLA_SISTINA_Ceiling.…

36 x 24 inches

91.44 x 60.96 cm

$3500




More items related to: , , ,

6-Tile Mural, Libyan Sibyl from Sistine Chapel

Michelangelo di Lodovico Buonarroti Simoni (1475-1564), universally known simply as Michelangelo, was arguably the greatest artist of all time. His sculpture of David is probably the most famous sculpture in the world and his frescoes on the ceiling of the Sistine Chapel are possibly man’s greatest achievement in the history of painting.

Despite his distaste for painting (he was a sculptor and considered painting to be less serious), he reluctantly accepted the commission of this arduous project from Pope Julius II in 1508. Painted between 1508 and 1512, the Sistine Chapel ceiling features 343 figures within more than 5000 square feet of painted ceiling.

Contrary to popular belief, Michelangelo did not paint the ceiling while laying on his back. Holes were drilled into the walls above the windows in the room from which brackets were placed to support a large flat scaffold on which he stood to paint. Even so, the work was physically demanding and Michelangelo wrote this amusing sonnet describing the results.
I’ve grown a goitre by dwelling in this den–
As cats from stagnant streams in Lombardy,
Or in what other land they hap to be–
Which drives the belly close beneath the chin:

My beard turns up to heaven; my nape falls in,
Fixed on my spine: my breast-bone visibly
Grows like a harp: a rich embroidery
Bedews my face from brush-drops thick and thin.

My loins into my paunch like levers grind:
My buttock like a crupper bears my weight;
My feet unguided wander to and fro;
In front my skin grows loose and long; behind,

By bending it becomes more taut and strait;
Crosswise I strain me like a Syrian bow:
Whence false and quaint, I know,
Must be the fruit of squinting brain and eye;

For ill can aim the gun that bends awry.
Come then, Giovanni, try
To succour my dead pictures and my fame;
Since foul I fare and painting is my shame.

This six-tile mural from the first half of the 20th century, depicts
Michelangelo’s magnificent Libyan Sibyl, Phemonoe, the daughter of Zeus and Poseidon’s daughter, Lamia. Phemonoe foretold the “coming of the day when that which is hidden shall be revealed”.

Each of the 6 tiles are 12″ x 12″, with the full image 36″ x 24″.  1st half, 20th century

I have also added a link to view the full ceiling.
https://upload.wikimedia.org/…/07/CAPPELLA_SISTINA_Ceiling.…

36 x 24 inches

91.44 x 60.96 cm

$3500




More items related to: , , ,

6-Tile Mural, Libyan Sibyl from Sistine Chapel

Michelangelo di Lodovico Buonarroti Simoni (1475-1564), universally known simply as Michelangelo, was arguably the greatest artist of all time. His sculpture of David is probably the most famous sculpture in the world and his frescoes on the ceiling of the Sistine Chapel are possibly man’s greatest achievement in the history of painting.

Despite his distaste for painting (he was a sculptor and considered painting to be less serious), he reluctantly accepted the commission of this arduous project from Pope Julius II in 1508. Painted between 1508 and 1512, the Sistine Chapel ceiling features 343 figures within more than 5000 square feet of painted ceiling.

Contrary to popular belief, Michelangelo did not paint the ceiling while laying on his back. Holes were drilled into the walls above the windows in the room from which brackets were placed to support a large flat scaffold on which he stood to paint. Even so, the work was physically demanding and Michelangelo wrote this amusing sonnet describing the results.
I’ve grown a goitre by dwelling in this den–
As cats from stagnant streams in Lombardy,
Or in what other land they hap to be–
Which drives the belly close beneath the chin:

My beard turns up to heaven; my nape falls in,
Fixed on my spine: my breast-bone visibly
Grows like a harp: a rich embroidery
Bedews my face from brush-drops thick and thin.

My loins into my paunch like levers grind:
My buttock like a crupper bears my weight;
My feet unguided wander to and fro;
In front my skin grows loose and long; behind,

By bending it becomes more taut and strait;
Crosswise I strain me like a Syrian bow:
Whence false and quaint, I know,
Must be the fruit of squinting brain and eye;

For ill can aim the gun that bends awry.
Come then, Giovanni, try
To succour my dead pictures and my fame;
Since foul I fare and painting is my shame.

This six-tile mural from the first half of the 20th century, depicts
Michelangelo’s magnificent Libyan Sibyl, Phemonoe, the daughter of Zeus and Poseidon’s daughter, Lamia. Phemonoe foretold the “coming of the day when that which is hidden shall be revealed”.

Each of the 6 tiles are 12″ x 12″, with the full image 36″ x 24″.  1st half, 20th century

I have also added a link to view the full ceiling.
https://upload.wikimedia.org/…/07/CAPPELLA_SISTINA_Ceiling.…

36 x 24 inches

91.44 x 60.96 cm

$3500




More items related to: , , ,

6-Tile Mural, Libyan Sibyl from Sistine Chapel

Michelangelo di Lodovico Buonarroti Simoni (1475-1564), universally known simply as Michelangelo, was arguably the greatest artist of all time. His sculpture of David is probably the most famous sculpture in the world and his frescoes on the ceiling of the Sistine Chapel are possibly man’s greatest achievement in the history of painting.

Despite his distaste for painting (he was a sculptor and considered painting to be less serious), he reluctantly accepted the commission of this arduous project from Pope Julius II in 1508. Painted between 1508 and 1512, the Sistine Chapel ceiling features 343 figures within more than 5000 square feet of painted ceiling.

Contrary to popular belief, Michelangelo did not paint the ceiling while laying on his back. Holes were drilled into the walls above the windows in the room from which brackets were placed to support a large flat scaffold on which he stood to paint. Even so, the work was physically demanding and Michelangelo wrote this amusing sonnet describing the results.
I’ve grown a goitre by dwelling in this den–
As cats from stagnant streams in Lombardy,
Or in what other land they hap to be–
Which drives the belly close beneath the chin:

My beard turns up to heaven; my nape falls in,
Fixed on my spine: my breast-bone visibly
Grows like a harp: a rich embroidery
Bedews my face from brush-drops thick and thin.

My loins into my paunch like levers grind:
My buttock like a crupper bears my weight;
My feet unguided wander to and fro;
In front my skin grows loose and long; behind,

By bending it becomes more taut and strait;
Crosswise I strain me like a Syrian bow:
Whence false and quaint, I know,
Must be the fruit of squinting brain and eye;

For ill can aim the gun that bends awry.
Come then, Giovanni, try
To succour my dead pictures and my fame;
Since foul I fare and painting is my shame.

This six-tile mural from the first half of the 20th century, depicts
Michelangelo’s magnificent Libyan Sibyl, Phemonoe, the daughter of Zeus and Poseidon’s daughter, Lamia. Phemonoe foretold the “coming of the day when that which is hidden shall be revealed”.

Each of the 6 tiles are 12″ x 12″, with the full image 36″ x 24″.  1st half, 20th century

I have also added a link to view the full ceiling.
https://upload.wikimedia.org/…/07/CAPPELLA_SISTINA_Ceiling.…

36 x 24 inches

91.44 x 60.96 cm

$3500




More items related to: , , ,

6-Tile Mural, Libyan Sibyl from Sistine Chapel

Michelangelo di Lodovico Buonarroti Simoni (1475-1564), universally known simply as Michelangelo, was arguably the greatest artist of all time. His sculpture of David is probably the most famous sculpture in the world and his frescoes on the ceiling of the Sistine Chapel are possibly man’s greatest achievement in the history of painting.

Despite his distaste for painting (he was a sculptor and considered painting to be less serious), he reluctantly accepted the commission of this arduous project from Pope Julius II in 1508. Painted between 1508 and 1512, the Sistine Chapel ceiling features 343 figures within more than 5000 square feet of painted ceiling.

Contrary to popular belief, Michelangelo did not paint the ceiling while laying on his back. Holes were drilled into the walls above the windows in the room from which brackets were placed to support a large flat scaffold on which he stood to paint. Even so, the work was physically demanding and Michelangelo wrote this amusing sonnet describing the results.
I’ve grown a goitre by dwelling in this den–
As cats from stagnant streams in Lombardy,
Or in what other land they hap to be–
Which drives the belly close beneath the chin:

My beard turns up to heaven; my nape falls in,
Fixed on my spine: my breast-bone visibly
Grows like a harp: a rich embroidery
Bedews my face from brush-drops thick and thin.

My loins into my paunch like levers grind:
My buttock like a crupper bears my weight;
My feet unguided wander to and fro;
In front my skin grows loose and long; behind,

By bending it becomes more taut and strait;
Crosswise I strain me like a Syrian bow:
Whence false and quaint, I know,
Must be the fruit of squinting brain and eye;

For ill can aim the gun that bends awry.
Come then, Giovanni, try
To succour my dead pictures and my fame;
Since foul I fare and painting is my shame.

This six-tile mural from the first half of the 20th century, depicts
Michelangelo’s magnificent Libyan Sibyl, Phemonoe, the daughter of Zeus and Poseidon’s daughter, Lamia. Phemonoe foretold the “coming of the day when that which is hidden shall be revealed”.

Each of the 6 tiles are 12″ x 12″, with the full image 36″ x 24″.  1st half, 20th century

I have also added a link to view the full ceiling.
https://upload.wikimedia.org/…/07/CAPPELLA_SISTINA_Ceiling.…

36 x 24 inches

91.44 x 60.96 cm

$3500




More items related to: , , ,

6-Tile Mural, Libyan Sibyl from Sistine Chapel

Michelangelo di Lodovico Buonarroti Simoni (1475-1564), universally known simply as Michelangelo, was arguably the greatest artist of all time. His sculpture of David is probably the most famous sculpture in the world and his frescoes on the ceiling of the Sistine Chapel are possibly man’s greatest achievement in the history of painting.

Despite his distaste for painting (he was a sculptor and considered painting to be less serious), he reluctantly accepted the commission of this arduous project from Pope Julius II in 1508. Painted between 1508 and 1512, the Sistine Chapel ceiling features 343 figures within more than 5000 square feet of painted ceiling.

Contrary to popular belief, Michelangelo did not paint the ceiling while laying on his back. Holes were drilled into the walls above the windows in the room from which brackets were placed to support a large flat scaffold on which he stood to paint. Even so, the work was physically demanding and Michelangelo wrote this amusing sonnet describing the results.
I’ve grown a goitre by dwelling in this den–
As cats from stagnant streams in Lombardy,
Or in what other land they hap to be–
Which drives the belly close beneath the chin:

My beard turns up to heaven; my nape falls in,
Fixed on my spine: my breast-bone visibly
Grows like a harp: a rich embroidery
Bedews my face from brush-drops thick and thin.

My loins into my paunch like levers grind:
My buttock like a crupper bears my weight;
My feet unguided wander to and fro;
In front my skin grows loose and long; behind,

By bending it becomes more taut and strait;
Crosswise I strain me like a Syrian bow:
Whence false and quaint, I know,
Must be the fruit of squinting brain and eye;

For ill can aim the gun that bends awry.
Come then, Giovanni, try
To succour my dead pictures and my fame;
Since foul I fare and painting is my shame.

This six-tile mural from the first half of the 20th century, depicts
Michelangelo’s magnificent Libyan Sibyl, Phemonoe, the daughter of Zeus and Poseidon’s daughter, Lamia. Phemonoe foretold the “coming of the day when that which is hidden shall be revealed”.

Each of the 6 tiles are 12″ x 12″, with the full image 36″ x 24″.  1st half, 20th century

I have also added a link to view the full ceiling.
https://upload.wikimedia.org/…/07/CAPPELLA_SISTINA_Ceiling.…

36 x 24 inches

91.44 x 60.96 cm

$3500




More items related to: , , ,

6-Tile Mural, Libyan Sibyl from Sistine Chapel

Michelangelo di Lodovico Buonarroti Simoni (1475-1564), universally known simply as Michelangelo, was arguably the greatest artist of all time. His sculpture of David is probably the most famous sculpture in the world and his frescoes on the ceiling of the Sistine Chapel are possibly man’s greatest achievement in the history of painting.

Despite his distaste for painting (he was a sculptor and considered painting to be less serious), he reluctantly accepted the commission of this arduous project from Pope Julius II in 1508. Painted between 1508 and 1512, the Sistine Chapel ceiling features 343 figures within more than 5000 square feet of painted ceiling.

Contrary to popular belief, Michelangelo did not paint the ceiling while laying on his back. Holes were drilled into the walls above the windows in the room from which brackets were placed to support a large flat scaffold on which he stood to paint. Even so, the work was physically demanding and Michelangelo wrote this amusing sonnet describing the results.
I’ve grown a goitre by dwelling in this den–
As cats from stagnant streams in Lombardy,
Or in what other land they hap to be–
Which drives the belly close beneath the chin:

My beard turns up to heaven; my nape falls in,
Fixed on my spine: my breast-bone visibly
Grows like a harp: a rich embroidery
Bedews my face from brush-drops thick and thin.

My loins into my paunch like levers grind:
My buttock like a crupper bears my weight;
My feet unguided wander to and fro;
In front my skin grows loose and long; behind,

By bending it becomes more taut and strait;
Crosswise I strain me like a Syrian bow:
Whence false and quaint, I know,
Must be the fruit of squinting brain and eye;

For ill can aim the gun that bends awry.
Come then, Giovanni, try
To succour my dead pictures and my fame;
Since foul I fare and painting is my shame.

This six-tile mural from the first half of the 20th century, depicts
Michelangelo’s magnificent Libyan Sibyl, Phemonoe, the daughter of Zeus and Poseidon’s daughter, Lamia. Phemonoe foretold the “coming of the day when that which is hidden shall be revealed”.

Each of the 6 tiles are 12″ x 12″, with the full image 36″ x 24″.  1st half, 20th century

I have also added a link to view the full ceiling.
https://upload.wikimedia.org/…/07/CAPPELLA_SISTINA_Ceiling.…

36 x 24 inches

91.44 x 60.96 cm

$3500




More items related to: , , ,

6-Tile Mural, Libyan Sibyl from Sistine Chapel

Michelangelo di Lodovico Buonarroti Simoni (1475-1564), universally known simply as Michelangelo, was arguably the greatest artist of all time. His sculpture of David is probably the most famous sculpture in the world and his frescoes on the ceiling of the Sistine Chapel are possibly man’s greatest achievement in the history of painting.

Despite his distaste for painting (he was a sculptor and considered painting to be less serious), he reluctantly accepted the commission of this arduous project from Pope Julius II in 1508. Painted between 1508 and 1512, the Sistine Chapel ceiling features 343 figures within more than 5000 square feet of painted ceiling.

Contrary to popular belief, Michelangelo did not paint the ceiling while laying on his back. Holes were drilled into the walls above the windows in the room from which brackets were placed to support a large flat scaffold on which he stood to paint. Even so, the work was physically demanding and Michelangelo wrote this amusing sonnet describing the results.
I’ve grown a goitre by dwelling in this den–
As cats from stagnant streams in Lombardy,
Or in what other land they hap to be–
Which drives the belly close beneath the chin:

My beard turns up to heaven; my nape falls in,
Fixed on my spine: my breast-bone visibly
Grows like a harp: a rich embroidery
Bedews my face from brush-drops thick and thin.

My loins into my paunch like levers grind:
My buttock like a crupper bears my weight;
My feet unguided wander to and fro;
In front my skin grows loose and long; behind,

By bending it becomes more taut and strait;
Crosswise I strain me like a Syrian bow:
Whence false and quaint, I know,
Must be the fruit of squinting brain and eye;

For ill can aim the gun that bends awry.
Come then, Giovanni, try
To succour my dead pictures and my fame;
Since foul I fare and painting is my shame.

This six-tile mural from the first half of the 20th century, depicts
Michelangelo’s magnificent Libyan Sibyl, Phemonoe, the daughter of Zeus and Poseidon’s daughter, Lamia. Phemonoe foretold the “coming of the day when that which is hidden shall be revealed”.

Each of the 6 tiles are 12″ x 12″, with the full image 36″ x 24″.  1st half, 20th century

I have also added a link to view the full ceiling.
https://upload.wikimedia.org/…/07/CAPPELLA_SISTINA_Ceiling.…

36 x 24 inches

91.44 x 60.96 cm

$3500




More items related to: , , ,

6-Tile Mural, Libyan Sibyl from Sistine Chapel

Michelangelo di Lodovico Buonarroti Simoni (1475-1564), universally known simply as Michelangelo, was arguably the greatest artist of all time. His sculpture of David is probably the most famous sculpture in the world and his frescoes on the ceiling of the Sistine Chapel are possibly man’s greatest achievement in the history of painting.

Despite his distaste for painting (he was a sculptor and considered painting to be less serious), he reluctantly accepted the commission of this arduous project from Pope Julius II in 1508. Painted between 1508 and 1512, the Sistine Chapel ceiling features 343 figures within more than 5000 square feet of painted ceiling.

Contrary to popular belief, Michelangelo did not paint the ceiling while laying on his back. Holes were drilled into the walls above the windows in the room from which brackets were placed to support a large flat scaffold on which he stood to paint. Even so, the work was physically demanding and Michelangelo wrote this amusing sonnet describing the results.
I’ve grown a goitre by dwelling in this den–
As cats from stagnant streams in Lombardy,
Or in what other land they hap to be–
Which drives the belly close beneath the chin:

My beard turns up to heaven; my nape falls in,
Fixed on my spine: my breast-bone visibly
Grows like a harp: a rich embroidery
Bedews my face from brush-drops thick and thin.

My loins into my paunch like levers grind:
My buttock like a crupper bears my weight;
My feet unguided wander to and fro;
In front my skin grows loose and long; behind,

By bending it becomes more taut and strait;
Crosswise I strain me like a Syrian bow:
Whence false and quaint, I know,
Must be the fruit of squinting brain and eye;

For ill can aim the gun that bends awry.
Come then, Giovanni, try
To succour my dead pictures and my fame;
Since foul I fare and painting is my shame.

This six-tile mural from the first half of the 20th century, depicts
Michelangelo’s magnificent Libyan Sibyl, Phemonoe, the daughter of Zeus and Poseidon’s daughter, Lamia. Phemonoe foretold the “coming of the day when that which is hidden shall be revealed”.

Each of the 6 tiles are 12″ x 12″, with the full image 36″ x 24″.  1st half, 20th century

I have also added a link to view the full ceiling.
https://upload.wikimedia.org/…/07/CAPPELLA_SISTINA_Ceiling.…

36 x 24 inches

91.44 x 60.96 cm

$3500




More items related to: , , ,

6-Tile Mural, Libyan Sibyl from Sistine Chapel

Michelangelo di Lodovico Buonarroti Simoni (1475-1564), universally known simply as Michelangelo, was arguably the greatest artist of all time. His sculpture of David is probably the most famous sculpture in the world and his frescoes on the ceiling of the Sistine Chapel are possibly man’s greatest achievement in the history of painting.

Despite his distaste for painting (he was a sculptor and considered painting to be less serious), he reluctantly accepted the commission of this arduous project from Pope Julius II in 1508. Painted between 1508 and 1512, the Sistine Chapel ceiling features 343 figures within more than 5000 square feet of painted ceiling.

Contrary to popular belief, Michelangelo did not paint the ceiling while laying on his back. Holes were drilled into the walls above the windows in the room from which brackets were placed to support a large flat scaffold on which he stood to paint. Even so, the work was physically demanding and Michelangelo wrote this amusing sonnet describing the results.
I’ve grown a goitre by dwelling in this den–
As cats from stagnant streams in Lombardy,
Or in what other land they hap to be–
Which drives the belly close beneath the chin:

My beard turns up to heaven; my nape falls in,
Fixed on my spine: my breast-bone visibly
Grows like a harp: a rich embroidery
Bedews my face from brush-drops thick and thin.

My loins into my paunch like levers grind:
My buttock like a crupper bears my weight;
My feet unguided wander to and fro;
In front my skin grows loose and long; behind,

By bending it becomes more taut and strait;
Crosswise I strain me like a Syrian bow:
Whence false and quaint, I know,
Must be the fruit of squinting brain and eye;

For ill can aim the gun that bends awry.
Come then, Giovanni, try
To succour my dead pictures and my fame;
Since foul I fare and painting is my shame.

This six-tile mural from the first half of the 20th century, depicts
Michelangelo’s magnificent Libyan Sibyl, Phemonoe, the daughter of Zeus and Poseidon’s daughter, Lamia. Phemonoe foretold the “coming of the day when that which is hidden shall be revealed”.

Each of the 6 tiles are 12″ x 12″, with the full image 36″ x 24″.  1st half, 20th century

I have also added a link to view the full ceiling.
https://upload.wikimedia.org/…/07/CAPPELLA_SISTINA_Ceiling.…

36 x 24 inches

91.44 x 60.96 cm

$3500




More items related to: , , ,

6-Tile Mural, Libyan Sibyl from Sistine Chapel

Michelangelo di Lodovico Buonarroti Simoni (1475-1564), universally known simply as Michelangelo, was arguably the greatest artist of all time. His sculpture of David is probably the most famous sculpture in the world and his frescoes on the ceiling of the Sistine Chapel are possibly man’s greatest achievement in the history of painting.

Despite his distaste for painting (he was a sculptor and considered painting to be less serious), he reluctantly accepted the commission of this arduous project from Pope Julius II in 1508. Painted between 1508 and 1512, the Sistine Chapel ceiling features 343 figures within more than 5000 square feet of painted ceiling.

Contrary to popular belief, Michelangelo did not paint the ceiling while laying on his back. Holes were drilled into the walls above the windows in the room from which brackets were placed to support a large flat scaffold on which he stood to paint. Even so, the work was physically demanding and Michelangelo wrote this amusing sonnet describing the results.
I’ve grown a goitre by dwelling in this den–
As cats from stagnant streams in Lombardy,
Or in what other land they hap to be–
Which drives the belly close beneath the chin:

My beard turns up to heaven; my nape falls in,
Fixed on my spine: my breast-bone visibly
Grows like a harp: a rich embroidery
Bedews my face from brush-drops thick and thin.

My loins into my paunch like levers grind:
My buttock like a crupper bears my weight;
My feet unguided wander to and fro;
In front my skin grows loose and long; behind,

By bending it becomes more taut and strait;
Crosswise I strain me like a Syrian bow:
Whence false and quaint, I know,
Must be the fruit of squinting brain and eye;

For ill can aim the gun that bends awry.
Come then, Giovanni, try
To succour my dead pictures and my fame;
Since foul I fare and painting is my shame.

This six-tile mural from the first half of the 20th century, depicts
Michelangelo’s magnificent Libyan Sibyl, Phemonoe, the daughter of Zeus and Poseidon’s daughter, Lamia. Phemonoe foretold the “coming of the day when that which is hidden shall be revealed”.

Each of the 6 tiles are 12″ x 12″, with the full image 36″ x 24″.  1st half, 20th century

I have also added a link to view the full ceiling.
https://upload.wikimedia.org/…/07/CAPPELLA_SISTINA_Ceiling.…

36 x 24 inches

91.44 x 60.96 cm

$3500




More items related to: , , ,

6-Tile Mural, Libyan Sibyl from Sistine Chapel

Michelangelo di Lodovico Buonarroti Simoni (1475-1564), universally known simply as Michelangelo, was arguably the greatest artist of all time. His sculpture of David is probably the most famous sculpture in the world and his frescoes on the ceiling of the Sistine Chapel are possibly man’s greatest achievement in the history of painting.

Despite his distaste for painting (he was a sculptor and considered painting to be less serious), he reluctantly accepted the commission of this arduous project from Pope Julius II in 1508. Painted between 1508 and 1512, the Sistine Chapel ceiling features 343 figures within more than 5000 square feet of painted ceiling.

Contrary to popular belief, Michelangelo did not paint the ceiling while laying on his back. Holes were drilled into the walls above the windows in the room from which brackets were placed to support a large flat scaffold on which he stood to paint. Even so, the work was physically demanding and Michelangelo wrote this amusing sonnet describing the results.
I’ve grown a goitre by dwelling in this den–
As cats from stagnant streams in Lombardy,
Or in what other land they hap to be–
Which drives the belly close beneath the chin:

My beard turns up to heaven; my nape falls in,
Fixed on my spine: my breast-bone visibly
Grows like a harp: a rich embroidery
Bedews my face from brush-drops thick and thin.

My loins into my paunch like levers grind:
My buttock like a crupper bears my weight;
My feet unguided wander to and fro;
In front my skin grows loose and long; behind,

By bending it becomes more taut and strait;
Crosswise I strain me like a Syrian bow:
Whence false and quaint, I know,
Must be the fruit of squinting brain and eye;

For ill can aim the gun that bends awry.
Come then, Giovanni, try
To succour my dead pictures and my fame;
Since foul I fare and painting is my shame.

This six-tile mural from the first half of the 20th century, depicts
Michelangelo’s magnificent Libyan Sibyl, Phemonoe, the daughter of Zeus and Poseidon’s daughter, Lamia. Phemonoe foretold the “coming of the day when that which is hidden shall be revealed”.

Each of the 6 tiles are 12″ x 12″, with the full image 36″ x 24″.  1st half, 20th century

I have also added a link to view the full ceiling.
https://upload.wikimedia.org/…/07/CAPPELLA_SISTINA_Ceiling.…

36 x 24 inches

91.44 x 60.96 cm

$3500




More items related to: , , ,

6-Tile Mural, Libyan Sibyl from Sistine Chapel

Michelangelo di Lodovico Buonarroti Simoni (1475-1564), universally known simply as Michelangelo, was arguably the greatest artist of all time. His sculpture of David is probably the most famous sculpture in the world and his frescoes on the ceiling of the Sistine Chapel are possibly man’s greatest achievement in the history of painting.

Despite his distaste for painting (he was a sculptor and considered painting to be less serious), he reluctantly accepted the commission of this arduous project from Pope Julius II in 1508. Painted between 1508 and 1512, the Sistine Chapel ceiling features 343 figures within more than 5000 square feet of painted ceiling.

Contrary to popular belief, Michelangelo did not paint the ceiling while laying on his back. Holes were drilled into the walls above the windows in the room from which brackets were placed to support a large flat scaffold on which he stood to paint. Even so, the work was physically demanding and Michelangelo wrote this amusing sonnet describing the results.
I’ve grown a goitre by dwelling in this den–
As cats from stagnant streams in Lombardy,
Or in what other land they hap to be–
Which drives the belly close beneath the chin:

My beard turns up to heaven; my nape falls in,
Fixed on my spine: my breast-bone visibly
Grows like a harp: a rich embroidery
Bedews my face from brush-drops thick and thin.

My loins into my paunch like levers grind:
My buttock like a crupper bears my weight;
My feet unguided wander to and fro;
In front my skin grows loose and long; behind,

By bending it becomes more taut and strait;
Crosswise I strain me like a Syrian bow:
Whence false and quaint, I know,
Must be the fruit of squinting brain and eye;

For ill can aim the gun that bends awry.
Come then, Giovanni, try
To succour my dead pictures and my fame;
Since foul I fare and painting is my shame.

This six-tile mural from the first half of the 20th century, depicts
Michelangelo’s magnificent Libyan Sibyl, Phemonoe, the daughter of Zeus and Poseidon’s daughter, Lamia. Phemonoe foretold the “coming of the day when that which is hidden shall be revealed”.

Each of the 6 tiles are 12″ x 12″, with the full image 36″ x 24″.  1st half, 20th century

I have also added a link to view the full ceiling.
https://upload.wikimedia.org/…/07/CAPPELLA_SISTINA_Ceiling.…

36 x 24 inches

91.44 x 60.96 cm

$3500




More items related to: , , ,

6-Tile Mural, Libyan Sibyl from Sistine Chapel

Michelangelo di Lodovico Buonarroti Simoni (1475-1564), universally known simply as Michelangelo, was arguably the greatest artist of all time. His sculpture of David is probably the most famous sculpture in the world and his frescoes on the ceiling of the Sistine Chapel are possibly man’s greatest achievement in the history of painting.

Despite his distaste for painting (he was a sculptor and considered painting to be less serious), he reluctantly accepted the commission of this arduous project from Pope Julius II in 1508. Painted between 1508 and 1512, the Sistine Chapel ceiling features 343 figures within more than 5000 square feet of painted ceiling.

Contrary to popular belief, Michelangelo did not paint the ceiling while laying on his back. Holes were drilled into the walls above the windows in the room from which brackets were placed to support a large flat scaffold on which he stood to paint. Even so, the work was physically demanding and Michelangelo wrote this amusing sonnet describing the results.
I’ve grown a goitre by dwelling in this den–
As cats from stagnant streams in Lombardy,
Or in what other land they hap to be–
Which drives the belly close beneath the chin:

My beard turns up to heaven; my nape falls in,
Fixed on my spine: my breast-bone visibly
Grows like a harp: a rich embroidery
Bedews my face from brush-drops thick and thin.

My loins into my paunch like levers grind:
My buttock like a crupper bears my weight;
My feet unguided wander to and fro;
In front my skin grows loose and long; behind,

By bending it becomes more taut and strait;
Crosswise I strain me like a Syrian bow:
Whence false and quaint, I know,
Must be the fruit of squinting brain and eye;

For ill can aim the gun that bends awry.
Come then, Giovanni, try
To succour my dead pictures and my fame;
Since foul I fare and painting is my shame.

This six-tile mural from the first half of the 20th century, depicts
Michelangelo’s magnificent Libyan Sibyl, Phemonoe, the daughter of Zeus and Poseidon’s daughter, Lamia. Phemonoe foretold the “coming of the day when that which is hidden shall be revealed”.

Each of the 6 tiles are 12″ x 12″, with the full image 36″ x 24″.  1st half, 20th century

I have also added a link to view the full ceiling.
https://upload.wikimedia.org/…/07/CAPPELLA_SISTINA_Ceiling.…

36 x 24 inches

91.44 x 60.96 cm

$3500




More items related to: , , ,

6-Tile Mural, Libyan Sibyl from Sistine Chapel

Michelangelo di Lodovico Buonarroti Simoni (1475-1564), universally known simply as Michelangelo, was arguably the greatest artist of all time. His sculpture of David is probably the most famous sculpture in the world and his frescoes on the ceiling of the Sistine Chapel are possibly man’s greatest achievement in the history of painting.

Despite his distaste for painting (he was a sculptor and considered painting to be less serious), he reluctantly accepted the commission of this arduous project from Pope Julius II in 1508. Painted between 1508 and 1512, the Sistine Chapel ceiling features 343 figures within more than 5000 square feet of painted ceiling.

Contrary to popular belief, Michelangelo did not paint the ceiling while laying on his back. Holes were drilled into the walls above the windows in the room from which brackets were placed to support a large flat scaffold on which he stood to paint. Even so, the work was physically demanding and Michelangelo wrote this amusing sonnet describing the results.
I’ve grown a goitre by dwelling in this den–
As cats from stagnant streams in Lombardy,
Or in what other land they hap to be–
Which drives the belly close beneath the chin:

My beard turns up to heaven; my nape falls in,
Fixed on my spine: my breast-bone visibly
Grows like a harp: a rich embroidery
Bedews my face from brush-drops thick and thin.

My loins into my paunch like levers grind:
My buttock like a crupper bears my weight;
My feet unguided wander to and fro;
In front my skin grows loose and long; behind,

By bending it becomes more taut and strait;
Crosswise I strain me like a Syrian bow:
Whence false and quaint, I know,
Must be the fruit of squinting brain and eye;

For ill can aim the gun that bends awry.
Come then, Giovanni, try
To succour my dead pictures and my fame;
Since foul I fare and painting is my shame.

This six-tile mural from the first half of the 20th century, depicts
Michelangelo’s magnificent Libyan Sibyl, Phemonoe, the daughter of Zeus and Poseidon’s daughter, Lamia. Phemonoe foretold the “coming of the day when that which is hidden shall be revealed”.

Each of the 6 tiles are 12″ x 12″, with the full image 36″ x 24″.  1st half, 20th century

I have also added a link to view the full ceiling.
https://upload.wikimedia.org/…/07/CAPPELLA_SISTINA_Ceiling.…

36 x 24 inches

91.44 x 60.96 cm

$3500




More items related to: , , ,

6-Tile Mural, Libyan Sibyl from Sistine Chapel

Michelangelo di Lodovico Buonarroti Simoni (1475-1564), universally known simply as Michelangelo, was arguably the greatest artist of all time. His sculpture of David is probably the most famous sculpture in the world and his frescoes on the ceiling of the Sistine Chapel are possibly man’s greatest achievement in the history of painting.

Despite his distaste for painting (he was a sculptor and considered painting to be less serious), he reluctantly accepted the commission of this arduous project from Pope Julius II in 1508. Painted between 1508 and 1512, the Sistine Chapel ceiling features 343 figures within more than 5000 square feet of painted ceiling.

Contrary to popular belief, Michelangelo did not paint the ceiling while laying on his back. Holes were drilled into the walls above the windows in the room from which brackets were placed to support a large flat scaffold on which he stood to paint. Even so, the work was physically demanding and Michelangelo wrote this amusing sonnet describing the results.
I’ve grown a goitre by dwelling in this den–
As cats from stagnant streams in Lombardy,
Or in what other land they hap to be–
Which drives the belly close beneath the chin:

My beard turns up to heaven; my nape falls in,
Fixed on my spine: my breast-bone visibly
Grows like a harp: a rich embroidery
Bedews my face from brush-drops thick and thin.

My loins into my paunch like levers grind:
My buttock like a crupper bears my weight;
My feet unguided wander to and fro;
In front my skin grows loose and long; behind,

By bending it becomes more taut and strait;
Crosswise I strain me like a Syrian bow:
Whence false and quaint, I know,
Must be the fruit of squinting brain and eye;

For ill can aim the gun that bends awry.
Come then, Giovanni, try
To succour my dead pictures and my fame;
Since foul I fare and painting is my shame.

This six-tile mural from the first half of the 20th century, depicts
Michelangelo’s magnificent Libyan Sibyl, Phemonoe, the daughter of Zeus and Poseidon’s daughter, Lamia. Phemonoe foretold the “coming of the day when that which is hidden shall be revealed”.

Each of the 6 tiles are 12″ x 12″, with the full image 36″ x 24″.  1st half, 20th century

I have also added a link to view the full ceiling.
https://upload.wikimedia.org/…/07/CAPPELLA_SISTINA_Ceiling.…

36 x 24 inches

91.44 x 60.96 cm

$3500




More items related to: , , ,

6-Tile Mural, Libyan Sibyl from Sistine Chapel

Michelangelo di Lodovico Buonarroti Simoni (1475-1564), universally known simply as Michelangelo, was arguably the greatest artist of all time. His sculpture of David is probably the most famous sculpture in the world and his frescoes on the ceiling of the Sistine Chapel are possibly man’s greatest achievement in the history of painting.

Despite his distaste for painting (he was a sculptor and considered painting to be less serious), he reluctantly accepted the commission of this arduous project from Pope Julius II in 1508. Painted between 1508 and 1512, the Sistine Chapel ceiling features 343 figures within more than 5000 square feet of painted ceiling.

Contrary to popular belief, Michelangelo did not paint the ceiling while laying on his back. Holes were drilled into the walls above the windows in the room from which brackets were placed to support a large flat scaffold on which he stood to paint. Even so, the work was physically demanding and Michelangelo wrote this amusing sonnet describing the results.
I’ve grown a goitre by dwelling in this den–
As cats from stagnant streams in Lombardy,
Or in what other land they hap to be–
Which drives the belly close beneath the chin:

My beard turns up to heaven; my nape falls in,
Fixed on my spine: my breast-bone visibly
Grows like a harp: a rich embroidery
Bedews my face from brush-drops thick and thin.

My loins into my paunch like levers grind:
My buttock like a crupper bears my weight;
My feet unguided wander to and fro;
In front my skin grows loose and long; behind,

By bending it becomes more taut and strait;
Crosswise I strain me like a Syrian bow:
Whence false and quaint, I know,
Must be the fruit of squinting brain and eye;

For ill can aim the gun that bends awry.
Come then, Giovanni, try
To succour my dead pictures and my fame;
Since foul I fare and painting is my shame.

This six-tile mural from the first half of the 20th century, depicts
Michelangelo’s magnificent Libyan Sibyl, Phemonoe, the daughter of Zeus and Poseidon’s daughter, Lamia. Phemonoe foretold the “coming of the day when that which is hidden shall be revealed”.

Each of the 6 tiles are 12″ x 12″, with the full image 36″ x 24″.  1st half, 20th century

I have also added a link to view the full ceiling.
https://upload.wikimedia.org/…/07/CAPPELLA_SISTINA_Ceiling.…

36 x 24 inches

91.44 x 60.96 cm

$3500




More items related to: , , ,

6-Tile Mural, Libyan Sibyl from Sistine Chapel

Michelangelo di Lodovico Buonarroti Simoni (1475-1564), universally known simply as Michelangelo, was arguably the greatest artist of all time. His sculpture of David is probably the most famous sculpture in the world and his frescoes on the ceiling of the Sistine Chapel are possibly man’s greatest achievement in the history of painting.

Despite his distaste for painting (he was a sculptor and considered painting to be less serious), he reluctantly accepted the commission of this arduous project from Pope Julius II in 1508. Painted between 1508 and 1512, the Sistine Chapel ceiling features 343 figures within more than 5000 square feet of painted ceiling.

Contrary to popular belief, Michelangelo did not paint the ceiling while laying on his back. Holes were drilled into the walls above the windows in the room from which brackets were placed to support a large flat scaffold on which he stood to paint. Even so, the work was physically demanding and Michelangelo wrote this amusing sonnet describing the results.
I’ve grown a goitre by dwelling in this den–
As cats from stagnant streams in Lombardy,
Or in what other land they hap to be–
Which drives the belly close beneath the chin:

My beard turns up to heaven; my nape falls in,
Fixed on my spine: my breast-bone visibly
Grows like a harp: a rich embroidery
Bedews my face from brush-drops thick and thin.

My loins into my paunch like levers grind:
My buttock like a crupper bears my weight;
My feet unguided wander to and fro;
In front my skin grows loose and long; behind,

By bending it becomes more taut and strait;
Crosswise I strain me like a Syrian bow:
Whence false and quaint, I know,
Must be the fruit of squinting brain and eye;

For ill can aim the gun that bends awry.
Come then, Giovanni, try
To succour my dead pictures and my fame;
Since foul I fare and painting is my shame.

This six-tile mural from the first half of the 20th century, depicts
Michelangelo’s magnificent Libyan Sibyl, Phemonoe, the daughter of Zeus and Poseidon’s daughter, Lamia. Phemonoe foretold the “coming of the day when that which is hidden shall be revealed”.

Each of the 6 tiles are 12″ x 12″, with the full image 36″ x 24″.  1st half, 20th century

I have also added a link to view the full ceiling.
https://upload.wikimedia.org/…/07/CAPPELLA_SISTINA_Ceiling.…

36 x 24 inches

91.44 x 60.96 cm

$3500




More items related to: , , ,

6-Tile Mural, Libyan Sibyl from Sistine Chapel

Michelangelo di Lodovico Buonarroti Simoni (1475-1564), universally known simply as Michelangelo, was arguably the greatest artist of all time. His sculpture of David is probably the most famous sculpture in the world and his frescoes on the ceiling of the Sistine Chapel are possibly man’s greatest achievement in the history of painting.

Despite his distaste for painting (he was a sculptor and considered painting to be less serious), he reluctantly accepted the commission of this arduous project from Pope Julius II in 1508. Painted between 1508 and 1512, the Sistine Chapel ceiling features 343 figures within more than 5000 square feet of painted ceiling.

Contrary to popular belief, Michelangelo did not paint the ceiling while laying on his back. Holes were drilled into the walls above the windows in the room from which brackets were placed to support a large flat scaffold on which he stood to paint. Even so, the work was physically demanding and Michelangelo wrote this amusing sonnet describing the results.
I’ve grown a goitre by dwelling in this den–
As cats from stagnant streams in Lombardy,
Or in what other land they hap to be–
Which drives the belly close beneath the chin:

My beard turns up to heaven; my nape falls in,
Fixed on my spine: my breast-bone visibly
Grows like a harp: a rich embroidery
Bedews my face from brush-drops thick and thin.

My loins into my paunch like levers grind:
My buttock like a crupper bears my weight;
My feet unguided wander to and fro;
In front my skin grows loose and long; behind,

By bending it becomes more taut and strait;
Crosswise I strain me like a Syrian bow:
Whence false and quaint, I know,
Must be the fruit of squinting brain and eye;

For ill can aim the gun that bends awry.
Come then, Giovanni, try
To succour my dead pictures and my fame;
Since foul I fare and painting is my shame.

This six-tile mural from the first half of the 20th century, depicts
Michelangelo’s magnificent Libyan Sibyl, Phemonoe, the daughter of Zeus and Poseidon’s daughter, Lamia. Phemonoe foretold the “coming of the day when that which is hidden shall be revealed”.

Each of the 6 tiles are 12″ x 12″, with the full image 36″ x 24″.  1st half, 20th century

I have also added a link to view the full ceiling.
https://upload.wikimedia.org/…/07/CAPPELLA_SISTINA_Ceiling.…

36 x 24 inches

91.44 x 60.96 cm

$3500




More items related to: , , ,

6-Tile Mural, Libyan Sibyl from Sistine Chapel

Michelangelo di Lodovico Buonarroti Simoni (1475-1564), universally known simply as Michelangelo, was arguably the greatest artist of all time. His sculpture of David is probably the most famous sculpture in the world and his frescoes on the ceiling of the Sistine Chapel are possibly man’s greatest achievement in the history of painting.

Despite his distaste for painting (he was a sculptor and considered painting to be less serious), he reluctantly accepted the commission of this arduous project from Pope Julius II in 1508. Painted between 1508 and 1512, the Sistine Chapel ceiling features 343 figures within more than 5000 square feet of painted ceiling.

Contrary to popular belief, Michelangelo did not paint the ceiling while laying on his back. Holes were drilled into the walls above the windows in the room from which brackets were placed to support a large flat scaffold on which he stood to paint. Even so, the work was physically demanding and Michelangelo wrote this amusing sonnet describing the results.
I’ve grown a goitre by dwelling in this den–
As cats from stagnant streams in Lombardy,
Or in what other land they hap to be–
Which drives the belly close beneath the chin:

My beard turns up to heaven; my nape falls in,
Fixed on my spine: my breast-bone visibly
Grows like a harp: a rich embroidery
Bedews my face from brush-drops thick and thin.

My loins into my paunch like levers grind:
My buttock like a crupper bears my weight;
My feet unguided wander to and fro;
In front my skin grows loose and long; behind,

By bending it becomes more taut and strait;
Crosswise I strain me like a Syrian bow:
Whence false and quaint, I know,
Must be the fruit of squinting brain and eye;

For ill can aim the gun that bends awry.
Come then, Giovanni, try
To succour my dead pictures and my fame;
Since foul I fare and painting is my shame.

This six-tile mural from the first half of the 20th century, depicts
Michelangelo’s magnificent Libyan Sibyl, Phemonoe, the daughter of Zeus and Poseidon’s daughter, Lamia. Phemonoe foretold the “coming of the day when that which is hidden shall be revealed”.

Each of the 6 tiles are 12″ x 12″, with the full image 36″ x 24″.  1st half, 20th century

I have also added a link to view the full ceiling.
https://upload.wikimedia.org/…/07/CAPPELLA_SISTINA_Ceiling.…

36 x 24 inches

91.44 x 60.96 cm

$3500




More items related to: , , ,

6-Tile Mural, Libyan Sibyl from Sistine Chapel

Michelangelo di Lodovico Buonarroti Simoni (1475-1564), universally known simply as Michelangelo, was arguably the greatest artist of all time. His sculpture of David is probably the most famous sculpture in the world and his frescoes on the ceiling of the Sistine Chapel are possibly man’s greatest achievement in the history of painting.

Despite his distaste for painting (he was a sculptor and considered painting to be less serious), he reluctantly accepted the commission of this arduous project from Pope Julius II in 1508. Painted between 1508 and 1512, the Sistine Chapel ceiling features 343 figures within more than 5000 square feet of painted ceiling.

Contrary to popular belief, Michelangelo did not paint the ceiling while laying on his back. Holes were drilled into the walls above the windows in the room from which brackets were placed to support a large flat scaffold on which he stood to paint. Even so, the work was physically demanding and Michelangelo wrote this amusing sonnet describing the results.
I’ve grown a goitre by dwelling in this den–
As cats from stagnant streams in Lombardy,
Or in what other land they hap to be–
Which drives the belly close beneath the chin:

My beard turns up to heaven; my nape falls in,
Fixed on my spine: my breast-bone visibly
Grows like a harp: a rich embroidery
Bedews my face from brush-drops thick and thin.

My loins into my paunch like levers grind:
My buttock like a crupper bears my weight;
My feet unguided wander to and fro;
In front my skin grows loose and long; behind,

By bending it becomes more taut and strait;
Crosswise I strain me like a Syrian bow:
Whence false and quaint, I know,
Must be the fruit of squinting brain and eye;

For ill can aim the gun that bends awry.
Come then, Giovanni, try
To succour my dead pictures and my fame;
Since foul I fare and painting is my shame.

This six-tile mural from the first half of the 20th century, depicts
Michelangelo’s magnificent Libyan Sibyl, Phemonoe, the daughter of Zeus and Poseidon’s daughter, Lamia. Phemonoe foretold the “coming of the day when that which is hidden shall be revealed”.

Each of the 6 tiles are 12″ x 12″, with the full image 36″ x 24″.  1st half, 20th century

I have also added a link to view the full ceiling.
https://upload.wikimedia.org/…/07/CAPPELLA_SISTINA_Ceiling.…

36 x 24 inches

91.44 x 60.96 cm

$3500




More items related to: , , ,

6-Tile Mural, Libyan Sibyl from Sistine Chapel

Michelangelo di Lodovico Buonarroti Simoni (1475-1564), universally known simply as Michelangelo, was arguably the greatest artist of all time. His sculpture of David is probably the most famous sculpture in the world and his frescoes on the ceiling of the Sistine Chapel are possibly man’s greatest achievement in the history of painting.

Despite his distaste for painting (he was a sculptor and considered painting to be less serious), he reluctantly accepted the commission of this arduous project from Pope Julius II in 1508. Painted between 1508 and 1512, the Sistine Chapel ceiling features 343 figures within more than 5000 square feet of painted ceiling.

Contrary to popular belief, Michelangelo did not paint the ceiling while laying on his back. Holes were drilled into the walls above the windows in the room from which brackets were placed to support a large flat scaffold on which he stood to paint. Even so, the work was physically demanding and Michelangelo wrote this amusing sonnet describing the results.
I’ve grown a goitre by dwelling in this den–
As cats from stagnant streams in Lombardy,
Or in what other land they hap to be–
Which drives the belly close beneath the chin:

My beard turns up to heaven; my nape falls in,
Fixed on my spine: my breast-bone visibly
Grows like a harp: a rich embroidery
Bedews my face from brush-drops thick and thin.

My loins into my paunch like levers grind:
My buttock like a crupper bears my weight;
My feet unguided wander to and fro;
In front my skin grows loose and long; behind,

By bending it becomes more taut and strait;
Crosswise I strain me like a Syrian bow:
Whence false and quaint, I know,
Must be the fruit of squinting brain and eye;

For ill can aim the gun that bends awry.
Come then, Giovanni, try
To succour my dead pictures and my fame;
Since foul I fare and painting is my shame.

This six-tile mural from the first half of the 20th century, depicts
Michelangelo’s magnificent Libyan Sibyl, Phemonoe, the daughter of Zeus and Poseidon’s daughter, Lamia. Phemonoe foretold the “coming of the day when that which is hidden shall be revealed”.

Each of the 6 tiles are 12″ x 12″, with the full image 36″ x 24″.  1st half, 20th century

I have also added a link to view the full ceiling.
https://upload.wikimedia.org/…/07/CAPPELLA_SISTINA_Ceiling.…

36 x 24 inches

91.44 x 60.96 cm

$3500




More items related to: , , ,

6-Tile Mural, Libyan Sibyl from Sistine Chapel

Michelangelo di Lodovico Buonarroti Simoni (1475-1564), universally known simply as Michelangelo, was arguably the greatest artist of all time. His sculpture of David is probably the most famous sculpture in the world and his frescoes on the ceiling of the Sistine Chapel are possibly man’s greatest achievement in the history of painting.

Despite his distaste for painting (he was a sculptor and considered painting to be less serious), he reluctantly accepted the commission of this arduous project from Pope Julius II in 1508. Painted between 1508 and 1512, the Sistine Chapel ceiling features 343 figures within more than 5000 square feet of painted ceiling.

Contrary to popular belief, Michelangelo did not paint the ceiling while laying on his back. Holes were drilled into the walls above the windows in the room from which brackets were placed to support a large flat scaffold on which he stood to paint. Even so, the work was physically demanding and Michelangelo wrote this amusing sonnet describing the results.
I’ve grown a goitre by dwelling in this den–
As cats from stagnant streams in Lombardy,
Or in what other land they hap to be–
Which drives the belly close beneath the chin:

My beard turns up to heaven; my nape falls in,
Fixed on my spine: my breast-bone visibly
Grows like a harp: a rich embroidery
Bedews my face from brush-drops thick and thin.

My loins into my paunch like levers grind:
My buttock like a crupper bears my weight;
My feet unguided wander to and fro;
In front my skin grows loose and long; behind,

By bending it becomes more taut and strait;
Crosswise I strain me like a Syrian bow:
Whence false and quaint, I know,
Must be the fruit of squinting brain and eye;

For ill can aim the gun that bends awry.
Come then, Giovanni, try
To succour my dead pictures and my fame;
Since foul I fare and painting is my shame.

This six-tile mural from the first half of the 20th century, depicts
Michelangelo’s magnificent Libyan Sibyl, Phemonoe, the daughter of Zeus and Poseidon’s daughter, Lamia. Phemonoe foretold the “coming of the day when that which is hidden shall be revealed”.

Each of the 6 tiles are 12″ x 12″, with the full image 36″ x 24″.  1st half, 20th century

I have also added a link to view the full ceiling.
https://upload.wikimedia.org/…/07/CAPPELLA_SISTINA_Ceiling.…

36 x 24 inches

91.44 x 60.96 cm

$3500




More items related to: , , ,

6-Tile Mural, Libyan Sibyl from Sistine Chapel

Michelangelo di Lodovico Buonarroti Simoni (1475-1564), universally known simply as Michelangelo, was arguably the greatest artist of all time. His sculpture of David is probably the most famous sculpture in the world and his frescoes on the ceiling of the Sistine Chapel are possibly man’s greatest achievement in the history of painting.

Despite his distaste for painting (he was a sculptor and considered painting to be less serious), he reluctantly accepted the commission of this arduous project from Pope Julius II in 1508. Painted between 1508 and 1512, the Sistine Chapel ceiling features 343 figures within more than 5000 square feet of painted ceiling.

Contrary to popular belief, Michelangelo did not paint the ceiling while laying on his back. Holes were drilled into the walls above the windows in the room from which brackets were placed to support a large flat scaffold on which he stood to paint. Even so, the work was physically demanding and Michelangelo wrote this amusing sonnet describing the results.
I’ve grown a goitre by dwelling in this den–
As cats from stagnant streams in Lombardy,
Or in what other land they hap to be–
Which drives the belly close beneath the chin:

My beard turns up to heaven; my nape falls in,
Fixed on my spine: my breast-bone visibly
Grows like a harp: a rich embroidery
Bedews my face from brush-drops thick and thin.

My loins into my paunch like levers grind:
My buttock like a crupper bears my weight;
My feet unguided wander to and fro;
In front my skin grows loose and long; behind,

By bending it becomes more taut and strait;
Crosswise I strain me like a Syrian bow:
Whence false and quaint, I know,
Must be the fruit of squinting brain and eye;

For ill can aim the gun that bends awry.
Come then, Giovanni, try
To succour my dead pictures and my fame;
Since foul I fare and painting is my shame.

This six-tile mural from the first half of the 20th century, depicts
Michelangelo’s magnificent Libyan Sibyl, Phemonoe, the daughter of Zeus and Poseidon’s daughter, Lamia. Phemonoe foretold the “coming of the day when that which is hidden shall be revealed”.

Each of the 6 tiles are 12″ x 12″, with the full image 36″ x 24″.  1st half, 20th century

I have also added a link to view the full ceiling.
https://upload.wikimedia.org/…/07/CAPPELLA_SISTINA_Ceiling.…

36 x 24 inches

91.44 x 60.96 cm

$3500




More items related to: , , ,

6-Tile Mural, Libyan Sibyl from Sistine Chapel

Michelangelo di Lodovico Buonarroti Simoni (1475-1564), universally known simply as Michelangelo, was arguably the greatest artist of all time. His sculpture of David is probably the most famous sculpture in the world and his frescoes on the ceiling of the Sistine Chapel are possibly man’s greatest achievement in the history of painting.

Despite his distaste for painting (he was a sculptor and considered painting to be less serious), he reluctantly accepted the commission of this arduous project from Pope Julius II in 1508. Painted between 1508 and 1512, the Sistine Chapel ceiling features 343 figures within more than 5000 square feet of painted ceiling.

Contrary to popular belief, Michelangelo did not paint the ceiling while laying on his back. Holes were drilled into the walls above the windows in the room from which brackets were placed to support a large flat scaffold on which he stood to paint. Even so, the work was physically demanding and Michelangelo wrote this amusing sonnet describing the results.
I’ve grown a goitre by dwelling in this den–
As cats from stagnant streams in Lombardy,
Or in what other land they hap to be–
Which drives the belly close beneath the chin:

My beard turns up to heaven; my nape falls in,
Fixed on my spine: my breast-bone visibly
Grows like a harp: a rich embroidery
Bedews my face from brush-drops thick and thin.

My loins into my paunch like levers grind:
My buttock like a crupper bears my weight;
My feet unguided wander to and fro;
In front my skin grows loose and long; behind,

By bending it becomes more taut and strait;
Crosswise I strain me like a Syrian bow:
Whence false and quaint, I know,
Must be the fruit of squinting brain and eye;

For ill can aim the gun that bends awry.
Come then, Giovanni, try
To succour my dead pictures and my fame;
Since foul I fare and painting is my shame.

This six-tile mural from the first half of the 20th century, depicts
Michelangelo’s magnificent Libyan Sibyl, Phemonoe, the daughter of Zeus and Poseidon’s daughter, Lamia. Phemonoe foretold the “coming of the day when that which is hidden shall be revealed”.

Each of the 6 tiles are 12″ x 12″, with the full image 36″ x 24″.  1st half, 20th century

I have also added a link to view the full ceiling.
https://upload.wikimedia.org/…/07/CAPPELLA_SISTINA_Ceiling.…

36 x 24 inches

91.44 x 60.96 cm

$3500




More items related to: , , ,

6-Tile Mural, Libyan Sibyl from Sistine Chapel

Michelangelo di Lodovico Buonarroti Simoni (1475-1564), universally known simply as Michelangelo, was arguably the greatest artist of all time. His sculpture of David is probably the most famous sculpture in the world and his frescoes on the ceiling of the Sistine Chapel are possibly man’s greatest achievement in the history of painting.

Despite his distaste for painting (he was a sculptor and considered painting to be less serious), he reluctantly accepted the commission of this arduous project from Pope Julius II in 1508. Painted between 1508 and 1512, the Sistine Chapel ceiling features 343 figures within more than 5000 square feet of painted ceiling.

Contrary to popular belief, Michelangelo did not paint the ceiling while laying on his back. Holes were drilled into the walls above the windows in the room from which brackets were placed to support a large flat scaffold on which he stood to paint. Even so, the work was physically demanding and Michelangelo wrote this amusing sonnet describing the results.
I’ve grown a goitre by dwelling in this den–
As cats from stagnant streams in Lombardy,
Or in what other land they hap to be–
Which drives the belly close beneath the chin:

My beard turns up to heaven; my nape falls in,
Fixed on my spine: my breast-bone visibly
Grows like a harp: a rich embroidery
Bedews my face from brush-drops thick and thin.

My loins into my paunch like levers grind:
My buttock like a crupper bears my weight;
My feet unguided wander to and fro;
In front my skin grows loose and long; behind,

By bending it becomes more taut and strait;
Crosswise I strain me like a Syrian bow:
Whence false and quaint, I know,
Must be the fruit of squinting brain and eye;

For ill can aim the gun that bends awry.
Come then, Giovanni, try
To succour my dead pictures and my fame;
Since foul I fare and painting is my shame.

This six-tile mural from the first half of the 20th century, depicts
Michelangelo’s magnificent Libyan Sibyl, Phemonoe, the daughter of Zeus and Poseidon’s daughter, Lamia. Phemonoe foretold the “coming of the day when that which is hidden shall be revealed”.

Each of the 6 tiles are 12″ x 12″, with the full image 36″ x 24″.  1st half, 20th century

I have also added a link to view the full ceiling.
https://upload.wikimedia.org/…/07/CAPPELLA_SISTINA_Ceiling.…

36 x 24 inches

91.44 x 60.96 cm

$3500




More items related to: , , ,

6-Tile Mural, Libyan Sibyl from Sistine Chapel

Michelangelo di Lodovico Buonarroti Simoni (1475-1564), universally known simply as Michelangelo, was arguably the greatest artist of all time. His sculpture of David is probably the most famous sculpture in the world and his frescoes on the ceiling of the Sistine Chapel are possibly man’s greatest achievement in the history of painting.

Despite his distaste for painting (he was a sculptor and considered painting to be less serious), he reluctantly accepted the commission of this arduous project from Pope Julius II in 1508. Painted between 1508 and 1512, the Sistine Chapel ceiling features 343 figures within more than 5000 square feet of painted ceiling.

Contrary to popular belief, Michelangelo did not paint the ceiling while laying on his back. Holes were drilled into the walls above the windows in the room from which brackets were placed to support a large flat scaffold on which he stood to paint. Even so, the work was physically demanding and Michelangelo wrote this amusing sonnet describing the results.
I’ve grown a goitre by dwelling in this den–
As cats from stagnant streams in Lombardy,
Or in what other land they hap to be–
Which drives the belly close beneath the chin:

My beard turns up to heaven; my nape falls in,
Fixed on my spine: my breast-bone visibly
Grows like a harp: a rich embroidery
Bedews my face from brush-drops thick and thin.

My loins into my paunch like levers grind:
My buttock like a crupper bears my weight;
My feet unguided wander to and fro;
In front my skin grows loose and long; behind,

By bending it becomes more taut and strait;
Crosswise I strain me like a Syrian bow:
Whence false and quaint, I know,
Must be the fruit of squinting brain and eye;

For ill can aim the gun that bends awry.
Come then, Giovanni, try
To succour my dead pictures and my fame;
Since foul I fare and painting is my shame.

This six-tile mural from the first half of the 20th century, depicts
Michelangelo’s magnificent Libyan Sibyl, Phemonoe, the daughter of Zeus and Poseidon’s daughter, Lamia. Phemonoe foretold the “coming of the day when that which is hidden shall be revealed”.

Each of the 6 tiles are 12″ x 12″, with the full image 36″ x 24″.  1st half, 20th century

I have also added a link to view the full ceiling.
https://upload.wikimedia.org/…/07/CAPPELLA_SISTINA_Ceiling.…

36 x 24 inches

91.44 x 60.96 cm

$3500




More items related to: , , ,

6-Tile Mural, Libyan Sibyl from Sistine Chapel

Michelangelo di Lodovico Buonarroti Simoni (1475-1564), universally known simply as Michelangelo, was arguably the greatest artist of all time. His sculpture of David is probably the most famous sculpture in the world and his frescoes on the ceiling of the Sistine Chapel are possibly man’s greatest achievement in the history of painting.

Despite his distaste for painting (he was a sculptor and considered painting to be less serious), he reluctantly accepted the commission of this arduous project from Pope Julius II in 1508. Painted between 1508 and 1512, the Sistine Chapel ceiling features 343 figures within more than 5000 square feet of painted ceiling.

Contrary to popular belief, Michelangelo did not paint the ceiling while laying on his back. Holes were drilled into the walls above the windows in the room from which brackets were placed to support a large flat scaffold on which he stood to paint. Even so, the work was physically demanding and Michelangelo wrote this amusing sonnet describing the results.
I’ve grown a goitre by dwelling in this den–
As cats from stagnant streams in Lombardy,
Or in what other land they hap to be–
Which drives the belly close beneath the chin:

My beard turns up to heaven; my nape falls in,
Fixed on my spine: my breast-bone visibly
Grows like a harp: a rich embroidery
Bedews my face from brush-drops thick and thin.

My loins into my paunch like levers grind:
My buttock like a crupper bears my weight;
My feet unguided wander to and fro;
In front my skin grows loose and long; behind,

By bending it becomes more taut and strait;
Crosswise I strain me like a Syrian bow:
Whence false and quaint, I know,
Must be the fruit of squinting brain and eye;

For ill can aim the gun that bends awry.
Come then, Giovanni, try
To succour my dead pictures and my fame;
Since foul I fare and painting is my shame.

This six-tile mural from the first half of the 20th century, depicts
Michelangelo’s magnificent Libyan Sibyl, Phemonoe, the daughter of Zeus and Poseidon’s daughter, Lamia. Phemonoe foretold the “coming of the day when that which is hidden shall be revealed”.

Each of the 6 tiles are 12″ x 12″, with the full image 36″ x 24″.  1st half, 20th century

I have also added a link to view the full ceiling.
https://upload.wikimedia.org/…/07/CAPPELLA_SISTINA_Ceiling.…

36 x 24 inches

91.44 x 60.96 cm

$3500




More items related to: , , ,

6-Tile Mural, Libyan Sibyl from Sistine Chapel

Michelangelo di Lodovico Buonarroti Simoni (1475-1564), universally known simply as Michelangelo, was arguably the greatest artist of all time. His sculpture of David is probably the most famous sculpture in the world and his frescoes on the ceiling of the Sistine Chapel are possibly man’s greatest achievement in the history of painting.

Despite his distaste for painting (he was a sculptor and considered painting to be less serious), he reluctantly accepted the commission of this arduous project from Pope Julius II in 1508. Painted between 1508 and 1512, the Sistine Chapel ceiling features 343 figures within more than 5000 square feet of painted ceiling.

Contrary to popular belief, Michelangelo did not paint the ceiling while laying on his back. Holes were drilled into the walls above the windows in the room from which brackets were placed to support a large flat scaffold on which he stood to paint. Even so, the work was physically demanding and Michelangelo wrote this amusing sonnet describing the results.
I’ve grown a goitre by dwelling in this den–
As cats from stagnant streams in Lombardy,
Or in what other land they hap to be–
Which drives the belly close beneath the chin:

My beard turns up to heaven; my nape falls in,
Fixed on my spine: my breast-bone visibly
Grows like a harp: a rich embroidery
Bedews my face from brush-drops thick and thin.

My loins into my paunch like levers grind:
My buttock like a crupper bears my weight;
My feet unguided wander to and fro;
In front my skin grows loose and long; behind,

By bending it becomes more taut and strait;
Crosswise I strain me like a Syrian bow:
Whence false and quaint, I know,
Must be the fruit of squinting brain and eye;

For ill can aim the gun that bends awry.
Come then, Giovanni, try
To succour my dead pictures and my fame;
Since foul I fare and painting is my shame.

This six-tile mural from the first half of the 20th century, depicts
Michelangelo’s magnificent Libyan Sibyl, Phemonoe, the daughter of Zeus and Poseidon’s daughter, Lamia. Phemonoe foretold the “coming of the day when that which is hidden shall be revealed”.

Each of the 6 tiles are 12″ x 12″, with the full image 36″ x 24″.  1st half, 20th century

I have also added a link to view the full ceiling.
https://upload.wikimedia.org/…/07/CAPPELLA_SISTINA_Ceiling.…

36 x 24 inches

91.44 x 60.96 cm

$3500




More items related to: , , ,

6-Tile Mural, Libyan Sibyl from Sistine Chapel

Michelangelo di Lodovico Buonarroti Simoni (1475-1564), universally known simply as Michelangelo, was arguably the greatest artist of all time. His sculpture of David is probably the most famous sculpture in the world and his frescoes on the ceiling of the Sistine Chapel are possibly man’s greatest achievement in the history of painting.

Despite his distaste for painting (he was a sculptor and considered painting to be less serious), he reluctantly accepted the commission of this arduous project from Pope Julius II in 1508. Painted between 1508 and 1512, the Sistine Chapel ceiling features 343 figures within more than 5000 square feet of painted ceiling.

Contrary to popular belief, Michelangelo did not paint the ceiling while laying on his back. Holes were drilled into the walls above the windows in the room from which brackets were placed to support a large flat scaffold on which he stood to paint. Even so, the work was physically demanding and Michelangelo wrote this amusing sonnet describing the results.
I’ve grown a goitre by dwelling in this den–
As cats from stagnant streams in Lombardy,
Or in what other land they hap to be–
Which drives the belly close beneath the chin:

My beard turns up to heaven; my nape falls in,
Fixed on my spine: my breast-bone visibly
Grows like a harp: a rich embroidery
Bedews my face from brush-drops thick and thin.

My loins into my paunch like levers grind:
My buttock like a crupper bears my weight;
My feet unguided wander to and fro;
In front my skin grows loose and long; behind,

By bending it becomes more taut and strait;
Crosswise I strain me like a Syrian bow:
Whence false and quaint, I know,
Must be the fruit of squinting brain and eye;

For ill can aim the gun that bends awry.
Come then, Giovanni, try
To succour my dead pictures and my fame;
Since foul I fare and painting is my shame.

This six-tile mural from the first half of the 20th century, depicts
Michelangelo’s magnificent Libyan Sibyl, Phemonoe, the daughter of Zeus and Poseidon’s daughter, Lamia. Phemonoe foretold the “coming of the day when that which is hidden shall be revealed”.

Each of the 6 tiles are 12″ x 12″, with the full image 36″ x 24″.  1st half, 20th century

I have also added a link to view the full ceiling.
https://upload.wikimedia.org/…/07/CAPPELLA_SISTINA_Ceiling.…

36 x 24 inches

91.44 x 60.96 cm

$3500




More items related to: , , ,

6-Tile Mural, Libyan Sibyl from Sistine Chapel

Michelangelo di Lodovico Buonarroti Simoni (1475-1564), universally known simply as Michelangelo, was arguably the greatest artist of all time. His sculpture of David is probably the most famous sculpture in the world and his frescoes on the ceiling of the Sistine Chapel are possibly man’s greatest achievement in the history of painting.

Despite his distaste for painting (he was a sculptor and considered painting to be less serious), he reluctantly accepted the commission of this arduous project from Pope Julius II in 1508. Painted between 1508 and 1512, the Sistine Chapel ceiling features 343 figures within more than 5000 square feet of painted ceiling.

Contrary to popular belief, Michelangelo did not paint the ceiling while laying on his back. Holes were drilled into the walls above the windows in the room from which brackets were placed to support a large flat scaffold on which he stood to paint. Even so, the work was physically demanding and Michelangelo wrote this amusing sonnet describing the results.
I’ve grown a goitre by dwelling in this den–
As cats from stagnant streams in Lombardy,
Or in what other land they hap to be–
Which drives the belly close beneath the chin:

My beard turns up to heaven; my nape falls in,
Fixed on my spine: my breast-bone visibly
Grows like a harp: a rich embroidery
Bedews my face from brush-drops thick and thin.

My loins into my paunch like levers grind:
My buttock like a crupper bears my weight;
My feet unguided wander to and fro;
In front my skin grows loose and long; behind,

By bending it becomes more taut and strait;
Crosswise I strain me like a Syrian bow:
Whence false and quaint, I know,
Must be the fruit of squinting brain and eye;

For ill can aim the gun that bends awry.
Come then, Giovanni, try
To succour my dead pictures and my fame;
Since foul I fare and painting is my shame.

This six-tile mural from the first half of the 20th century, depicts
Michelangelo’s magnificent Libyan Sibyl, Phemonoe, the daughter of Zeus and Poseidon’s daughter, Lamia. Phemonoe foretold the “coming of the day when that which is hidden shall be revealed”.

Each of the 6 tiles are 12″ x 12″, with the full image 36″ x 24″.  1st half, 20th century

I have also added a link to view the full ceiling.
https://upload.wikimedia.org/…/07/CAPPELLA_SISTINA_Ceiling.…

36 x 24 inches

91.44 x 60.96 cm

$3500




More items related to: , , ,

6-Tile Mural, Libyan Sibyl from Sistine Chapel

Michelangelo di Lodovico Buonarroti Simoni (1475-1564), universally known simply as Michelangelo, was arguably the greatest artist of all time. His sculpture of David is probably the most famous sculpture in the world and his frescoes on the ceiling of the Sistine Chapel are possibly man’s greatest achievement in the history of painting.

Despite his distaste for painting (he was a sculptor and considered painting to be less serious), he reluctantly accepted the commission of this arduous project from Pope Julius II in 1508. Painted between 1508 and 1512, the Sistine Chapel ceiling features 343 figures within more than 5000 square feet of painted ceiling.

Contrary to popular belief, Michelangelo did not paint the ceiling while laying on his back. Holes were drilled into the walls above the windows in the room from which brackets were placed to support a large flat scaffold on which he stood to paint. Even so, the work was physically demanding and Michelangelo wrote this amusing sonnet describing the results.
I’ve grown a goitre by dwelling in this den–
As cats from stagnant streams in Lombardy,
Or in what other land they hap to be–
Which drives the belly close beneath the chin:

My beard turns up to heaven; my nape falls in,
Fixed on my spine: my breast-bone visibly
Grows like a harp: a rich embroidery
Bedews my face from brush-drops thick and thin.

My loins into my paunch like levers grind:
My buttock like a crupper bears my weight;
My feet unguided wander to and fro;
In front my skin grows loose and long; behind,

By bending it becomes more taut and strait;
Crosswise I strain me like a Syrian bow:
Whence false and quaint, I know,
Must be the fruit of squinting brain and eye;

For ill can aim the gun that bends awry.
Come then, Giovanni, try
To succour my dead pictures and my fame;
Since foul I fare and painting is my shame.

This six-tile mural from the first half of the 20th century, depicts
Michelangelo’s magnificent Libyan Sibyl, Phemonoe, the daughter of Zeus and Poseidon’s daughter, Lamia. Phemonoe foretold the “coming of the day when that which is hidden shall be revealed”.

Each of the 6 tiles are 12″ x 12″, with the full image 36″ x 24″.  1st half, 20th century

I have also added a link to view the full ceiling.
https://upload.wikimedia.org/…/07/CAPPELLA_SISTINA_Ceiling.…

36 x 24 inches

91.44 x 60.96 cm

$3500




More items related to: , , ,

6-Tile Mural, Libyan Sibyl from Sistine Chapel

Michelangelo di Lodovico Buonarroti Simoni (1475-1564), universally known simply as Michelangelo, was arguably the greatest artist of all time. His sculpture of David is probably the most famous sculpture in the world and his frescoes on the ceiling of the Sistine Chapel are possibly man’s greatest achievement in the history of painting.

Despite his distaste for painting (he was a sculptor and considered painting to be less serious), he reluctantly accepted the commission of this arduous project from Pope Julius II in 1508. Painted between 1508 and 1512, the Sistine Chapel ceiling features 343 figures within more than 5000 square feet of painted ceiling.

Contrary to popular belief, Michelangelo did not paint the ceiling while laying on his back. Holes were drilled into the walls above the windows in the room from which brackets were placed to support a large flat scaffold on which he stood to paint. Even so, the work was physically demanding and Michelangelo wrote this amusing sonnet describing the results.
I’ve grown a goitre by dwelling in this den–
As cats from stagnant streams in Lombardy,
Or in what other land they hap to be–
Which drives the belly close beneath the chin:

My beard turns up to heaven; my nape falls in,
Fixed on my spine: my breast-bone visibly
Grows like a harp: a rich embroidery
Bedews my face from brush-drops thick and thin.

My loins into my paunch like levers grind:
My buttock like a crupper bears my weight;
My feet unguided wander to and fro;
In front my skin grows loose and long; behind,

By bending it becomes more taut and strait;
Crosswise I strain me like a Syrian bow:
Whence false and quaint, I know,
Must be the fruit of squinting brain and eye;

For ill can aim the gun that bends awry.
Come then, Giovanni, try
To succour my dead pictures and my fame;
Since foul I fare and painting is my shame.

This six-tile mural from the first half of the 20th century, depicts
Michelangelo’s magnificent Libyan Sibyl, Phemonoe, the daughter of Zeus and Poseidon’s daughter, Lamia. Phemonoe foretold the “coming of the day when that which is hidden shall be revealed”.

Each of the 6 tiles are 12″ x 12″, with the full image 36″ x 24″.  1st half, 20th century

I have also added a link to view the full ceiling.
https://upload.wikimedia.org/…/07/CAPPELLA_SISTINA_Ceiling.…

36 x 24 inches

91.44 x 60.96 cm

$3500




More items related to: , , ,

6-Tile Mural, Libyan Sibyl from Sistine Chapel

Michelangelo di Lodovico Buonarroti Simoni (1475-1564), universally known simply as Michelangelo, was arguably the greatest artist of all time. His sculpture of David is probably the most famous sculpture in the world and his frescoes on the ceiling of the Sistine Chapel are possibly man’s greatest achievement in the history of painting.

Despite his distaste for painting (he was a sculptor and considered painting to be less serious), he reluctantly accepted the commission of this arduous project from Pope Julius II in 1508. Painted between 1508 and 1512, the Sistine Chapel ceiling features 343 figures within more than 5000 square feet of painted ceiling.

Contrary to popular belief, Michelangelo did not paint the ceiling while laying on his back. Holes were drilled into the walls above the windows in the room from which brackets were placed to support a large flat scaffold on which he stood to paint. Even so, the work was physically demanding and Michelangelo wrote this amusing sonnet describing the results.
I’ve grown a goitre by dwelling in this den–
As cats from stagnant streams in Lombardy,
Or in what other land they hap to be–
Which drives the belly close beneath the chin:

My beard turns up to heaven; my nape falls in,
Fixed on my spine: my breast-bone visibly
Grows like a harp: a rich embroidery
Bedews my face from brush-drops thick and thin.

My loins into my paunch like levers grind:
My buttock like a crupper bears my weight;
My feet unguided wander to and fro;
In front my skin grows loose and long; behind,

By bending it becomes more taut and strait;
Crosswise I strain me like a Syrian bow:
Whence false and quaint, I know,
Must be the fruit of squinting brain and eye;

For ill can aim the gun that bends awry.
Come then, Giovanni, try
To succour my dead pictures and my fame;
Since foul I fare and painting is my shame.

This six-tile mural from the first half of the 20th century, depicts
Michelangelo’s magnificent Libyan Sibyl, Phemonoe, the daughter of Zeus and Poseidon’s daughter, Lamia. Phemonoe foretold the “coming of the day when that which is hidden shall be revealed”.

Each of the 6 tiles are 12″ x 12″, with the full image 36″ x 24″.  1st half, 20th century

I have also added a link to view the full ceiling.
https://upload.wikimedia.org/…/07/CAPPELLA_SISTINA_Ceiling.…

36 x 24 inches

91.44 x 60.96 cm

$3500




More items related to: , , ,

6-Tile Mural, Libyan Sibyl from Sistine Chapel

Michelangelo di Lodovico Buonarroti Simoni (1475-1564), universally known simply as Michelangelo, was arguably the greatest artist of all time. His sculpture of David is probably the most famous sculpture in the world and his frescoes on the ceiling of the Sistine Chapel are possibly man’s greatest achievement in the history of painting.

Despite his distaste for painting (he was a sculptor and considered painting to be less serious), he reluctantly accepted the commission of this arduous project from Pope Julius II in 1508. Painted between 1508 and 1512, the Sistine Chapel ceiling features 343 figures within more than 5000 square feet of painted ceiling.

Contrary to popular belief, Michelangelo did not paint the ceiling while laying on his back. Holes were drilled into the walls above the windows in the room from which brackets were placed to support a large flat scaffold on which he stood to paint. Even so, the work was physically demanding and Michelangelo wrote this amusing sonnet describing the results.
I’ve grown a goitre by dwelling in this den–
As cats from stagnant streams in Lombardy,
Or in what other land they hap to be–
Which drives the belly close beneath the chin:

My beard turns up to heaven; my nape falls in,
Fixed on my spine: my breast-bone visibly
Grows like a harp: a rich embroidery
Bedews my face from brush-drops thick and thin.

My loins into my paunch like levers grind:
My buttock like a crupper bears my weight;
My feet unguided wander to and fro;
In front my skin grows loose and long; behind,

By bending it becomes more taut and strait;
Crosswise I strain me like a Syrian bow:
Whence false and quaint, I know,
Must be the fruit of squinting brain and eye;

For ill can aim the gun that bends awry.
Come then, Giovanni, try
To succour my dead pictures and my fame;
Since foul I fare and painting is my shame.

This six-tile mural from the first half of the 20th century, depicts
Michelangelo’s magnificent Libyan Sibyl, Phemonoe, the daughter of Zeus and Poseidon’s daughter, Lamia. Phemonoe foretold the “coming of the day when that which is hidden shall be revealed”.

Each of the 6 tiles are 12″ x 12″, with the full image 36″ x 24″.  1st half, 20th century

I have also added a link to view the full ceiling.
https://upload.wikimedia.org/…/07/CAPPELLA_SISTINA_Ceiling.…

36 x 24 inches

91.44 x 60.96 cm

$3500




More items related to: , , ,

6-Tile Mural, Libyan Sibyl from Sistine Chapel

Michelangelo di Lodovico Buonarroti Simoni (1475-1564), universally known simply as Michelangelo, was arguably the greatest artist of all time. His sculpture of David is probably the most famous sculpture in the world and his frescoes on the ceiling of the Sistine Chapel are possibly man’s greatest achievement in the history of painting.

Despite his distaste for painting (he was a sculptor and considered painting to be less serious), he reluctantly accepted the commission of this arduous project from Pope Julius II in 1508. Painted between 1508 and 1512, the Sistine Chapel ceiling features 343 figures within more than 5000 square feet of painted ceiling.

Contrary to popular belief, Michelangelo did not paint the ceiling while laying on his back. Holes were drilled into the walls above the windows in the room from which brackets were placed to support a large flat scaffold on which he stood to paint. Even so, the work was physically demanding and Michelangelo wrote this amusing sonnet describing the results.
I’ve grown a goitre by dwelling in this den–
As cats from stagnant streams in Lombardy,
Or in what other land they hap to be–
Which drives the belly close beneath the chin:

My beard turns up to heaven; my nape falls in,
Fixed on my spine: my breast-bone visibly
Grows like a harp: a rich embroidery
Bedews my face from brush-drops thick and thin.

My loins into my paunch like levers grind:
My buttock like a crupper bears my weight;
My feet unguided wander to and fro;
In front my skin grows loose and long; behind,

By bending it becomes more taut and strait;
Crosswise I strain me like a Syrian bow:
Whence false and quaint, I know,
Must be the fruit of squinting brain and eye;

For ill can aim the gun that bends awry.
Come then, Giovanni, try
To succour my dead pictures and my fame;
Since foul I fare and painting is my shame.

This six-tile mural from the first half of the 20th century, depicts
Michelangelo’s magnificent Libyan Sibyl, Phemonoe, the daughter of Zeus and Poseidon’s daughter, Lamia. Phemonoe foretold the “coming of the day when that which is hidden shall be revealed”.

Each of the 6 tiles are 12″ x 12″, with the full image 36″ x 24″.  1st half, 20th century

I have also added a link to view the full ceiling.
https://upload.wikimedia.org/…/07/CAPPELLA_SISTINA_Ceiling.…

36 x 24 inches

91.44 x 60.96 cm

$3500




More items related to: , , ,

6-Tile Mural, Libyan Sibyl from Sistine Chapel

Michelangelo di Lodovico Buonarroti Simoni (1475-1564), universally known simply as Michelangelo, was arguably the greatest artist of all time. His sculpture of David is probably the most famous sculpture in the world and his frescoes on the ceiling of the Sistine Chapel are possibly man’s greatest achievement in the history of painting.

Despite his distaste for painting (he was a sculptor and considered painting to be less serious), he reluctantly accepted the commission of this arduous project from Pope Julius II in 1508. Painted between 1508 and 1512, the Sistine Chapel ceiling features 343 figures within more than 5000 square feet of painted ceiling.

Contrary to popular belief, Michelangelo did not paint the ceiling while laying on his back. Holes were drilled into the walls above the windows in the room from which brackets were placed to support a large flat scaffold on which he stood to paint. Even so, the work was physically demanding and Michelangelo wrote this amusing sonnet describing the results.
I’ve grown a goitre by dwelling in this den–
As cats from stagnant streams in Lombardy,
Or in what other land they hap to be–
Which drives the belly close beneath the chin:

My beard turns up to heaven; my nape falls in,
Fixed on my spine: my breast-bone visibly
Grows like a harp: a rich embroidery
Bedews my face from brush-drops thick and thin.

My loins into my paunch like levers grind:
My buttock like a crupper bears my weight;
My feet unguided wander to and fro;
In front my skin grows loose and long; behind,

By bending it becomes more taut and strait;
Crosswise I strain me like a Syrian bow:
Whence false and quaint, I know,
Must be the fruit of squinting brain and eye;

For ill can aim the gun that bends awry.
Come then, Giovanni, try
To succour my dead pictures and my fame;
Since foul I fare and painting is my shame.

This six-tile mural from the first half of the 20th century, depicts
Michelangelo’s magnificent Libyan Sibyl, Phemonoe, the daughter of Zeus and Poseidon’s daughter, Lamia. Phemonoe foretold the “coming of the day when that which is hidden shall be revealed”.

Each of the 6 tiles are 12″ x 12″, with the full image 36″ x 24″.  1st half, 20th century

I have also added a link to view the full ceiling.
https://upload.wikimedia.org/…/07/CAPPELLA_SISTINA_Ceiling.…

36 x 24 inches

91.44 x 60.96 cm

$3500




More items related to: , , ,

6-Tile Mural, Libyan Sibyl from Sistine Chapel

Michelangelo di Lodovico Buonarroti Simoni (1475-1564), universally known simply as Michelangelo, was arguably the greatest artist of all time. His sculpture of David is probably the most famous sculpture in the world and his frescoes on the ceiling of the Sistine Chapel are possibly man’s greatest achievement in the history of painting.

Despite his distaste for painting (he was a sculptor and considered painting to be less serious), he reluctantly accepted the commission of this arduous project from Pope Julius II in 1508. Painted between 1508 and 1512, the Sistine Chapel ceiling features 343 figures within more than 5000 square feet of painted ceiling.

Contrary to popular belief, Michelangelo did not paint the ceiling while laying on his back. Holes were drilled into the walls above the windows in the room from which brackets were placed to support a large flat scaffold on which he stood to paint. Even so, the work was physically demanding and Michelangelo wrote this amusing sonnet describing the results.
I’ve grown a goitre by dwelling in this den–
As cats from stagnant streams in Lombardy,
Or in what other land they hap to be–
Which drives the belly close beneath the chin:

My beard turns up to heaven; my nape falls in,
Fixed on my spine: my breast-bone visibly
Grows like a harp: a rich embroidery
Bedews my face from brush-drops thick and thin.

My loins into my paunch like levers grind:
My buttock like a crupper bears my weight;
My feet unguided wander to and fro;
In front my skin grows loose and long; behind,

By bending it becomes more taut and strait;
Crosswise I strain me like a Syrian bow:
Whence false and quaint, I know,
Must be the fruit of squinting brain and eye;

For ill can aim the gun that bends awry.
Come then, Giovanni, try
To succour my dead pictures and my fame;
Since foul I fare and painting is my shame.

This six-tile mural from the first half of the 20th century, depicts
Michelangelo’s magnificent Libyan Sibyl, Phemonoe, the daughter of Zeus and Poseidon’s daughter, Lamia. Phemonoe foretold the “coming of the day when that which is hidden shall be revealed”.

Each of the 6 tiles are 12″ x 12″, with the full image 36″ x 24″.  1st half, 20th century

I have also added a link to view the full ceiling.
https://upload.wikimedia.org/…/07/CAPPELLA_SISTINA_Ceiling.…

36 x 24 inches

91.44 x 60.96 cm

$3500




More items related to: , , ,

6-Tile Mural, Libyan Sibyl from Sistine Chapel

Michelangelo di Lodovico Buonarroti Simoni (1475-1564), universally known simply as Michelangelo, was arguably the greatest artist of all time. His sculpture of David is probably the most famous sculpture in the world and his frescoes on the ceiling of the Sistine Chapel are possibly man’s greatest achievement in the history of painting.

Despite his distaste for painting (he was a sculptor and considered painting to be less serious), he reluctantly accepted the commission of this arduous project from Pope Julius II in 1508. Painted between 1508 and 1512, the Sistine Chapel ceiling features 343 figures within more than 5000 square feet of painted ceiling.

Contrary to popular belief, Michelangelo did not paint the ceiling while laying on his back. Holes were drilled into the walls above the windows in the room from which brackets were placed to support a large flat scaffold on which he stood to paint. Even so, the work was physically demanding and Michelangelo wrote this amusing sonnet describing the results.
I’ve grown a goitre by dwelling in this den–
As cats from stagnant streams in Lombardy,
Or in what other land they hap to be–
Which drives the belly close beneath the chin:

My beard turns up to heaven; my nape falls in,
Fixed on my spine: my breast-bone visibly
Grows like a harp: a rich embroidery
Bedews my face from brush-drops thick and thin.

My loins into my paunch like levers grind:
My buttock like a crupper bears my weight;
My feet unguided wander to and fro;
In front my skin grows loose and long; behind,

By bending it becomes more taut and strait;
Crosswise I strain me like a Syrian bow:
Whence false and quaint, I know,
Must be the fruit of squinting brain and eye;

For ill can aim the gun that bends awry.
Come then, Giovanni, try
To succour my dead pictures and my fame;
Since foul I fare and painting is my shame.

This six-tile mural from the first half of the 20th century, depicts
Michelangelo’s magnificent Libyan Sibyl, Phemonoe, the daughter of Zeus and Poseidon’s daughter, Lamia. Phemonoe foretold the “coming of the day when that which is hidden shall be revealed”.

Each of the 6 tiles are 12″ x 12″, with the full image 36″ x 24″.  1st half, 20th century

I have also added a link to view the full ceiling.
https://upload.wikimedia.org/…/07/CAPPELLA_SISTINA_Ceiling.…

36 x 24 inches

91.44 x 60.96 cm

$3500




More items related to: , , ,

6-Tile Mural, Libyan Sibyl from Sistine Chapel

Michelangelo di Lodovico Buonarroti Simoni (1475-1564), universally known simply as Michelangelo, was arguably the greatest artist of all time. His sculpture of David is probably the most famous sculpture in the world and his frescoes on the ceiling of the Sistine Chapel are possibly man’s greatest achievement in the history of painting.

Despite his distaste for painting (he was a sculptor and considered painting to be less serious), he reluctantly accepted the commission of this arduous project from Pope Julius II in 1508. Painted between 1508 and 1512, the Sistine Chapel ceiling features 343 figures within more than 5000 square feet of painted ceiling.

Contrary to popular belief, Michelangelo did not paint the ceiling while laying on his back. Holes were drilled into the walls above the windows in the room from which brackets were placed to support a large flat scaffold on which he stood to paint. Even so, the work was physically demanding and Michelangelo wrote this amusing sonnet describing the results.
I’ve grown a goitre by dwelling in this den–
As cats from stagnant streams in Lombardy,
Or in what other land they hap to be–
Which drives the belly close beneath the chin:

My beard turns up to heaven; my nape falls in,
Fixed on my spine: my breast-bone visibly
Grows like a harp: a rich embroidery
Bedews my face from brush-drops thick and thin.

My loins into my paunch like levers grind:
My buttock like a crupper bears my weight;
My feet unguided wander to and fro;
In front my skin grows loose and long; behind,

By bending it becomes more taut and strait;
Crosswise I strain me like a Syrian bow:
Whence false and quaint, I know,
Must be the fruit of squinting brain and eye;

For ill can aim the gun that bends awry.
Come then, Giovanni, try
To succour my dead pictures and my fame;
Since foul I fare and painting is my shame.

This six-tile mural from the first half of the 20th century, depicts
Michelangelo’s magnificent Libyan Sibyl, Phemonoe, the daughter of Zeus and Poseidon’s daughter, Lamia. Phemonoe foretold the “coming of the day when that which is hidden shall be revealed”.

Each of the 6 tiles are 12″ x 12″, with the full image 36″ x 24″.  1st half, 20th century

I have also added a link to view the full ceiling.
https://upload.wikimedia.org/…/07/CAPPELLA_SISTINA_Ceiling.…

36 x 24 inches

91.44 x 60.96 cm

$3500




More items related to: , , ,

6-Tile Mural, Libyan Sibyl from Sistine Chapel

Michelangelo di Lodovico Buonarroti Simoni (1475-1564), universally known simply as Michelangelo, was arguably the greatest artist of all time. His sculpture of David is probably the most famous sculpture in the world and his frescoes on the ceiling of the Sistine Chapel are possibly man’s greatest achievement in the history of painting.

Despite his distaste for painting (he was a sculptor and considered painting to be less serious), he reluctantly accepted the commission of this arduous project from Pope Julius II in 1508. Painted between 1508 and 1512, the Sistine Chapel ceiling features 343 figures within more than 5000 square feet of painted ceiling.

Contrary to popular belief, Michelangelo did not paint the ceiling while laying on his back. Holes were drilled into the walls above the windows in the room from which brackets were placed to support a large flat scaffold on which he stood to paint. Even so, the work was physically demanding and Michelangelo wrote this amusing sonnet describing the results.
I’ve grown a goitre by dwelling in this den–
As cats from stagnant streams in Lombardy,
Or in what other land they hap to be–
Which drives the belly close beneath the chin:

My beard turns up to heaven; my nape falls in,
Fixed on my spine: my breast-bone visibly
Grows like a harp: a rich embroidery
Bedews my face from brush-drops thick and thin.

My loins into my paunch like levers grind:
My buttock like a crupper bears my weight;
My feet unguided wander to and fro;
In front my skin grows loose and long; behind,

By bending it becomes more taut and strait;
Crosswise I strain me like a Syrian bow:
Whence false and quaint, I know,
Must be the fruit of squinting brain and eye;

For ill can aim the gun that bends awry.
Come then, Giovanni, try
To succour my dead pictures and my fame;
Since foul I fare and painting is my shame.

This six-tile mural from the first half of the 20th century, depicts
Michelangelo’s magnificent Libyan Sibyl, Phemonoe, the daughter of Zeus and Poseidon’s daughter, Lamia. Phemonoe foretold the “coming of the day when that which is hidden shall be revealed”.

Each of the 6 tiles are 12″ x 12″, with the full image 36″ x 24″.  1st half, 20th century

I have also added a link to view the full ceiling.
https://upload.wikimedia.org/…/07/CAPPELLA_SISTINA_Ceiling.…

36 x 24 inches

91.44 x 60.96 cm

$3500




More items related to: , , ,

6-Tile Mural, Libyan Sibyl from Sistine Chapel

Michelangelo di Lodovico Buonarroti Simoni (1475-1564), universally known simply as Michelangelo, was arguably the greatest artist of all time. His sculpture of David is probably the most famous sculpture in the world and his frescoes on the ceiling of the Sistine Chapel are possibly man’s greatest achievement in the history of painting.

Despite his distaste for painting (he was a sculptor and considered painting to be less serious), he reluctantly accepted the commission of this arduous project from Pope Julius II in 1508. Painted between 1508 and 1512, the Sistine Chapel ceiling features 343 figures within more than 5000 square feet of painted ceiling.

Contrary to popular belief, Michelangelo did not paint the ceiling while laying on his back. Holes were drilled into the walls above the windows in the room from which brackets were placed to support a large flat scaffold on which he stood to paint. Even so, the work was physically demanding and Michelangelo wrote this amusing sonnet describing the results.
I’ve grown a goitre by dwelling in this den–
As cats from stagnant streams in Lombardy,
Or in what other land they hap to be–
Which drives the belly close beneath the chin:

My beard turns up to heaven; my nape falls in,
Fixed on my spine: my breast-bone visibly
Grows like a harp: a rich embroidery
Bedews my face from brush-drops thick and thin.

My loins into my paunch like levers grind:
My buttock like a crupper bears my weight;
My feet unguided wander to and fro;
In front my skin grows loose and long; behind,

By bending it becomes more taut and strait;
Crosswise I strain me like a Syrian bow:
Whence false and quaint, I know,
Must be the fruit of squinting brain and eye;

For ill can aim the gun that bends awry.
Come then, Giovanni, try
To succour my dead pictures and my fame;
Since foul I fare and painting is my shame.

This six-tile mural from the first half of the 20th century, depicts
Michelangelo’s magnificent Libyan Sibyl, Phemonoe, the daughter of Zeus and Poseidon’s daughter, Lamia. Phemonoe foretold the “coming of the day when that which is hidden shall be revealed”.

Each of the 6 tiles are 12″ x 12″, with the full image 36″ x 24″.  1st half, 20th century

I have also added a link to view the full ceiling.
https://upload.wikimedia.org/…/07/CAPPELLA_SISTINA_Ceiling.…

36 x 24 inches

91.44 x 60.96 cm

$3500




More items related to: , , ,

6-Tile Mural, Libyan Sibyl from Sistine Chapel

Michelangelo di Lodovico Buonarroti Simoni (1475-1564), universally known simply as Michelangelo, was arguably the greatest artist of all time. His sculpture of David is probably the most famous sculpture in the world and his frescoes on the ceiling of the Sistine Chapel are possibly man’s greatest achievement in the history of painting.

Despite his distaste for painting (he was a sculptor and considered painting to be less serious), he reluctantly accepted the commission of this arduous project from Pope Julius II in 1508. Painted between 1508 and 1512, the Sistine Chapel ceiling features 343 figures within more than 5000 square feet of painted ceiling.

Contrary to popular belief, Michelangelo did not paint the ceiling while laying on his back. Holes were drilled into the walls above the windows in the room from which brackets were placed to support a large flat scaffold on which he stood to paint. Even so, the work was physically demanding and Michelangelo wrote this amusing sonnet describing the results.
I’ve grown a goitre by dwelling in this den–
As cats from stagnant streams in Lombardy,
Or in what other land they hap to be–
Which drives the belly close beneath the chin:

My beard turns up to heaven; my nape falls in,
Fixed on my spine: my breast-bone visibly
Grows like a harp: a rich embroidery
Bedews my face from brush-drops thick and thin.

My loins into my paunch like levers grind:
My buttock like a crupper bears my weight;
My feet unguided wander to and fro;
In front my skin grows loose and long; behind,

By bending it becomes more taut and strait;
Crosswise I strain me like a Syrian bow:
Whence false and quaint, I know,
Must be the fruit of squinting brain and eye;

For ill can aim the gun that bends awry.
Come then, Giovanni, try
To succour my dead pictures and my fame;
Since foul I fare and painting is my shame.

This six-tile mural from the first half of the 20th century, depicts
Michelangelo’s magnificent Libyan Sibyl, Phemonoe, the daughter of Zeus and Poseidon’s daughter, Lamia. Phemonoe foretold the “coming of the day when that which is hidden shall be revealed”.

Each of the 6 tiles are 12″ x 12″, with the full image 36″ x 24″.  1st half, 20th century

I have also added a link to view the full ceiling.
https://upload.wikimedia.org/…/07/CAPPELLA_SISTINA_Ceiling.…

36 x 24 inches

91.44 x 60.96 cm

$3500




More items related to: , , ,

6-Tile Mural, Libyan Sibyl from Sistine Chapel

Michelangelo di Lodovico Buonarroti Simoni (1475-1564), universally known simply as Michelangelo, was arguably the greatest artist of all time. His sculpture of David is probably the most famous sculpture in the world and his frescoes on the ceiling of the Sistine Chapel are possibly man’s greatest achievement in the history of painting.

Despite his distaste for painting (he was a sculptor and considered painting to be less serious), he reluctantly accepted the commission of this arduous project from Pope Julius II in 1508. Painted between 1508 and 1512, the Sistine Chapel ceiling features 343 figures within more than 5000 square feet of painted ceiling.

Contrary to popular belief, Michelangelo did not paint the ceiling while laying on his back. Holes were drilled into the walls above the windows in the room from which brackets were placed to support a large flat scaffold on which he stood to paint. Even so, the work was physically demanding and Michelangelo wrote this amusing sonnet describing the results.
I’ve grown a goitre by dwelling in this den–
As cats from stagnant streams in Lombardy,
Or in what other land they hap to be–
Which drives the belly close beneath the chin:

My beard turns up to heaven; my nape falls in,
Fixed on my spine: my breast-bone visibly
Grows like a harp: a rich embroidery
Bedews my face from brush-drops thick and thin.

My loins into my paunch like levers grind:
My buttock like a crupper bears my weight;
My feet unguided wander to and fro;
In front my skin grows loose and long; behind,

By bending it becomes more taut and strait;
Crosswise I strain me like a Syrian bow:
Whence false and quaint, I know,
Must be the fruit of squinting brain and eye;

For ill can aim the gun that bends awry.
Come then, Giovanni, try
To succour my dead pictures and my fame;
Since foul I fare and painting is my shame.

This six-tile mural from the first half of the 20th century, depicts
Michelangelo’s magnificent Libyan Sibyl, Phemonoe, the daughter of Zeus and Poseidon’s daughter, Lamia. Phemonoe foretold the “coming of the day when that which is hidden shall be revealed”.

Each of the 6 tiles are 12″ x 12″, with the full image 36″ x 24″.  1st half, 20th century

I have also added a link to view the full ceiling.
https://upload.wikimedia.org/…/07/CAPPELLA_SISTINA_Ceiling.…

36 x 24 inches

91.44 x 60.96 cm

$3500




More items related to: , , ,

6-Tile Mural, Libyan Sibyl from Sistine Chapel

Michelangelo di Lodovico Buonarroti Simoni (1475-1564), universally known simply as Michelangelo, was arguably the greatest artist of all time. His sculpture of David is probably the most famous sculpture in the world and his frescoes on the ceiling of the Sistine Chapel are possibly man’s greatest achievement in the history of painting.

Despite his distaste for painting (he was a sculptor and considered painting to be less serious), he reluctantly accepted the commission of this arduous project from Pope Julius II in 1508. Painted between 1508 and 1512, the Sistine Chapel ceiling features 343 figures within more than 5000 square feet of painted ceiling.

Contrary to popular belief, Michelangelo did not paint the ceiling while laying on his back. Holes were drilled into the walls above the windows in the room from which brackets were placed to support a large flat scaffold on which he stood to paint. Even so, the work was physically demanding and Michelangelo wrote this amusing sonnet describing the results.
I’ve grown a goitre by dwelling in this den–
As cats from stagnant streams in Lombardy,
Or in what other land they hap to be–
Which drives the belly close beneath the chin:

My beard turns up to heaven; my nape falls in,
Fixed on my spine: my breast-bone visibly
Grows like a harp: a rich embroidery
Bedews my face from brush-drops thick and thin.

My loins into my paunch like levers grind:
My buttock like a crupper bears my weight;
My feet unguided wander to and fro;
In front my skin grows loose and long; behind,

By bending it becomes more taut and strait;
Crosswise I strain me like a Syrian bow:
Whence false and quaint, I know,
Must be the fruit of squinting brain and eye;

For ill can aim the gun that bends awry.
Come then, Giovanni, try
To succour my dead pictures and my fame;
Since foul I fare and painting is my shame.

This six-tile mural from the first half of the 20th century, depicts
Michelangelo’s magnificent Libyan Sibyl, Phemonoe, the daughter of Zeus and Poseidon’s daughter, Lamia. Phemonoe foretold the “coming of the day when that which is hidden shall be revealed”.

Each of the 6 tiles are 12″ x 12″, with the full image 36″ x 24″.  1st half, 20th century

I have also added a link to view the full ceiling.
https://upload.wikimedia.org/…/07/CAPPELLA_SISTINA_Ceiling.…

36 x 24 inches

91.44 x 60.96 cm

$3500




More items related to: , , ,

6-Tile Mural, Libyan Sibyl from Sistine Chapel

Michelangelo di Lodovico Buonarroti Simoni (1475-1564), universally known simply as Michelangelo, was arguably the greatest artist of all time. His sculpture of David is probably the most famous sculpture in the world and his frescoes on the ceiling of the Sistine Chapel are possibly man’s greatest achievement in the history of painting.

Despite his distaste for painting (he was a sculptor and considered painting to be less serious), he reluctantly accepted the commission of this arduous project from Pope Julius II in 1508. Painted between 1508 and 1512, the Sistine Chapel ceiling features 343 figures within more than 5000 square feet of painted ceiling.

Contrary to popular belief, Michelangelo did not paint the ceiling while laying on his back. Holes were drilled into the walls above the windows in the room from which brackets were placed to support a large flat scaffold on which he stood to paint. Even so, the work was physically demanding and Michelangelo wrote this amusing sonnet describing the results.
I’ve grown a goitre by dwelling in this den–
As cats from stagnant streams in Lombardy,
Or in what other land they hap to be–
Which drives the belly close beneath the chin:

My beard turns up to heaven; my nape falls in,
Fixed on my spine: my breast-bone visibly
Grows like a harp: a rich embroidery
Bedews my face from brush-drops thick and thin.

My loins into my paunch like levers grind:
My buttock like a crupper bears my weight;
My feet unguided wander to and fro;
In front my skin grows loose and long; behind,

By bending it becomes more taut and strait;
Crosswise I strain me like a Syrian bow:
Whence false and quaint, I know,
Must be the fruit of squinting brain and eye;

For ill can aim the gun that bends awry.
Come then, Giovanni, try
To succour my dead pictures and my fame;
Since foul I fare and painting is my shame.

This six-tile mural from the first half of the 20th century, depicts
Michelangelo’s magnificent Libyan Sibyl, Phemonoe, the daughter of Zeus and Poseidon’s daughter, Lamia. Phemonoe foretold the “coming of the day when that which is hidden shall be revealed”.

Each of the 6 tiles are 12″ x 12″, with the full image 36″ x 24″.  1st half, 20th century

I have also added a link to view the full ceiling.
https://upload.wikimedia.org/…/07/CAPPELLA_SISTINA_Ceiling.…

36 x 24 inches

91.44 x 60.96 cm

$3500




More items related to: , , ,

6-Tile Mural, Libyan Sibyl from Sistine Chapel

Michelangelo di Lodovico Buonarroti Simoni (1475-1564), universally known simply as Michelangelo, was arguably the greatest artist of all time. His sculpture of David is probably the most famous sculpture in the world and his frescoes on the ceiling of the Sistine Chapel are possibly man’s greatest achievement in the history of painting.

Despite his distaste for painting (he was a sculptor and considered painting to be less serious), he reluctantly accepted the commission of this arduous project from Pope Julius II in 1508. Painted between 1508 and 1512, the Sistine Chapel ceiling features 343 figures within more than 5000 square feet of painted ceiling.

Contrary to popular belief, Michelangelo did not paint the ceiling while laying on his back. Holes were drilled into the walls above the windows in the room from which brackets were placed to support a large flat scaffold on which he stood to paint. Even so, the work was physically demanding and Michelangelo wrote this amusing sonnet describing the results.
I’ve grown a goitre by dwelling in this den–
As cats from stagnant streams in Lombardy,
Or in what other land they hap to be–
Which drives the belly close beneath the chin:

My beard turns up to heaven; my nape falls in,
Fixed on my spine: my breast-bone visibly
Grows like a harp: a rich embroidery
Bedews my face from brush-drops thick and thin.

My loins into my paunch like levers grind:
My buttock like a crupper bears my weight;
My feet unguided wander to and fro;
In front my skin grows loose and long; behind,

By bending it becomes more taut and strait;
Crosswise I strain me like a Syrian bow:
Whence false and quaint, I know,
Must be the fruit of squinting brain and eye;

For ill can aim the gun that bends awry.
Come then, Giovanni, try
To succour my dead pictures and my fame;
Since foul I fare and painting is my shame.

This six-tile mural from the first half of the 20th century, depicts
Michelangelo’s magnificent Libyan Sibyl, Phemonoe, the daughter of Zeus and Poseidon’s daughter, Lamia. Phemonoe foretold the “coming of the day when that which is hidden shall be revealed”.

Each of the 6 tiles are 12″ x 12″, with the full image 36″ x 24″.  1st half, 20th century

I have also added a link to view the full ceiling.
https://upload.wikimedia.org/…/07/CAPPELLA_SISTINA_Ceiling.…

36 x 24 inches

91.44 x 60.96 cm

$3500




More items related to: , , ,

6-Tile Mural, Libyan Sibyl from Sistine Chapel

Michelangelo di Lodovico Buonarroti Simoni (1475-1564), universally known simply as Michelangelo, was arguably the greatest artist of all time. His sculpture of David is probably the most famous sculpture in the world and his frescoes on the ceiling of the Sistine Chapel are possibly man’s greatest achievement in the history of painting.

Despite his distaste for painting (he was a sculptor and considered painting to be less serious), he reluctantly accepted the commission of this arduous project from Pope Julius II in 1508. Painted between 1508 and 1512, the Sistine Chapel ceiling features 343 figures within more than 5000 square feet of painted ceiling.

Contrary to popular belief, Michelangelo did not paint the ceiling while laying on his back. Holes were drilled into the walls above the windows in the room from which brackets were placed to support a large flat scaffold on which he stood to paint. Even so, the work was physically demanding and Michelangelo wrote this amusing sonnet describing the results.
I’ve grown a goitre by dwelling in this den–
As cats from stagnant streams in Lombardy,
Or in what other land they hap to be–
Which drives the belly close beneath the chin:

My beard turns up to heaven; my nape falls in,
Fixed on my spine: my breast-bone visibly
Grows like a harp: a rich embroidery
Bedews my face from brush-drops thick and thin.

My loins into my paunch like levers grind:
My buttock like a crupper bears my weight;
My feet unguided wander to and fro;
In front my skin grows loose and long; behind,

By bending it becomes more taut and strait;
Crosswise I strain me like a Syrian bow:
Whence false and quaint, I know,
Must be the fruit of squinting brain and eye;

For ill can aim the gun that bends awry.
Come then, Giovanni, try
To succour my dead pictures and my fame;
Since foul I fare and painting is my shame.

This six-tile mural from the first half of the 20th century, depicts
Michelangelo’s magnificent Libyan Sibyl, Phemonoe, the daughter of Zeus and Poseidon’s daughter, Lamia. Phemonoe foretold the “coming of the day when that which is hidden shall be revealed”.

Each of the 6 tiles are 12″ x 12″, with the full image 36″ x 24″.  1st half, 20th century

I have also added a link to view the full ceiling.
https://upload.wikimedia.org/…/07/CAPPELLA_SISTINA_Ceiling.…

36 x 24 inches

91.44 x 60.96 cm

$3500




More items related to: , , ,

6-Tile Mural, Libyan Sibyl from Sistine Chapel

Michelangelo di Lodovico Buonarroti Simoni (1475-1564), universally known simply as Michelangelo, was arguably the greatest artist of all time. His sculpture of David is probably the most famous sculpture in the world and his frescoes on the ceiling of the Sistine Chapel are possibly man’s greatest achievement in the history of painting.

Despite his distaste for painting (he was a sculptor and considered painting to be less serious), he reluctantly accepted the commission of this arduous project from Pope Julius II in 1508. Painted between 1508 and 1512, the Sistine Chapel ceiling features 343 figures within more than 5000 square feet of painted ceiling.

Contrary to popular belief, Michelangelo did not paint the ceiling while laying on his back. Holes were drilled into the walls above the windows in the room from which brackets were placed to support a large flat scaffold on which he stood to paint. Even so, the work was physically demanding and Michelangelo wrote this amusing sonnet describing the results.
I’ve grown a goitre by dwelling in this den–
As cats from stagnant streams in Lombardy,
Or in what other land they hap to be–
Which drives the belly close beneath the chin:

My beard turns up to heaven; my nape falls in,
Fixed on my spine: my breast-bone visibly
Grows like a harp: a rich embroidery
Bedews my face from brush-drops thick and thin.

My loins into my paunch like levers grind:
My buttock like a crupper bears my weight;
My feet unguided wander to and fro;
In front my skin grows loose and long; behind,

By bending it becomes more taut and strait;
Crosswise I strain me like a Syrian bow:
Whence false and quaint, I know,
Must be the fruit of squinting brain and eye;

For ill can aim the gun that bends awry.
Come then, Giovanni, try
To succour my dead pictures and my fame;
Since foul I fare and painting is my shame.

This six-tile mural from the first half of the 20th century, depicts
Michelangelo’s magnificent Libyan Sibyl, Phemonoe, the daughter of Zeus and Poseidon’s daughter, Lamia. Phemonoe foretold the “coming of the day when that which is hidden shall be revealed”.

Each of the 6 tiles are 12″ x 12″, with the full image 36″ x 24″.  1st half, 20th century

I have also added a link to view the full ceiling.
https://upload.wikimedia.org/…/07/CAPPELLA_SISTINA_Ceiling.…

36 x 24 inches

91.44 x 60.96 cm

$3500




More items related to: , , ,

6-Tile Mural, Libyan Sibyl from Sistine Chapel

Michelangelo di Lodovico Buonarroti Simoni (1475-1564), universally known simply as Michelangelo, was arguably the greatest artist of all time. His sculpture of David is probably the most famous sculpture in the world and his frescoes on the ceiling of the Sistine Chapel are possibly man’s greatest achievement in the history of painting.

Despite his distaste for painting (he was a sculptor and considered painting to be less serious), he reluctantly accepted the commission of this arduous project from Pope Julius II in 1508. Painted between 1508 and 1512, the Sistine Chapel ceiling features 343 figures within more than 5000 square feet of painted ceiling.

Contrary to popular belief, Michelangelo did not paint the ceiling while laying on his back. Holes were drilled into the walls above the windows in the room from which brackets were placed to support a large flat scaffold on which he stood to paint. Even so, the work was physically demanding and Michelangelo wrote this amusing sonnet describing the results.
I’ve grown a goitre by dwelling in this den–
As cats from stagnant streams in Lombardy,
Or in what other land they hap to be–
Which drives the belly close beneath the chin:

My beard turns up to heaven; my nape falls in,
Fixed on my spine: my breast-bone visibly
Grows like a harp: a rich embroidery
Bedews my face from brush-drops thick and thin.

My loins into my paunch like levers grind:
My buttock like a crupper bears my weight;
My feet unguided wander to and fro;
In front my skin grows loose and long; behind,

By bending it becomes more taut and strait;
Crosswise I strain me like a Syrian bow:
Whence false and quaint, I know,
Must be the fruit of squinting brain and eye;

For ill can aim the gun that bends awry.
Come then, Giovanni, try
To succour my dead pictures and my fame;
Since foul I fare and painting is my shame.

This six-tile mural from the first half of the 20th century, depicts
Michelangelo’s magnificent Libyan Sibyl, Phemonoe, the daughter of Zeus and Poseidon’s daughter, Lamia. Phemonoe foretold the “coming of the day when that which is hidden shall be revealed”.

Each of the 6 tiles are 12″ x 12″, with the full image 36″ x 24″.  1st half, 20th century

I have also added a link to view the full ceiling.
https://upload.wikimedia.org/…/07/CAPPELLA_SISTINA_Ceiling.…

36 x 24 inches

91.44 x 60.96 cm

$3500




More items related to: , , ,

6-Tile Mural, Libyan Sibyl from Sistine Chapel

Michelangelo di Lodovico Buonarroti Simoni (1475-1564), universally known simply as Michelangelo, was arguably the greatest artist of all time. His sculpture of David is probably the most famous sculpture in the world and his frescoes on the ceiling of the Sistine Chapel are possibly man’s greatest achievement in the history of painting.

Despite his distaste for painting (he was a sculptor and considered painting to be less serious), he reluctantly accepted the commission of this arduous project from Pope Julius II in 1508. Painted between 1508 and 1512, the Sistine Chapel ceiling features 343 figures within more than 5000 square feet of painted ceiling.

Contrary to popular belief, Michelangelo did not paint the ceiling while laying on his back. Holes were drilled into the walls above the windows in the room from which brackets were placed to support a large flat scaffold on which he stood to paint. Even so, the work was physically demanding and Michelangelo wrote this amusing sonnet describing the results.
I’ve grown a goitre by dwelling in this den–
As cats from stagnant streams in Lombardy,
Or in what other land they hap to be–
Which drives the belly close beneath the chin:

My beard turns up to heaven; my nape falls in,
Fixed on my spine: my breast-bone visibly
Grows like a harp: a rich embroidery
Bedews my face from brush-drops thick and thin.

My loins into my paunch like levers grind:
My buttock like a crupper bears my weight;
My feet unguided wander to and fro;
In front my skin grows loose and long; behind,

By bending it becomes more taut and strait;
Crosswise I strain me like a Syrian bow:
Whence false and quaint, I know,
Must be the fruit of squinting brain and eye;

For ill can aim the gun that bends awry.
Come then, Giovanni, try
To succour my dead pictures and my fame;
Since foul I fare and painting is my shame.

This six-tile mural from the first half of the 20th century, depicts
Michelangelo’s magnificent Libyan Sibyl, Phemonoe, the daughter of Zeus and Poseidon’s daughter, Lamia. Phemonoe foretold the “coming of the day when that which is hidden shall be revealed”.

Each of the 6 tiles are 12″ x 12″, with the full image 36″ x 24″.  1st half, 20th century

I have also added a link to view the full ceiling.
https://upload.wikimedia.org/…/07/CAPPELLA_SISTINA_Ceiling.…

36 x 24 inches

91.44 x 60.96 cm

$3500




More items related to: , , ,

6-Tile Mural, Libyan Sibyl from Sistine Chapel

Michelangelo di Lodovico Buonarroti Simoni (1475-1564), universally known simply as Michelangelo, was arguably the greatest artist of all time. His sculpture of David is probably the most famous sculpture in the world and his frescoes on the ceiling of the Sistine Chapel are possibly man’s greatest achievement in the history of painting.

Despite his distaste for painting (he was a sculptor and considered painting to be less serious), he reluctantly accepted the commission of this arduous project from Pope Julius II in 1508. Painted between 1508 and 1512, the Sistine Chapel ceiling features 343 figures within more than 5000 square feet of painted ceiling.

Contrary to popular belief, Michelangelo did not paint the ceiling while laying on his back. Holes were drilled into the walls above the windows in the room from which brackets were placed to support a large flat scaffold on which he stood to paint. Even so, the work was physically demanding and Michelangelo wrote this amusing sonnet describing the results.
I’ve grown a goitre by dwelling in this den–
As cats from stagnant streams in Lombardy,
Or in what other land they hap to be–
Which drives the belly close beneath the chin:

My beard turns up to heaven; my nape falls in,
Fixed on my spine: my breast-bone visibly
Grows like a harp: a rich embroidery
Bedews my face from brush-drops thick and thin.

My loins into my paunch like levers grind:
My buttock like a crupper bears my weight;
My feet unguided wander to and fro;
In front my skin grows loose and long; behind,

By bending it becomes more taut and strait;
Crosswise I strain me like a Syrian bow:
Whence false and quaint, I know,
Must be the fruit of squinting brain and eye;

For ill can aim the gun that bends awry.
Come then, Giovanni, try
To succour my dead pictures and my fame;
Since foul I fare and painting is my shame.

This six-tile mural from the first half of the 20th century, depicts
Michelangelo’s magnificent Libyan Sibyl, Phemonoe, the daughter of Zeus and Poseidon’s daughter, Lamia. Phemonoe foretold the “coming of the day when that which is hidden shall be revealed”.

Each of the 6 tiles are 12″ x 12″, with the full image 36″ x 24″.  1st half, 20th century

I have also added a link to view the full ceiling.
https://upload.wikimedia.org/…/07/CAPPELLA_SISTINA_Ceiling.…

36 x 24 inches

91.44 x 60.96 cm

$3500




More items related to: , , ,

6-Tile Mural, Libyan Sibyl from Sistine Chapel

Michelangelo di Lodovico Buonarroti Simoni (1475-1564), universally known simply as Michelangelo, was arguably the greatest artist of all time. His sculpture of David is probably the most famous sculpture in the world and his frescoes on the ceiling of the Sistine Chapel are possibly man’s greatest achievement in the history of painting.

Despite his distaste for painting (he was a sculptor and considered painting to be less serious), he reluctantly accepted the commission of this arduous project from Pope Julius II in 1508. Painted between 1508 and 1512, the Sistine Chapel ceiling features 343 figures within more than 5000 square feet of painted ceiling.

Contrary to popular belief, Michelangelo did not paint the ceiling while laying on his back. Holes were drilled into the walls above the windows in the room from which brackets were placed to support a large flat scaffold on which he stood to paint. Even so, the work was physically demanding and Michelangelo wrote this amusing sonnet describing the results.
I’ve grown a goitre by dwelling in this den–
As cats from stagnant streams in Lombardy,
Or in what other land they hap to be–
Which drives the belly close beneath the chin:

My beard turns up to heaven; my nape falls in,
Fixed on my spine: my breast-bone visibly
Grows like a harp: a rich embroidery
Bedews my face from brush-drops thick and thin.

My loins into my paunch like levers grind:
My buttock like a crupper bears my weight;
My feet unguided wander to and fro;
In front my skin grows loose and long; behind,

By bending it becomes more taut and strait;
Crosswise I strain me like a Syrian bow:
Whence false and quaint, I know,
Must be the fruit of squinting brain and eye;

For ill can aim the gun that bends awry.
Come then, Giovanni, try
To succour my dead pictures and my fame;
Since foul I fare and painting is my shame.

This six-tile mural from the first half of the 20th century, depicts
Michelangelo’s magnificent Libyan Sibyl, Phemonoe, the daughter of Zeus and Poseidon’s daughter, Lamia. Phemonoe foretold the “coming of the day when that which is hidden shall be revealed”.

Each of the 6 tiles are 12″ x 12″, with the full image 36″ x 24″.  1st half, 20th century

I have also added a link to view the full ceiling.
https://upload.wikimedia.org/…/07/CAPPELLA_SISTINA_Ceiling.…

36 x 24 inches

91.44 x 60.96 cm

$3500




More items related to: , , ,

6-Tile Mural, Libyan Sibyl from Sistine Chapel

Michelangelo di Lodovico Buonarroti Simoni (1475-1564), universally known simply as Michelangelo, was arguably the greatest artist of all time. His sculpture of David is probably the most famous sculpture in the world and his frescoes on the ceiling of the Sistine Chapel are possibly man’s greatest achievement in the history of painting.

Despite his distaste for painting (he was a sculptor and considered painting to be less serious), he reluctantly accepted the commission of this arduous project from Pope Julius II in 1508. Painted between 1508 and 1512, the Sistine Chapel ceiling features 343 figures within more than 5000 square feet of painted ceiling.

Contrary to popular belief, Michelangelo did not paint the ceiling while laying on his back. Holes were drilled into the walls above the windows in the room from which brackets were placed to support a large flat scaffold on which he stood to paint. Even so, the work was physically demanding and Michelangelo wrote this amusing sonnet describing the results.
I’ve grown a goitre by dwelling in this den–
As cats from stagnant streams in Lombardy,
Or in what other land they hap to be–
Which drives the belly close beneath the chin:

My beard turns up to heaven; my nape falls in,
Fixed on my spine: my breast-bone visibly
Grows like a harp: a rich embroidery
Bedews my face from brush-drops thick and thin.

My loins into my paunch like levers grind:
My buttock like a crupper bears my weight;
My feet unguided wander to and fro;
In front my skin grows loose and long; behind,

By bending it becomes more taut and strait;
Crosswise I strain me like a Syrian bow:
Whence false and quaint, I know,
Must be the fruit of squinting brain and eye;

For ill can aim the gun that bends awry.
Come then, Giovanni, try
To succour my dead pictures and my fame;
Since foul I fare and painting is my shame.

This six-tile mural from the first half of the 20th century, depicts
Michelangelo’s magnificent Libyan Sibyl, Phemonoe, the daughter of Zeus and Poseidon’s daughter, Lamia. Phemonoe foretold the “coming of the day when that which is hidden shall be revealed”.

Each of the 6 tiles are 12″ x 12″, with the full image 36″ x 24″.  1st half, 20th century

I have also added a link to view the full ceiling.
https://upload.wikimedia.org/…/07/CAPPELLA_SISTINA_Ceiling.…

36 x 24 inches

91.44 x 60.96 cm

$3500




More items related to: , , ,

6-Tile Mural, Libyan Sibyl from Sistine Chapel

Michelangelo di Lodovico Buonarroti Simoni (1475-1564), universally known simply as Michelangelo, was arguably the greatest artist of all time. His sculpture of David is probably the most famous sculpture in the world and his frescoes on the ceiling of the Sistine Chapel are possibly man’s greatest achievement in the history of painting.

Despite his distaste for painting (he was a sculptor and considered painting to be less serious), he reluctantly accepted the commission of this arduous project from Pope Julius II in 1508. Painted between 1508 and 1512, the Sistine Chapel ceiling features 343 figures within more than 5000 square feet of painted ceiling.

Contrary to popular belief, Michelangelo did not paint the ceiling while laying on his back. Holes were drilled into the walls above the windows in the room from which brackets were placed to support a large flat scaffold on which he stood to paint. Even so, the work was physically demanding and Michelangelo wrote this amusing sonnet describing the results.
I’ve grown a goitre by dwelling in this den–
As cats from stagnant streams in Lombardy,
Or in what other land they hap to be–
Which drives the belly close beneath the chin:

My beard turns up to heaven; my nape falls in,
Fixed on my spine: my breast-bone visibly
Grows like a harp: a rich embroidery
Bedews my face from brush-drops thick and thin.

My loins into my paunch like levers grind:
My buttock like a crupper bears my weight;
My feet unguided wander to and fro;
In front my skin grows loose and long; behind,

By bending it becomes more taut and strait;
Crosswise I strain me like a Syrian bow:
Whence false and quaint, I know,
Must be the fruit of squinting brain and eye;

For ill can aim the gun that bends awry.
Come then, Giovanni, try
To succour my dead pictures and my fame;
Since foul I fare and painting is my shame.

This six-tile mural from the first half of the 20th century, depicts
Michelangelo’s magnificent Libyan Sibyl, Phemonoe, the daughter of Zeus and Poseidon’s daughter, Lamia. Phemonoe foretold the “coming of the day when that which is hidden shall be revealed”.

Each of the 6 tiles are 12″ x 12″, with the full image 36″ x 24″.  1st half, 20th century

I have also added a link to view the full ceiling.
https://upload.wikimedia.org/…/07/CAPPELLA_SISTINA_Ceiling.…

36 x 24 inches

91.44 x 60.96 cm

$3500




More items related to: , , ,

6-Tile Mural, Libyan Sibyl from Sistine Chapel

Michelangelo di Lodovico Buonarroti Simoni (1475-1564), universally known simply as Michelangelo, was arguably the greatest artist of all time. His sculpture of David is probably the most famous sculpture in the world and his frescoes on the ceiling of the Sistine Chapel are possibly man’s greatest achievement in the history of painting.

Despite his distaste for painting (he was a sculptor and considered painting to be less serious), he reluctantly accepted the commission of this arduous project from Pope Julius II in 1508. Painted between 1508 and 1512, the Sistine Chapel ceiling features 343 figures within more than 5000 square feet of painted ceiling.

Contrary to popular belief, Michelangelo did not paint the ceiling while laying on his back. Holes were drilled into the walls above the windows in the room from which brackets were placed to support a large flat scaffold on which he stood to paint. Even so, the work was physically demanding and Michelangelo wrote this amusing sonnet describing the results.
I’ve grown a goitre by dwelling in this den–
As cats from stagnant streams in Lombardy,
Or in what other land they hap to be–
Which drives the belly close beneath the chin:

My beard turns up to heaven; my nape falls in,
Fixed on my spine: my breast-bone visibly
Grows like a harp: a rich embroidery
Bedews my face from brush-drops thick and thin.

My loins into my paunch like levers grind:
My buttock like a crupper bears my weight;
My feet unguided wander to and fro;
In front my skin grows loose and long; behind,

By bending it becomes more taut and strait;
Crosswise I strain me like a Syrian bow:
Whence false and quaint, I know,
Must be the fruit of squinting brain and eye;

For ill can aim the gun that bends awry.
Come then, Giovanni, try
To succour my dead pictures and my fame;
Since foul I fare and painting is my shame.

This six-tile mural from the first half of the 20th century, depicts
Michelangelo’s magnificent Libyan Sibyl, Phemonoe, the daughter of Zeus and Poseidon’s daughter, Lamia. Phemonoe foretold the “coming of the day when that which is hidden shall be revealed”.

Each of the 6 tiles are 12″ x 12″, with the full image 36″ x 24″.  1st half, 20th century

I have also added a link to view the full ceiling.
https://upload.wikimedia.org/…/07/CAPPELLA_SISTINA_Ceiling.…

36 x 24 inches

91.44 x 60.96 cm

$3500




More items related to: , , ,

6-Tile Mural, Libyan Sibyl from Sistine Chapel

Michelangelo di Lodovico Buonarroti Simoni (1475-1564), universally known simply as Michelangelo, was arguably the greatest artist of all time. His sculpture of David is probably the most famous sculpture in the world and his frescoes on the ceiling of the Sistine Chapel are possibly man’s greatest achievement in the history of painting.

Despite his distaste for painting (he was a sculptor and considered painting to be less serious), he reluctantly accepted the commission of this arduous project from Pope Julius II in 1508. Painted between 1508 and 1512, the Sistine Chapel ceiling features 343 figures within more than 5000 square feet of painted ceiling.

Contrary to popular belief, Michelangelo did not paint the ceiling while laying on his back. Holes were drilled into the walls above the windows in the room from which brackets were placed to support a large flat scaffold on which he stood to paint. Even so, the work was physically demanding and Michelangelo wrote this amusing sonnet describing the results.
I’ve grown a goitre by dwelling in this den–
As cats from stagnant streams in Lombardy,
Or in what other land they hap to be–
Which drives the belly close beneath the chin:

My beard turns up to heaven; my nape falls in,
Fixed on my spine: my breast-bone visibly
Grows like a harp: a rich embroidery
Bedews my face from brush-drops thick and thin.

My loins into my paunch like levers grind:
My buttock like a crupper bears my weight;
My feet unguided wander to and fro;
In front my skin grows loose and long; behind,

By bending it becomes more taut and strait;
Crosswise I strain me like a Syrian bow:
Whence false and quaint, I know,
Must be the fruit of squinting brain and eye;

For ill can aim the gun that bends awry.
Come then, Giovanni, try
To succour my dead pictures and my fame;
Since foul I fare and painting is my shame.

This six-tile mural from the first half of the 20th century, depicts
Michelangelo’s magnificent Libyan Sibyl, Phemonoe, the daughter of Zeus and Poseidon’s daughter, Lamia. Phemonoe foretold the “coming of the day when that which is hidden shall be revealed”.

Each of the 6 tiles are 12″ x 12″, with the full image 36″ x 24″.  1st half, 20th century

I have also added a link to view the full ceiling.
https://upload.wikimedia.org/…/07/CAPPELLA_SISTINA_Ceiling.…

36 x 24 inches

91.44 x 60.96 cm

$3500




More items related to: , , ,

6-Tile Mural, Libyan Sibyl from Sistine Chapel

Michelangelo di Lodovico Buonarroti Simoni (1475-1564), universally known simply as Michelangelo, was arguably the greatest artist of all time. His sculpture of David is probably the most famous sculpture in the world and his frescoes on the ceiling of the Sistine Chapel are possibly man’s greatest achievement in the history of painting.

Despite his distaste for painting (he was a sculptor and considered painting to be less serious), he reluctantly accepted the commission of this arduous project from Pope Julius II in 1508. Painted between 1508 and 1512, the Sistine Chapel ceiling features 343 figures within more than 5000 square feet of painted ceiling.

Contrary to popular belief, Michelangelo did not paint the ceiling while laying on his back. Holes were drilled into the walls above the windows in the room from which brackets were placed to support a large flat scaffold on which he stood to paint. Even so, the work was physically demanding and Michelangelo wrote this amusing sonnet describing the results.
I’ve grown a goitre by dwelling in this den–
As cats from stagnant streams in Lombardy,
Or in what other land they hap to be–
Which drives the belly close beneath the chin:

My beard turns up to heaven; my nape falls in,
Fixed on my spine: my breast-bone visibly
Grows like a harp: a rich embroidery
Bedews my face from brush-drops thick and thin.

My loins into my paunch like levers grind:
My buttock like a crupper bears my weight;
My feet unguided wander to and fro;
In front my skin grows loose and long; behind,

By bending it becomes more taut and strait;
Crosswise I strain me like a Syrian bow:
Whence false and quaint, I know,
Must be the fruit of squinting brain and eye;

For ill can aim the gun that bends awry.
Come then, Giovanni, try
To succour my dead pictures and my fame;
Since foul I fare and painting is my shame.

This six-tile mural from the first half of the 20th century, depicts
Michelangelo’s magnificent Libyan Sibyl, Phemonoe, the daughter of Zeus and Poseidon’s daughter, Lamia. Phemonoe foretold the “coming of the day when that which is hidden shall be revealed”.

Each of the 6 tiles are 12″ x 12″, with the full image 36″ x 24″.  1st half, 20th century

I have also added a link to view the full ceiling.
https://upload.wikimedia.org/…/07/CAPPELLA_SISTINA_Ceiling.…

36 x 24 inches

91.44 x 60.96 cm

$3500




More items related to: , , ,

6-Tile Mural, Libyan Sibyl from Sistine Chapel

Michelangelo di Lodovico Buonarroti Simoni (1475-1564), universally known simply as Michelangelo, was arguably the greatest artist of all time. His sculpture of David is probably the most famous sculpture in the world and his frescoes on the ceiling of the Sistine Chapel are possibly man’s greatest achievement in the history of painting.

Despite his distaste for painting (he was a sculptor and considered painting to be less serious), he reluctantly accepted the commission of this arduous project from Pope Julius II in 1508. Painted between 1508 and 1512, the Sistine Chapel ceiling features 343 figures within more than 5000 square feet of painted ceiling.

Contrary to popular belief, Michelangelo did not paint the ceiling while laying on his back. Holes were drilled into the walls above the windows in the room from which brackets were placed to support a large flat scaffold on which he stood to paint. Even so, the work was physically demanding and Michelangelo wrote this amusing sonnet describing the results.
I’ve grown a goitre by dwelling in this den–
As cats from stagnant streams in Lombardy,
Or in what other land they hap to be–
Which drives the belly close beneath the chin:

My beard turns up to heaven; my nape falls in,
Fixed on my spine: my breast-bone visibly
Grows like a harp: a rich embroidery
Bedews my face from brush-drops thick and thin.

My loins into my paunch like levers grind:
My buttock like a crupper bears my weight;
My feet unguided wander to and fro;
In front my skin grows loose and long; behind,

By bending it becomes more taut and strait;
Crosswise I strain me like a Syrian bow:
Whence false and quaint, I know,
Must be the fruit of squinting brain and eye;

For ill can aim the gun that bends awry.
Come then, Giovanni, try
To succour my dead pictures and my fame;
Since foul I fare and painting is my shame.

This six-tile mural from the first half of the 20th century, depicts
Michelangelo’s magnificent Libyan Sibyl, Phemonoe, the daughter of Zeus and Poseidon’s daughter, Lamia. Phemonoe foretold the “coming of the day when that which is hidden shall be revealed”.

Each of the 6 tiles are 12″ x 12″, with the full image 36″ x 24″.  1st half, 20th century

I have also added a link to view the full ceiling.
https://upload.wikimedia.org/…/07/CAPPELLA_SISTINA_Ceiling.…

36 x 24 inches

91.44 x 60.96 cm

$3500




More items related to: , , ,

6-Tile Mural, Libyan Sibyl from Sistine Chapel

Michelangelo di Lodovico Buonarroti Simoni (1475-1564), universally known simply as Michelangelo, was arguably the greatest artist of all time. His sculpture of David is probably the most famous sculpture in the world and his frescoes on the ceiling of the Sistine Chapel are possibly man’s greatest achievement in the history of painting.

Despite his distaste for painting (he was a sculptor and considered painting to be less serious), he reluctantly accepted the commission of this arduous project from Pope Julius II in 1508. Painted between 1508 and 1512, the Sistine Chapel ceiling features 343 figures within more than 5000 square feet of painted ceiling.

Contrary to popular belief, Michelangelo did not paint the ceiling while laying on his back. Holes were drilled into the walls above the windows in the room from which brackets were placed to support a large flat scaffold on which he stood to paint. Even so, the work was physically demanding and Michelangelo wrote this amusing sonnet describing the results.
I’ve grown a goitre by dwelling in this den–
As cats from stagnant streams in Lombardy,
Or in what other land they hap to be–
Which drives the belly close beneath the chin:

My beard turns up to heaven; my nape falls in,
Fixed on my spine: my breast-bone visibly
Grows like a harp: a rich embroidery
Bedews my face from brush-drops thick and thin.

My loins into my paunch like levers grind:
My buttock like a crupper bears my weight;
My feet unguided wander to and fro;
In front my skin grows loose and long; behind,

By bending it becomes more taut and strait;
Crosswise I strain me like a Syrian bow:
Whence false and quaint, I know,
Must be the fruit of squinting brain and eye;

For ill can aim the gun that bends awry.
Come then, Giovanni, try
To succour my dead pictures and my fame;
Since foul I fare and painting is my shame.

This six-tile mural from the first half of the 20th century, depicts
Michelangelo’s magnificent Libyan Sibyl, Phemonoe, the daughter of Zeus and Poseidon’s daughter, Lamia. Phemonoe foretold the “coming of the day when that which is hidden shall be revealed”.

Each of the 6 tiles are 12″ x 12″, with the full image 36″ x 24″.  1st half, 20th century

I have also added a link to view the full ceiling.
https://upload.wikimedia.org/…/07/CAPPELLA_SISTINA_Ceiling.…

36 x 24 inches

91.44 x 60.96 cm

$3500




More items related to: , , ,

6-Tile Mural, Libyan Sibyl from Sistine Chapel

Michelangelo di Lodovico Buonarroti Simoni (1475-1564), universally known simply as Michelangelo, was arguably the greatest artist of all time. His sculpture of David is probably the most famous sculpture in the world and his frescoes on the ceiling of the Sistine Chapel are possibly man’s greatest achievement in the history of painting.

Despite his distaste for painting (he was a sculptor and considered painting to be less serious), he reluctantly accepted the commission of this arduous project from Pope Julius II in 1508. Painted between 1508 and 1512, the Sistine Chapel ceiling features 343 figures within more than 5000 square feet of painted ceiling.

Contrary to popular belief, Michelangelo did not paint the ceiling while laying on his back. Holes were drilled into the walls above the windows in the room from which brackets were placed to support a large flat scaffold on which he stood to paint. Even so, the work was physically demanding and Michelangelo wrote this amusing sonnet describing the results.
I’ve grown a goitre by dwelling in this den–
As cats from stagnant streams in Lombardy,
Or in what other land they hap to be–
Which drives the belly close beneath the chin:

My beard turns up to heaven; my nape falls in,
Fixed on my spine: my breast-bone visibly
Grows like a harp: a rich embroidery
Bedews my face from brush-drops thick and thin.

My loins into my paunch like levers grind:
My buttock like a crupper bears my weight;
My feet unguided wander to and fro;
In front my skin grows loose and long; behind,

By bending it becomes more taut and strait;
Crosswise I strain me like a Syrian bow:
Whence false and quaint, I know,
Must be the fruit of squinting brain and eye;

For ill can aim the gun that bends awry.
Come then, Giovanni, try
To succour my dead pictures and my fame;
Since foul I fare and painting is my shame.

This six-tile mural from the first half of the 20th century, depicts
Michelangelo’s magnificent Libyan Sibyl, Phemonoe, the daughter of Zeus and Poseidon’s daughter, Lamia. Phemonoe foretold the “coming of the day when that which is hidden shall be revealed”.

Each of the 6 tiles are 12″ x 12″, with the full image 36″ x 24″.  1st half, 20th century

I have also added a link to view the full ceiling.
https://upload.wikimedia.org/…/07/CAPPELLA_SISTINA_Ceiling.…

36 x 24 inches

91.44 x 60.96 cm

$3500




More items related to: , , ,

6-Tile Mural, Libyan Sibyl from Sistine Chapel

Michelangelo di Lodovico Buonarroti Simoni (1475-1564), universally known simply as Michelangelo, was arguably the greatest artist of all time. His sculpture of David is probably the most famous sculpture in the world and his frescoes on the ceiling of the Sistine Chapel are possibly man’s greatest achievement in the history of painting.

Despite his distaste for painting (he was a sculptor and considered painting to be less serious), he reluctantly accepted the commission of this arduous project from Pope Julius II in 1508. Painted between 1508 and 1512, the Sistine Chapel ceiling features 343 figures within more than 5000 square feet of painted ceiling.

Contrary to popular belief, Michelangelo did not paint the ceiling while laying on his back. Holes were drilled into the walls above the windows in the room from which brackets were placed to support a large flat scaffold on which he stood to paint. Even so, the work was physically demanding and Michelangelo wrote this amusing sonnet describing the results.
I’ve grown a goitre by dwelling in this den–
As cats from stagnant streams in Lombardy,
Or in what other land they hap to be–
Which drives the belly close beneath the chin:

My beard turns up to heaven; my nape falls in,
Fixed on my spine: my breast-bone visibly
Grows like a harp: a rich embroidery
Bedews my face from brush-drops thick and thin.

My loins into my paunch like levers grind:
My buttock like a crupper bears my weight;
My feet unguided wander to and fro;
In front my skin grows loose and long; behind,

By bending it becomes more taut and strait;
Crosswise I strain me like a Syrian bow:
Whence false and quaint, I know,
Must be the fruit of squinting brain and eye;

For ill can aim the gun that bends awry.
Come then, Giovanni, try
To succour my dead pictures and my fame;
Since foul I fare and painting is my shame.

This six-tile mural from the first half of the 20th century, depicts
Michelangelo’s magnificent Libyan Sibyl, Phemonoe, the daughter of Zeus and Poseidon’s daughter, Lamia. Phemonoe foretold the “coming of the day when that which is hidden shall be revealed”.

Each of the 6 tiles are 12″ x 12″, with the full image 36″ x 24″.  1st half, 20th century

I have also added a link to view the full ceiling.
https://upload.wikimedia.org/…/07/CAPPELLA_SISTINA_Ceiling.…

36 x 24 inches

91.44 x 60.96 cm

$3500




More items related to: , , ,

6-Tile Mural, Libyan Sibyl from Sistine Chapel

Michelangelo di Lodovico Buonarroti Simoni (1475-1564), universally known simply as Michelangelo, was arguably the greatest artist of all time. His sculpture of David is probably the most famous sculpture in the world and his frescoes on the ceiling of the Sistine Chapel are possibly man’s greatest achievement in the history of painting.

Despite his distaste for painting (he was a sculptor and considered painting to be less serious), he reluctantly accepted the commission of this arduous project from Pope Julius II in 1508. Painted between 1508 and 1512, the Sistine Chapel ceiling features 343 figures within more than 5000 square feet of painted ceiling.

Contrary to popular belief, Michelangelo did not paint the ceiling while laying on his back. Holes were drilled into the walls above the windows in the room from which brackets were placed to support a large flat scaffold on which he stood to paint. Even so, the work was physically demanding and Michelangelo wrote this amusing sonnet describing the results.
I’ve grown a goitre by dwelling in this den–
As cats from stagnant streams in Lombardy,
Or in what other land they hap to be–
Which drives the belly close beneath the chin:

My beard turns up to heaven; my nape falls in,
Fixed on my spine: my breast-bone visibly
Grows like a harp: a rich embroidery
Bedews my face from brush-drops thick and thin.

My loins into my paunch like levers grind:
My buttock like a crupper bears my weight;
My feet unguided wander to and fro;
In front my skin grows loose and long; behind,

By bending it becomes more taut and strait;
Crosswise I strain me like a Syrian bow:
Whence false and quaint, I know,
Must be the fruit of squinting brain and eye;

For ill can aim the gun that bends awry.
Come then, Giovanni, try
To succour my dead pictures and my fame;
Since foul I fare and painting is my shame.

This six-tile mural from the first half of the 20th century, depicts
Michelangelo’s magnificent Libyan Sibyl, Phemonoe, the daughter of Zeus and Poseidon’s daughter, Lamia. Phemonoe foretold the “coming of the day when that which is hidden shall be revealed”.

Each of the 6 tiles are 12″ x 12″, with the full image 36″ x 24″.  1st half, 20th century

I have also added a link to view the full ceiling.
https://upload.wikimedia.org/…/07/CAPPELLA_SISTINA_Ceiling.…

36 x 24 inches

91.44 x 60.96 cm

$3500




More items related to: , , ,

6-Tile Mural, Libyan Sibyl from Sistine Chapel

Michelangelo di Lodovico Buonarroti Simoni (1475-1564), universally known simply as Michelangelo, was arguably the greatest artist of all time. His sculpture of David is probably the most famous sculpture in the world and his frescoes on the ceiling of the Sistine Chapel are possibly man’s greatest achievement in the history of painting.

Despite his distaste for painting (he was a sculptor and considered painting to be less serious), he reluctantly accepted the commission of this arduous project from Pope Julius II in 1508. Painted between 1508 and 1512, the Sistine Chapel ceiling features 343 figures within more than 5000 square feet of painted ceiling.

Contrary to popular belief, Michelangelo did not paint the ceiling while laying on his back. Holes were drilled into the walls above the windows in the room from which brackets were placed to support a large flat scaffold on which he stood to paint. Even so, the work was physically demanding and Michelangelo wrote this amusing sonnet describing the results.
I’ve grown a goitre by dwelling in this den–
As cats from stagnant streams in Lombardy,
Or in what other land they hap to be–
Which drives the belly close beneath the chin:

My beard turns up to heaven; my nape falls in,
Fixed on my spine: my breast-bone visibly
Grows like a harp: a rich embroidery
Bedews my face from brush-drops thick and thin.

My loins into my paunch like levers grind:
My buttock like a crupper bears my weight;
My feet unguided wander to and fro;
In front my skin grows loose and long; behind,

By bending it becomes more taut and strait;
Crosswise I strain me like a Syrian bow:
Whence false and quaint, I know,
Must be the fruit of squinting brain and eye;

For ill can aim the gun that bends awry.
Come then, Giovanni, try
To succour my dead pictures and my fame;
Since foul I fare and painting is my shame.

This six-tile mural from the first half of the 20th century, depicts
Michelangelo’s magnificent Libyan Sibyl, Phemonoe, the daughter of Zeus and Poseidon’s daughter, Lamia. Phemonoe foretold the “coming of the day when that which is hidden shall be revealed”.

Each of the 6 tiles are 12″ x 12″, with the full image 36″ x 24″.  1st half, 20th century

I have also added a link to view the full ceiling.
https://upload.wikimedia.org/…/07/CAPPELLA_SISTINA_Ceiling.…

36 x 24 inches

91.44 x 60.96 cm

$3500




More items related to: , , ,

6-Tile Mural, Libyan Sibyl from Sistine Chapel

Michelangelo di Lodovico Buonarroti Simoni (1475-1564), universally known simply as Michelangelo, was arguably the greatest artist of all time. His sculpture of David is probably the most famous sculpture in the world and his frescoes on the ceiling of the Sistine Chapel are possibly man’s greatest achievement in the history of painting.

Despite his distaste for painting (he was a sculptor and considered painting to be less serious), he reluctantly accepted the commission of this arduous project from Pope Julius II in 1508. Painted between 1508 and 1512, the Sistine Chapel ceiling features 343 figures within more than 5000 square feet of painted ceiling.

Contrary to popular belief, Michelangelo did not paint the ceiling while laying on his back. Holes were drilled into the walls above the windows in the room from which brackets were placed to support a large flat scaffold on which he stood to paint. Even so, the work was physically demanding and Michelangelo wrote this amusing sonnet describing the results.
I’ve grown a goitre by dwelling in this den–
As cats from stagnant streams in Lombardy,
Or in what other land they hap to be–
Which drives the belly close beneath the chin:

My beard turns up to heaven; my nape falls in,
Fixed on my spine: my breast-bone visibly
Grows like a harp: a rich embroidery
Bedews my face from brush-drops thick and thin.

My loins into my paunch like levers grind:
My buttock like a crupper bears my weight;
My feet unguided wander to and fro;
In front my skin grows loose and long; behind,

By bending it becomes more taut and strait;
Crosswise I strain me like a Syrian bow:
Whence false and quaint, I know,
Must be the fruit of squinting brain and eye;

For ill can aim the gun that bends awry.
Come then, Giovanni, try
To succour my dead pictures and my fame;
Since foul I fare and painting is my shame.

This six-tile mural from the first half of the 20th century, depicts
Michelangelo’s magnificent Libyan Sibyl, Phemonoe, the daughter of Zeus and Poseidon’s daughter, Lamia. Phemonoe foretold the “coming of the day when that which is hidden shall be revealed”.

Each of the 6 tiles are 12″ x 12″, with the full image 36″ x 24″.  1st half, 20th century

I have also added a link to view the full ceiling.
https://upload.wikimedia.org/…/07/CAPPELLA_SISTINA_Ceiling.…

36 x 24 inches

91.44 x 60.96 cm

$3500




More items related to: , , ,

6-Tile Mural, Libyan Sibyl from Sistine Chapel

Michelangelo di Lodovico Buonarroti Simoni (1475-1564), universally known simply as Michelangelo, was arguably the greatest artist of all time. His sculpture of David is probably the most famous sculpture in the world and his frescoes on the ceiling of the Sistine Chapel are possibly man’s greatest achievement in the history of painting.

Despite his distaste for painting (he was a sculptor and considered painting to be less serious), he reluctantly accepted the commission of this arduous project from Pope Julius II in 1508. Painted between 1508 and 1512, the Sistine Chapel ceiling features 343 figures within more than 5000 square feet of painted ceiling.

Contrary to popular belief, Michelangelo did not paint the ceiling while laying on his back. Holes were drilled into the walls above the windows in the room from which brackets were placed to support a large flat scaffold on which he stood to paint. Even so, the work was physically demanding and Michelangelo wrote this amusing sonnet describing the results.
I’ve grown a goitre by dwelling in this den–
As cats from stagnant streams in Lombardy,
Or in what other land they hap to be–
Which drives the belly close beneath the chin:

My beard turns up to heaven; my nape falls in,
Fixed on my spine: my breast-bone visibly
Grows like a harp: a rich embroidery
Bedews my face from brush-drops thick and thin.

My loins into my paunch like levers grind:
My buttock like a crupper bears my weight;
My feet unguided wander to and fro;
In front my skin grows loose and long; behind,

By bending it becomes more taut and strait;
Crosswise I strain me like a Syrian bow:
Whence false and quaint, I know,
Must be the fruit of squinting brain and eye;

For ill can aim the gun that bends awry.
Come then, Giovanni, try
To succour my dead pictures and my fame;
Since foul I fare and painting is my shame.

This six-tile mural from the first half of the 20th century, depicts
Michelangelo’s magnificent Libyan Sibyl, Phemonoe, the daughter of Zeus and Poseidon’s daughter, Lamia. Phemonoe foretold the “coming of the day when that which is hidden shall be revealed”.

Each of the 6 tiles are 12″ x 12″, with the full image 36″ x 24″.  1st half, 20th century

I have also added a link to view the full ceiling.
https://upload.wikimedia.org/…/07/CAPPELLA_SISTINA_Ceiling.…

36 x 24 inches

91.44 x 60.96 cm

$3500




More items related to: , , ,

6-Tile Mural, Libyan Sibyl from Sistine Chapel

Michelangelo di Lodovico Buonarroti Simoni (1475-1564), universally known simply as Michelangelo, was arguably the greatest artist of all time. His sculpture of David is probably the most famous sculpture in the world and his frescoes on the ceiling of the Sistine Chapel are possibly man’s greatest achievement in the history of painting.

Despite his distaste for painting (he was a sculptor and considered painting to be less serious), he reluctantly accepted the commission of this arduous project from Pope Julius II in 1508. Painted between 1508 and 1512, the Sistine Chapel ceiling features 343 figures within more than 5000 square feet of painted ceiling.

Contrary to popular belief, Michelangelo did not paint the ceiling while laying on his back. Holes were drilled into the walls above the windows in the room from which brackets were placed to support a large flat scaffold on which he stood to paint. Even so, the work was physically demanding and Michelangelo wrote this amusing sonnet describing the results.
I’ve grown a goitre by dwelling in this den–
As cats from stagnant streams in Lombardy,
Or in what other land they hap to be–
Which drives the belly close beneath the chin:

My beard turns up to heaven; my nape falls in,
Fixed on my spine: my breast-bone visibly
Grows like a harp: a rich embroidery
Bedews my face from brush-drops thick and thin.

My loins into my paunch like levers grind:
My buttock like a crupper bears my weight;
My feet unguided wander to and fro;
In front my skin grows loose and long; behind,

By bending it becomes more taut and strait;
Crosswise I strain me like a Syrian bow:
Whence false and quaint, I know,
Must be the fruit of squinting brain and eye;

For ill can aim the gun that bends awry.
Come then, Giovanni, try
To succour my dead pictures and my fame;
Since foul I fare and painting is my shame.

This six-tile mural from the first half of the 20th century, depicts
Michelangelo’s magnificent Libyan Sibyl, Phemonoe, the daughter of Zeus and Poseidon’s daughter, Lamia. Phemonoe foretold the “coming of the day when that which is hidden shall be revealed”.

Each of the 6 tiles are 12″ x 12″, with the full image 36″ x 24″.  1st half, 20th century

I have also added a link to view the full ceiling.
https://upload.wikimedia.org/…/07/CAPPELLA_SISTINA_Ceiling.…

36 x 24 inches

91.44 x 60.96 cm

$3500




More items related to: , , ,

6-Tile Mural, Libyan Sibyl from Sistine Chapel

Michelangelo di Lodovico Buonarroti Simoni (1475-1564), universally known simply as Michelangelo, was arguably the greatest artist of all time. His sculpture of David is probably the most famous sculpture in the world and his frescoes on the ceiling of the Sistine Chapel are possibly man’s greatest achievement in the history of painting.

Despite his distaste for painting (he was a sculptor and considered painting to be less serious), he reluctantly accepted the commission of this arduous project from Pope Julius II in 1508. Painted between 1508 and 1512, the Sistine Chapel ceiling features 343 figures within more than 5000 square feet of painted ceiling.

Contrary to popular belief, Michelangelo did not paint the ceiling while laying on his back. Holes were drilled into the walls above the windows in the room from which brackets were placed to support a large flat scaffold on which he stood to paint. Even so, the work was physically demanding and Michelangelo wrote this amusing sonnet describing the results.
I’ve grown a goitre by dwelling in this den–
As cats from stagnant streams in Lombardy,
Or in what other land they hap to be–
Which drives the belly close beneath the chin:

My beard turns up to heaven; my nape falls in,
Fixed on my spine: my breast-bone visibly
Grows like a harp: a rich embroidery
Bedews my face from brush-drops thick and thin.

My loins into my paunch like levers grind:
My buttock like a crupper bears my weight;
My feet unguided wander to and fro;
In front my skin grows loose and long; behind,

By bending it becomes more taut and strait;
Crosswise I strain me like a Syrian bow:
Whence false and quaint, I know,
Must be the fruit of squinting brain and eye;

For ill can aim the gun that bends awry.
Come then, Giovanni, try
To succour my dead pictures and my fame;
Since foul I fare and painting is my shame.

This six-tile mural from the first half of the 20th century, depicts
Michelangelo’s magnificent Libyan Sibyl, Phemonoe, the daughter of Zeus and Poseidon’s daughter, Lamia. Phemonoe foretold the “coming of the day when that which is hidden shall be revealed”.

Each of the 6 tiles are 12″ x 12″, with the full image 36″ x 24″.  1st half, 20th century

I have also added a link to view the full ceiling.
https://upload.wikimedia.org/…/07/CAPPELLA_SISTINA_Ceiling.…

36 x 24 inches

91.44 x 60.96 cm

$3500




More items related to: , , ,

6-Tile Mural, Libyan Sibyl from Sistine Chapel

Michelangelo di Lodovico Buonarroti Simoni (1475-1564), universally known simply as Michelangelo, was arguably the greatest artist of all time. His sculpture of David is probably the most famous sculpture in the world and his frescoes on the ceiling of the Sistine Chapel are possibly man’s greatest achievement in the history of painting.

Despite his distaste for painting (he was a sculptor and considered painting to be less serious), he reluctantly accepted the commission of this arduous project from Pope Julius II in 1508. Painted between 1508 and 1512, the Sistine Chapel ceiling features 343 figures within more than 5000 square feet of painted ceiling.

Contrary to popular belief, Michelangelo did not paint the ceiling while laying on his back. Holes were drilled into the walls above the windows in the room from which brackets were placed to support a large flat scaffold on which he stood to paint. Even so, the work was physically demanding and Michelangelo wrote this amusing sonnet describing the results.
I’ve grown a goitre by dwelling in this den–
As cats from stagnant streams in Lombardy,
Or in what other land they hap to be–
Which drives the belly close beneath the chin:

My beard turns up to heaven; my nape falls in,
Fixed on my spine: my breast-bone visibly
Grows like a harp: a rich embroidery
Bedews my face from brush-drops thick and thin.

My loins into my paunch like levers grind:
My buttock like a crupper bears my weight;
My feet unguided wander to and fro;
In front my skin grows loose and long; behind,

By bending it becomes more taut and strait;
Crosswise I strain me like a Syrian bow:
Whence false and quaint, I know,
Must be the fruit of squinting brain and eye;

For ill can aim the gun that bends awry.
Come then, Giovanni, try
To succour my dead pictures and my fame;
Since foul I fare and painting is my shame.

This six-tile mural from the first half of the 20th century, depicts
Michelangelo’s magnificent Libyan Sibyl, Phemonoe, the daughter of Zeus and Poseidon’s daughter, Lamia. Phemonoe foretold the “coming of the day when that which is hidden shall be revealed”.

Each of the 6 tiles are 12″ x 12″, with the full image 36″ x 24″.  1st half, 20th century

I have also added a link to view the full ceiling.
https://upload.wikimedia.org/…/07/CAPPELLA_SISTINA_Ceiling.…

36 x 24 inches

91.44 x 60.96 cm

$3500




More items related to: , , ,

6-Tile Mural, Libyan Sibyl from Sistine Chapel

Michelangelo di Lodovico Buonarroti Simoni (1475-1564), universally known simply as Michelangelo, was arguably the greatest artist of all time. His sculpture of David is probably the most famous sculpture in the world and his frescoes on the ceiling of the Sistine Chapel are possibly man’s greatest achievement in the history of painting.

Despite his distaste for painting (he was a sculptor and considered painting to be less serious), he reluctantly accepted the commission of this arduous project from Pope Julius II in 1508. Painted between 1508 and 1512, the Sistine Chapel ceiling features 343 figures within more than 5000 square feet of painted ceiling.

Contrary to popular belief, Michelangelo did not paint the ceiling while laying on his back. Holes were drilled into the walls above the windows in the room from which brackets were placed to support a large flat scaffold on which he stood to paint. Even so, the work was physically demanding and Michelangelo wrote this amusing sonnet describing the results.
I’ve grown a goitre by dwelling in this den–
As cats from stagnant streams in Lombardy,
Or in what other land they hap to be–
Which drives the belly close beneath the chin:

My beard turns up to heaven; my nape falls in,
Fixed on my spine: my breast-bone visibly
Grows like a harp: a rich embroidery
Bedews my face from brush-drops thick and thin.

My loins into my paunch like levers grind:
My buttock like a crupper bears my weight;
My feet unguided wander to and fro;
In front my skin grows loose and long; behind,

By bending it becomes more taut and strait;
Crosswise I strain me like a Syrian bow:
Whence false and quaint, I know,
Must be the fruit of squinting brain and eye;

For ill can aim the gun that bends awry.
Come then, Giovanni, try
To succour my dead pictures and my fame;
Since foul I fare and painting is my shame.

This six-tile mural from the first half of the 20th century, depicts
Michelangelo’s magnificent Libyan Sibyl, Phemonoe, the daughter of Zeus and Poseidon’s daughter, Lamia. Phemonoe foretold the “coming of the day when that which is hidden shall be revealed”.

Each of the 6 tiles are 12″ x 12″, with the full image 36″ x 24″.  1st half, 20th century

I have also added a link to view the full ceiling.
https://upload.wikimedia.org/…/07/CAPPELLA_SISTINA_Ceiling.…

36 x 24 inches

91.44 x 60.96 cm

$3500




More items related to: , , ,

6-Tile Mural, Libyan Sibyl from Sistine Chapel

Michelangelo di Lodovico Buonarroti Simoni (1475-1564), universally known simply as Michelangelo, was arguably the greatest artist of all time. His sculpture of David is probably the most famous sculpture in the world and his frescoes on the ceiling of the Sistine Chapel are possibly man’s greatest achievement in the history of painting.

Despite his distaste for painting (he was a sculptor and considered painting to be less serious), he reluctantly accepted the commission of this arduous project from Pope Julius II in 1508. Painted between 1508 and 1512, the Sistine Chapel ceiling features 343 figures within more than 5000 square feet of painted ceiling.

Contrary to popular belief, Michelangelo did not paint the ceiling while laying on his back. Holes were drilled into the walls above the windows in the room from which brackets were placed to support a large flat scaffold on which he stood to paint. Even so, the work was physically demanding and Michelangelo wrote this amusing sonnet describing the results.
I’ve grown a goitre by dwelling in this den–
As cats from stagnant streams in Lombardy,
Or in what other land they hap to be–
Which drives the belly close beneath the chin:

My beard turns up to heaven; my nape falls in,
Fixed on my spine: my breast-bone visibly
Grows like a harp: a rich embroidery
Bedews my face from brush-drops thick and thin.

My loins into my paunch like levers grind:
My buttock like a crupper bears my weight;
My feet unguided wander to and fro;
In front my skin grows loose and long; behind,

By bending it becomes more taut and strait;
Crosswise I strain me like a Syrian bow:
Whence false and quaint, I know,
Must be the fruit of squinting brain and eye;

For ill can aim the gun that bends awry.
Come then, Giovanni, try
To succour my dead pictures and my fame;
Since foul I fare and painting is my shame.

This six-tile mural from the first half of the 20th century, depicts
Michelangelo’s magnificent Libyan Sibyl, Phemonoe, the daughter of Zeus and Poseidon’s daughter, Lamia. Phemonoe foretold the “coming of the day when that which is hidden shall be revealed”.

Each of the 6 tiles are 12″ x 12″, with the full image 36″ x 24″.  1st half, 20th century

I have also added a link to view the full ceiling.
https://upload.wikimedia.org/…/07/CAPPELLA_SISTINA_Ceiling.…

36 x 24 inches

91.44 x 60.96 cm

$3500




More items related to: , , ,

6-Tile Mural, Libyan Sibyl from Sistine Chapel

Michelangelo di Lodovico Buonarroti Simoni (1475-1564), universally known simply as Michelangelo, was arguably the greatest artist of all time. His sculpture of David is probably the most famous sculpture in the world and his frescoes on the ceiling of the Sistine Chapel are possibly man’s greatest achievement in the history of painting.

Despite his distaste for painting (he was a sculptor and considered painting to be less serious), he reluctantly accepted the commission of this arduous project from Pope Julius II in 1508. Painted between 1508 and 1512, the Sistine Chapel ceiling features 343 figures within more than 5000 square feet of painted ceiling.

Contrary to popular belief, Michelangelo did not paint the ceiling while laying on his back. Holes were drilled into the walls above the windows in the room from which brackets were placed to support a large flat scaffold on which he stood to paint. Even so, the work was physically demanding and Michelangelo wrote this amusing sonnet describing the results.
I’ve grown a goitre by dwelling in this den–
As cats from stagnant streams in Lombardy,
Or in what other land they hap to be–
Which drives the belly close beneath the chin:

My beard turns up to heaven; my nape falls in,
Fixed on my spine: my breast-bone visibly
Grows like a harp: a rich embroidery
Bedews my face from brush-drops thick and thin.

My loins into my paunch like levers grind:
My buttock like a crupper bears my weight;
My feet unguided wander to and fro;
In front my skin grows loose and long; behind,

By bending it becomes more taut and strait;
Crosswise I strain me like a Syrian bow:
Whence false and quaint, I know,
Must be the fruit of squinting brain and eye;

For ill can aim the gun that bends awry.
Come then, Giovanni, try
To succour my dead pictures and my fame;
Since foul I fare and painting is my shame.

This six-tile mural from the first half of the 20th century, depicts
Michelangelo’s magnificent Libyan Sibyl, Phemonoe, the daughter of Zeus and Poseidon’s daughter, Lamia. Phemonoe foretold the “coming of the day when that which is hidden shall be revealed”.

Each of the 6 tiles are 12″ x 12″, with the full image 36″ x 24″.  1st half, 20th century

I have also added a link to view the full ceiling.
https://upload.wikimedia.org/…/07/CAPPELLA_SISTINA_Ceiling.…

36 x 24 inches

91.44 x 60.96 cm

$3500




More items related to: , , ,

6-Tile Mural, Libyan Sibyl from Sistine Chapel

Michelangelo di Lodovico Buonarroti Simoni (1475-1564), universally known simply as Michelangelo, was arguably the greatest artist of all time. His sculpture of David is probably the most famous sculpture in the world and his frescoes on the ceiling of the Sistine Chapel are possibly man’s greatest achievement in the history of painting.

Despite his distaste for painting (he was a sculptor and considered painting to be less serious), he reluctantly accepted the commission of this arduous project from Pope Julius II in 1508. Painted between 1508 and 1512, the Sistine Chapel ceiling features 343 figures within more than 5000 square feet of painted ceiling.

Contrary to popular belief, Michelangelo did not paint the ceiling while laying on his back. Holes were drilled into the walls above the windows in the room from which brackets were placed to support a large flat scaffold on which he stood to paint. Even so, the work was physically demanding and Michelangelo wrote this amusing sonnet describing the results.
I’ve grown a goitre by dwelling in this den–
As cats from stagnant streams in Lombardy,
Or in what other land they hap to be–
Which drives the belly close beneath the chin:

My beard turns up to heaven; my nape falls in,
Fixed on my spine: my breast-bone visibly
Grows like a harp: a rich embroidery
Bedews my face from brush-drops thick and thin.

My loins into my paunch like levers grind:
My buttock like a crupper bears my weight;
My feet unguided wander to and fro;
In front my skin grows loose and long; behind,

By bending it becomes more taut and strait;
Crosswise I strain me like a Syrian bow:
Whence false and quaint, I know,
Must be the fruit of squinting brain and eye;

For ill can aim the gun that bends awry.
Come then, Giovanni, try
To succour my dead pictures and my fame;
Since foul I fare and painting is my shame.

This six-tile mural from the first half of the 20th century, depicts
Michelangelo’s magnificent Libyan Sibyl, Phemonoe, the daughter of Zeus and Poseidon’s daughter, Lamia. Phemonoe foretold the “coming of the day when that which is hidden shall be revealed”.

Each of the 6 tiles are 12″ x 12″, with the full image 36″ x 24″.  1st half, 20th century

I have also added a link to view the full ceiling.
https://upload.wikimedia.org/…/07/CAPPELLA_SISTINA_Ceiling.…

36 x 24 inches

91.44 x 60.96 cm

$3500




More items related to: , , ,

6-Tile Mural, Libyan Sibyl from Sistine Chapel

Michelangelo di Lodovico Buonarroti Simoni (1475-1564), universally known simply as Michelangelo, was arguably the greatest artist of all time. His sculpture of David is probably the most famous sculpture in the world and his frescoes on the ceiling of the Sistine Chapel are possibly man’s greatest achievement in the history of painting.

Despite his distaste for painting (he was a sculptor and considered painting to be less serious), he reluctantly accepted the commission of this arduous project from Pope Julius II in 1508. Painted between 1508 and 1512, the Sistine Chapel ceiling features 343 figures within more than 5000 square feet of painted ceiling.

Contrary to popular belief, Michelangelo did not paint the ceiling while laying on his back. Holes were drilled into the walls above the windows in the room from which brackets were placed to support a large flat scaffold on which he stood to paint. Even so, the work was physically demanding and Michelangelo wrote this amusing sonnet describing the results.
I’ve grown a goitre by dwelling in this den–
As cats from stagnant streams in Lombardy,
Or in what other land they hap to be–
Which drives the belly close beneath the chin:

My beard turns up to heaven; my nape falls in,
Fixed on my spine: my breast-bone visibly
Grows like a harp: a rich embroidery
Bedews my face from brush-drops thick and thin.

My loins into my paunch like levers grind:
My buttock like a crupper bears my weight;
My feet unguided wander to and fro;
In front my skin grows loose and long; behind,

By bending it becomes more taut and strait;
Crosswise I strain me like a Syrian bow:
Whence false and quaint, I know,
Must be the fruit of squinting brain and eye;

For ill can aim the gun that bends awry.
Come then, Giovanni, try
To succour my dead pictures and my fame;
Since foul I fare and painting is my shame.

This six-tile mural from the first half of the 20th century, depicts
Michelangelo’s magnificent Libyan Sibyl, Phemonoe, the daughter of Zeus and Poseidon’s daughter, Lamia. Phemonoe foretold the “coming of the day when that which is hidden shall be revealed”.

Each of the 6 tiles are 12″ x 12″, with the full image 36″ x 24″.  1st half, 20th century

I have also added a link to view the full ceiling.
https://upload.wikimedia.org/…/07/CAPPELLA_SISTINA_Ceiling.…

36 x 24 inches

91.44 x 60.96 cm

$3500




More items related to: , , ,

6-Tile Mural, Libyan Sibyl from Sistine Chapel

Michelangelo di Lodovico Buonarroti Simoni (1475-1564), universally known simply as Michelangelo, was arguably the greatest artist of all time. His sculpture of David is probably the most famous sculpture in the world and his frescoes on the ceiling of the Sistine Chapel are possibly man’s greatest achievement in the history of painting.

Despite his distaste for painting (he was a sculptor and considered painting to be less serious), he reluctantly accepted the commission of this arduous project from Pope Julius II in 1508. Painted between 1508 and 1512, the Sistine Chapel ceiling features 343 figures within more than 5000 square feet of painted ceiling.

Contrary to popular belief, Michelangelo did not paint the ceiling while laying on his back. Holes were drilled into the walls above the windows in the room from which brackets were placed to support a large flat scaffold on which he stood to paint. Even so, the work was physically demanding and Michelangelo wrote this amusing sonnet describing the results.
I’ve grown a goitre by dwelling in this den–
As cats from stagnant streams in Lombardy,
Or in what other land they hap to be–
Which drives the belly close beneath the chin:

My beard turns up to heaven; my nape falls in,
Fixed on my spine: my breast-bone visibly
Grows like a harp: a rich embroidery
Bedews my face from brush-drops thick and thin.

My loins into my paunch like levers grind:
My buttock like a crupper bears my weight;
My feet unguided wander to and fro;
In front my skin grows loose and long; behind,

By bending it becomes more taut and strait;
Crosswise I strain me like a Syrian bow:
Whence false and quaint, I know,
Must be the fruit of squinting brain and eye;

For ill can aim the gun that bends awry.
Come then, Giovanni, try
To succour my dead pictures and my fame;
Since foul I fare and painting is my shame.

This six-tile mural from the first half of the 20th century, depicts
Michelangelo’s magnificent Libyan Sibyl, Phemonoe, the daughter of Zeus and Poseidon’s daughter, Lamia. Phemonoe foretold the “coming of the day when that which is hidden shall be revealed”.

Each of the 6 tiles are 12″ x 12″, with the full image 36″ x 24″.  1st half, 20th century

I have also added a link to view the full ceiling.
https://upload.wikimedia.org/…/07/CAPPELLA_SISTINA_Ceiling.…

36 x 24 inches

91.44 x 60.96 cm

$3500




More items related to: , , ,

6-Tile Mural, Libyan Sibyl from Sistine Chapel

Michelangelo di Lodovico Buonarroti Simoni (1475-1564), universally known simply as Michelangelo, was arguably the greatest artist of all time. His sculpture of David is probably the most famous sculpture in the world and his frescoes on the ceiling of the Sistine Chapel are possibly man’s greatest achievement in the history of painting.

Despite his distaste for painting (he was a sculptor and considered painting to be less serious), he reluctantly accepted the commission of this arduous project from Pope Julius II in 1508. Painted between 1508 and 1512, the Sistine Chapel ceiling features 343 figures within more than 5000 square feet of painted ceiling.

Contrary to popular belief, Michelangelo did not paint the ceiling while laying on his back. Holes were drilled into the walls above the windows in the room from which brackets were placed to support a large flat scaffold on which he stood to paint. Even so, the work was physically demanding and Michelangelo wrote this amusing sonnet describing the results.
I’ve grown a goitre by dwelling in this den–
As cats from stagnant streams in Lombardy,
Or in what other land they hap to be–
Which drives the belly close beneath the chin:

My beard turns up to heaven; my nape falls in,
Fixed on my spine: my breast-bone visibly
Grows like a harp: a rich embroidery
Bedews my face from brush-drops thick and thin.

My loins into my paunch like levers grind:
My buttock like a crupper bears my weight;
My feet unguided wander to and fro;
In front my skin grows loose and long; behind,

By bending it becomes more taut and strait;
Crosswise I strain me like a Syrian bow:
Whence false and quaint, I know,
Must be the fruit of squinting brain and eye;

For ill can aim the gun that bends awry.
Come then, Giovanni, try
To succour my dead pictures and my fame;
Since foul I fare and painting is my shame.

This six-tile mural from the first half of the 20th century, depicts
Michelangelo’s magnificent Libyan Sibyl, Phemonoe, the daughter of Zeus and Poseidon’s daughter, Lamia. Phemonoe foretold the “coming of the day when that which is hidden shall be revealed”.

Each of the 6 tiles are 12″ x 12″, with the full image 36″ x 24″.  1st half, 20th century

I have also added a link to view the full ceiling.
https://upload.wikimedia.org/…/07/CAPPELLA_SISTINA_Ceiling.…

36 x 24 inches

91.44 x 60.96 cm

$3500




More items related to: , , ,

6-Tile Mural, Libyan Sibyl from Sistine Chapel

Michelangelo di Lodovico Buonarroti Simoni (1475-1564), universally known simply as Michelangelo, was arguably the greatest artist of all time. His sculpture of David is probably the most famous sculpture in the world and his frescoes on the ceiling of the Sistine Chapel are possibly man’s greatest achievement in the history of painting.

Despite his distaste for painting (he was a sculptor and considered painting to be less serious), he reluctantly accepted the commission of this arduous project from Pope Julius II in 1508. Painted between 1508 and 1512, the Sistine Chapel ceiling features 343 figures within more than 5000 square feet of painted ceiling.

Contrary to popular belief, Michelangelo did not paint the ceiling while laying on his back. Holes were drilled into the walls above the windows in the room from which brackets were placed to support a large flat scaffold on which he stood to paint. Even so, the work was physically demanding and Michelangelo wrote this amusing sonnet describing the results.
I’ve grown a goitre by dwelling in this den–
As cats from stagnant streams in Lombardy,
Or in what other land they hap to be–
Which drives the belly close beneath the chin:

My beard turns up to heaven; my nape falls in,
Fixed on my spine: my breast-bone visibly
Grows like a harp: a rich embroidery
Bedews my face from brush-drops thick and thin.

My loins into my paunch like levers grind:
My buttock like a crupper bears my weight;
My feet unguided wander to and fro;
In front my skin grows loose and long; behind,

By bending it becomes more taut and strait;
Crosswise I strain me like a Syrian bow:
Whence false and quaint, I know,
Must be the fruit of squinting brain and eye;

For ill can aim the gun that bends awry.
Come then, Giovanni, try
To succour my dead pictures and my fame;
Since foul I fare and painting is my shame.

This six-tile mural from the first half of the 20th century, depicts
Michelangelo’s magnificent Libyan Sibyl, Phemonoe, the daughter of Zeus and Poseidon’s daughter, Lamia. Phemonoe foretold the “coming of the day when that which is hidden shall be revealed”.

Each of the 6 tiles are 12″ x 12″, with the full image 36″ x 24″.  1st half, 20th century

I have also added a link to view the full ceiling.
https://upload.wikimedia.org/…/07/CAPPELLA_SISTINA_Ceiling.…

36 x 24 inches

91.44 x 60.96 cm

$3500




More items related to: , , ,

6-Tile Mural, Libyan Sibyl from Sistine Chapel

Michelangelo di Lodovico Buonarroti Simoni (1475-1564), universally known simply as Michelangelo, was arguably the greatest artist of all time. His sculpture of David is probably the most famous sculpture in the world and his frescoes on the ceiling of the Sistine Chapel are possibly man’s greatest achievement in the history of painting.

Despite his distaste for painting (he was a sculptor and considered painting to be less serious), he reluctantly accepted the commission of this arduous project from Pope Julius II in 1508. Painted between 1508 and 1512, the Sistine Chapel ceiling features 343 figures within more than 5000 square feet of painted ceiling.

Contrary to popular belief, Michelangelo did not paint the ceiling while laying on his back. Holes were drilled into the walls above the windows in the room from which brackets were placed to support a large flat scaffold on which he stood to paint. Even so, the work was physically demanding and Michelangelo wrote this amusing sonnet describing the results.
I’ve grown a goitre by dwelling in this den–
As cats from stagnant streams in Lombardy,
Or in what other land they hap to be–
Which drives the belly close beneath the chin:

My beard turns up to heaven; my nape falls in,
Fixed on my spine: my breast-bone visibly
Grows like a harp: a rich embroidery
Bedews my face from brush-drops thick and thin.

My loins into my paunch like levers grind:
My buttock like a crupper bears my weight;
My feet unguided wander to and fro;
In front my skin grows loose and long; behind,

By bending it becomes more taut and strait;
Crosswise I strain me like a Syrian bow:
Whence false and quaint, I know,
Must be the fruit of squinting brain and eye;

For ill can aim the gun that bends awry.
Come then, Giovanni, try
To succour my dead pictures and my fame;
Since foul I fare and painting is my shame.

This six-tile mural from the first half of the 20th century, depicts
Michelangelo’s magnificent Libyan Sibyl, Phemonoe, the daughter of Zeus and Poseidon’s daughter, Lamia. Phemonoe foretold the “coming of the day when that which is hidden shall be revealed”.

Each of the 6 tiles are 12″ x 12″, with the full image 36″ x 24″.  1st half, 20th century

I have also added a link to view the full ceiling.
https://upload.wikimedia.org/…/07/CAPPELLA_SISTINA_Ceiling.…

36 x 24 inches

91.44 x 60.96 cm

$3500




More items related to: , , ,

6-Tile Mural, Libyan Sibyl from Sistine Chapel

Michelangelo di Lodovico Buonarroti Simoni (1475-1564), universally known simply as Michelangelo, was arguably the greatest artist of all time. His sculpture of David is probably the most famous sculpture in the world and his frescoes on the ceiling of the Sistine Chapel are possibly man’s greatest achievement in the history of painting.

Despite his distaste for painting (he was a sculptor and considered painting to be less serious), he reluctantly accepted the commission of this arduous project from Pope Julius II in 1508. Painted between 1508 and 1512, the Sistine Chapel ceiling features 343 figures within more than 5000 square feet of painted ceiling.

Contrary to popular belief, Michelangelo did not paint the ceiling while laying on his back. Holes were drilled into the walls above the windows in the room from which brackets were placed to support a large flat scaffold on which he stood to paint. Even so, the work was physically demanding and Michelangelo wrote this amusing sonnet describing the results.
I’ve grown a goitre by dwelling in this den–
As cats from stagnant streams in Lombardy,
Or in what other land they hap to be–
Which drives the belly close beneath the chin:

My beard turns up to heaven; my nape falls in,
Fixed on my spine: my breast-bone visibly
Grows like a harp: a rich embroidery
Bedews my face from brush-drops thick and thin.

My loins into my paunch like levers grind:
My buttock like a crupper bears my weight;
My feet unguided wander to and fro;
In front my skin grows loose and long; behind,

By bending it becomes more taut and strait;
Crosswise I strain me like a Syrian bow:
Whence false and quaint, I know,
Must be the fruit of squinting brain and eye;

For ill can aim the gun that bends awry.
Come then, Giovanni, try
To succour my dead pictures and my fame;
Since foul I fare and painting is my shame.

This six-tile mural from the first half of the 20th century, depicts
Michelangelo’s magnificent Libyan Sibyl, Phemonoe, the daughter of Zeus and Poseidon’s daughter, Lamia. Phemonoe foretold the “coming of the day when that which is hidden shall be revealed”.

Each of the 6 tiles are 12″ x 12″, with the full image 36″ x 24″.  1st half, 20th century

I have also added a link to view the full ceiling.
https://upload.wikimedia.org/…/07/CAPPELLA_SISTINA_Ceiling.…

36 x 24 inches

91.44 x 60.96 cm

$3500




More items related to: , , ,

6-Tile Mural, Libyan Sibyl from Sistine Chapel

Michelangelo di Lodovico Buonarroti Simoni (1475-1564), universally known simply as Michelangelo, was arguably the greatest artist of all time. His sculpture of David is probably the most famous sculpture in the world and his frescoes on the ceiling of the Sistine Chapel are possibly man’s greatest achievement in the history of painting.

Despite his distaste for painting (he was a sculptor and considered painting to be less serious), he reluctantly accepted the commission of this arduous project from Pope Julius II in 1508. Painted between 1508 and 1512, the Sistine Chapel ceiling features 343 figures within more than 5000 square feet of painted ceiling.

Contrary to popular belief, Michelangelo did not paint the ceiling while laying on his back. Holes were drilled into the walls above the windows in the room from which brackets were placed to support a large flat scaffold on which he stood to paint. Even so, the work was physically demanding and Michelangelo wrote this amusing sonnet describing the results.
I’ve grown a goitre by dwelling in this den–
As cats from stagnant streams in Lombardy,
Or in what other land they hap to be–
Which drives the belly close beneath the chin:

My beard turns up to heaven; my nape falls in,
Fixed on my spine: my breast-bone visibly
Grows like a harp: a rich embroidery
Bedews my face from brush-drops thick and thin.

My loins into my paunch like levers grind:
My buttock like a crupper bears my weight;
My feet unguided wander to and fro;
In front my skin grows loose and long; behind,

By bending it becomes more taut and strait;
Crosswise I strain me like a Syrian bow:
Whence false and quaint, I know,
Must be the fruit of squinting brain and eye;

For ill can aim the gun that bends awry.
Come then, Giovanni, try
To succour my dead pictures and my fame;
Since foul I fare and painting is my shame.

This six-tile mural from the first half of the 20th century, depicts
Michelangelo’s magnificent Libyan Sibyl, Phemonoe, the daughter of Zeus and Poseidon’s daughter, Lamia. Phemonoe foretold the “coming of the day when that which is hidden shall be revealed”.

Each of the 6 tiles are 12″ x 12″, with the full image 36″ x 24″.  1st half, 20th century

I have also added a link to view the full ceiling.
https://upload.wikimedia.org/…/07/CAPPELLA_SISTINA_Ceiling.…

36 x 24 inches

91.44 x 60.96 cm

$3500




More items related to: , , ,

6-Tile Mural, Libyan Sibyl from Sistine Chapel

Michelangelo di Lodovico Buonarroti Simoni (1475-1564), universally known simply as Michelangelo, was arguably the greatest artist of all time. His sculpture of David is probably the most famous sculpture in the world and his frescoes on the ceiling of the Sistine Chapel are possibly man’s greatest achievement in the history of painting.

Despite his distaste for painting (he was a sculptor and considered painting to be less serious), he reluctantly accepted the commission of this arduous project from Pope Julius II in 1508. Painted between 1508 and 1512, the Sistine Chapel ceiling features 343 figures within more than 5000 square feet of painted ceiling.

Contrary to popular belief, Michelangelo did not paint the ceiling while laying on his back. Holes were drilled into the walls above the windows in the room from which brackets were placed to support a large flat scaffold on which he stood to paint. Even so, the work was physically demanding and Michelangelo wrote this amusing sonnet describing the results.
I’ve grown a goitre by dwelling in this den–
As cats from stagnant streams in Lombardy,
Or in what other land they hap to be–
Which drives the belly close beneath the chin:

My beard turns up to heaven; my nape falls in,
Fixed on my spine: my breast-bone visibly
Grows like a harp: a rich embroidery
Bedews my face from brush-drops thick and thin.

My loins into my paunch like levers grind:
My buttock like a crupper bears my weight;
My feet unguided wander to and fro;
In front my skin grows loose and long; behind,

By bending it becomes more taut and strait;
Crosswise I strain me like a Syrian bow:
Whence false and quaint, I know,
Must be the fruit of squinting brain and eye;

For ill can aim the gun that bends awry.
Come then, Giovanni, try
To succour my dead pictures and my fame;
Since foul I fare and painting is my shame.

This six-tile mural from the first half of the 20th century, depicts
Michelangelo’s magnificent Libyan Sibyl, Phemonoe, the daughter of Zeus and Poseidon’s daughter, Lamia. Phemonoe foretold the “coming of the day when that which is hidden shall be revealed”.

Each of the 6 tiles are 12″ x 12″, with the full image 36″ x 24″.  1st half, 20th century

I have also added a link to view the full ceiling.
https://upload.wikimedia.org/…/07/CAPPELLA_SISTINA_Ceiling.…

36 x 24 inches

91.44 x 60.96 cm

$3500




More items related to: , , ,

6-Tile Mural, Libyan Sibyl from Sistine Chapel

Michelangelo di Lodovico Buonarroti Simoni (1475-1564), universally known simply as Michelangelo, was arguably the greatest artist of all time. His sculpture of David is probably the most famous sculpture in the world and his frescoes on the ceiling of the Sistine Chapel are possibly man’s greatest achievement in the history of painting.

Despite his distaste for painting (he was a sculptor and considered painting to be less serious), he reluctantly accepted the commission of this arduous project from Pope Julius II in 1508. Painted between 1508 and 1512, the Sistine Chapel ceiling features 343 figures within more than 5000 square feet of painted ceiling.

Contrary to popular belief, Michelangelo did not paint the ceiling while laying on his back. Holes were drilled into the walls above the windows in the room from which brackets were placed to support a large flat scaffold on which he stood to paint. Even so, the work was physically demanding and Michelangelo wrote this amusing sonnet describing the results.
I’ve grown a goitre by dwelling in this den–
As cats from stagnant streams in Lombardy,
Or in what other land they hap to be–
Which drives the belly close beneath the chin:

My beard turns up to heaven; my nape falls in,
Fixed on my spine: my breast-bone visibly
Grows like a harp: a rich embroidery
Bedews my face from brush-drops thick and thin.

My loins into my paunch like levers grind:
My buttock like a crupper bears my weight;
My feet unguided wander to and fro;
In front my skin grows loose and long; behind,

By bending it becomes more taut and strait;
Crosswise I strain me like a Syrian bow:
Whence false and quaint, I know,
Must be the fruit of squinting brain and eye;

For ill can aim the gun that bends awry.
Come then, Giovanni, try
To succour my dead pictures and my fame;
Since foul I fare and painting is my shame.

This six-tile mural from the first half of the 20th century, depicts
Michelangelo’s magnificent Libyan Sibyl, Phemonoe, the daughter of Zeus and Poseidon’s daughter, Lamia. Phemonoe foretold the “coming of the day when that which is hidden shall be revealed”.

Each of the 6 tiles are 12″ x 12″, with the full image 36″ x 24″.  1st half, 20th century

I have also added a link to view the full ceiling.
https://upload.wikimedia.org/…/07/CAPPELLA_SISTINA_Ceiling.…

36 x 24 inches

91.44 x 60.96 cm

$3500




More items related to: , , ,

6-Tile Mural, Libyan Sibyl from Sistine Chapel

Michelangelo di Lodovico Buonarroti Simoni (1475-1564), universally known simply as Michelangelo, was arguably the greatest artist of all time. His sculpture of David is probably the most famous sculpture in the world and his frescoes on the ceiling of the Sistine Chapel are possibly man’s greatest achievement in the history of painting.

Despite his distaste for painting (he was a sculptor and considered painting to be less serious), he reluctantly accepted the commission of this arduous project from Pope Julius II in 1508. Painted between 1508 and 1512, the Sistine Chapel ceiling features 343 figures within more than 5000 square feet of painted ceiling.

Contrary to popular belief, Michelangelo did not paint the ceiling while laying on his back. Holes were drilled into the walls above the windows in the room from which brackets were placed to support a large flat scaffold on which he stood to paint. Even so, the work was physically demanding and Michelangelo wrote this amusing sonnet describing the results.
I’ve grown a goitre by dwelling in this den–
As cats from stagnant streams in Lombardy,
Or in what other land they hap to be–
Which drives the belly close beneath the chin:

My beard turns up to heaven; my nape falls in,
Fixed on my spine: my breast-bone visibly
Grows like a harp: a rich embroidery
Bedews my face from brush-drops thick and thin.

My loins into my paunch like levers grind:
My buttock like a crupper bears my weight;
My feet unguided wander to and fro;
In front my skin grows loose and long; behind,

By bending it becomes more taut and strait;
Crosswise I strain me like a Syrian bow:
Whence false and quaint, I know,
Must be the fruit of squinting brain and eye;

For ill can aim the gun that bends awry.
Come then, Giovanni, try
To succour my dead pictures and my fame;
Since foul I fare and painting is my shame.

This six-tile mural from the first half of the 20th century, depicts
Michelangelo’s magnificent Libyan Sibyl, Phemonoe, the daughter of Zeus and Poseidon’s daughter, Lamia. Phemonoe foretold the “coming of the day when that which is hidden shall be revealed”.

Each of the 6 tiles are 12″ x 12″, with the full image 36″ x 24″.  1st half, 20th century

I have also added a link to view the full ceiling.
https://upload.wikimedia.org/…/07/CAPPELLA_SISTINA_Ceiling.…

36 x 24 inches

91.44 x 60.96 cm

$3500




More items related to: , , ,

6-Tile Mural, Libyan Sibyl from Sistine Chapel

Michelangelo di Lodovico Buonarroti Simoni (1475-1564), universally known simply as Michelangelo, was arguably the greatest artist of all time. His sculpture of David is probably the most famous sculpture in the world and his frescoes on the ceiling of the Sistine Chapel are possibly man’s greatest achievement in the history of painting.

Despite his distaste for painting (he was a sculptor and considered painting to be less serious), he reluctantly accepted the commission of this arduous project from Pope Julius II in 1508. Painted between 1508 and 1512, the Sistine Chapel ceiling features 343 figures within more than 5000 square feet of painted ceiling.

Contrary to popular belief, Michelangelo did not paint the ceiling while laying on his back. Holes were drilled into the walls above the windows in the room from which brackets were placed to support a large flat scaffold on which he stood to paint. Even so, the work was physically demanding and Michelangelo wrote this amusing sonnet describing the results.
I’ve grown a goitre by dwelling in this den–
As cats from stagnant streams in Lombardy,
Or in what other land they hap to be–
Which drives the belly close beneath the chin:

My beard turns up to heaven; my nape falls in,
Fixed on my spine: my breast-bone visibly
Grows like a harp: a rich embroidery
Bedews my face from brush-drops thick and thin.

My loins into my paunch like levers grind:
My buttock like a crupper bears my weight;
My feet unguided wander to and fro;
In front my skin grows loose and long; behind,

By bending it becomes more taut and strait;
Crosswise I strain me like a Syrian bow:
Whence false and quaint, I know,
Must be the fruit of squinting brain and eye;

For ill can aim the gun that bends awry.
Come then, Giovanni, try
To succour my dead pictures and my fame;
Since foul I fare and painting is my shame.

This six-tile mural from the first half of the 20th century, depicts
Michelangelo’s magnificent Libyan Sibyl, Phemonoe, the daughter of Zeus and Poseidon’s daughter, Lamia. Phemonoe foretold the “coming of the day when that which is hidden shall be revealed”.

Each of the 6 tiles are 12″ x 12″, with the full image 36″ x 24″.  1st half, 20th century

I have also added a link to view the full ceiling.
https://upload.wikimedia.org/…/07/CAPPELLA_SISTINA_Ceiling.…

36 x 24 inches

91.44 x 60.96 cm

$3500




More items related to: , , ,

6-Tile Mural, Libyan Sibyl from Sistine Chapel

Michelangelo di Lodovico Buonarroti Simoni (1475-1564), universally known simply as Michelangelo, was arguably the greatest artist of all time. His sculpture of David is probably the most famous sculpture in the world and his frescoes on the ceiling of the Sistine Chapel are possibly man’s greatest achievement in the history of painting.

Despite his distaste for painting (he was a sculptor and considered painting to be less serious), he reluctantly accepted the commission of this arduous project from Pope Julius II in 1508. Painted between 1508 and 1512, the Sistine Chapel ceiling features 343 figures within more than 5000 square feet of painted ceiling.

Contrary to popular belief, Michelangelo did not paint the ceiling while laying on his back. Holes were drilled into the walls above the windows in the room from which brackets were placed to support a large flat scaffold on which he stood to paint. Even so, the work was physically demanding and Michelangelo wrote this amusing sonnet describing the results.
I’ve grown a goitre by dwelling in this den–
As cats from stagnant streams in Lombardy,
Or in what other land they hap to be–
Which drives the belly close beneath the chin:

My beard turns up to heaven; my nape falls in,
Fixed on my spine: my breast-bone visibly
Grows like a harp: a rich embroidery
Bedews my face from brush-drops thick and thin.

My loins into my paunch like levers grind:
My buttock like a crupper bears my weight;
My feet unguided wander to and fro;
In front my skin grows loose and long; behind,

By bending it becomes more taut and strait;
Crosswise I strain me like a Syrian bow:
Whence false and quaint, I know,
Must be the fruit of squinting brain and eye;

For ill can aim the gun that bends awry.
Come then, Giovanni, try
To succour my dead pictures and my fame;
Since foul I fare and painting is my shame.

This six-tile mural from the first half of the 20th century, depicts
Michelangelo’s magnificent Libyan Sibyl, Phemonoe, the daughter of Zeus and Poseidon’s daughter, Lamia. Phemonoe foretold the “coming of the day when that which is hidden shall be revealed”.

Each of the 6 tiles are 12″ x 12″, with the full image 36″ x 24″.  1st half, 20th century

I have also added a link to view the full ceiling.
https://upload.wikimedia.org/…/07/CAPPELLA_SISTINA_Ceiling.…

36 x 24 inches

91.44 x 60.96 cm

$3500




More items related to: , , ,

6-Tile Mural, Libyan Sibyl from Sistine Chapel

Michelangelo di Lodovico Buonarroti Simoni (1475-1564), universally known simply as Michelangelo, was arguably the greatest artist of all time. His sculpture of David is probably the most famous sculpture in the world and his frescoes on the ceiling of the Sistine Chapel are possibly man’s greatest achievement in the history of painting.

Despite his distaste for painting (he was a sculptor and considered painting to be less serious), he reluctantly accepted the commission of this arduous project from Pope Julius II in 1508. Painted between 1508 and 1512, the Sistine Chapel ceiling features 343 figures within more than 5000 square feet of painted ceiling.

Contrary to popular belief, Michelangelo did not paint the ceiling while laying on his back. Holes were drilled into the walls above the windows in the room from which brackets were placed to support a large flat scaffold on which he stood to paint. Even so, the work was physically demanding and Michelangelo wrote this amusing sonnet describing the results.
I’ve grown a goitre by dwelling in this den–
As cats from stagnant streams in Lombardy,
Or in what other land they hap to be–
Which drives the belly close beneath the chin:

My beard turns up to heaven; my nape falls in,
Fixed on my spine: my breast-bone visibly
Grows like a harp: a rich embroidery
Bedews my face from brush-drops thick and thin.

My loins into my paunch like levers grind:
My buttock like a crupper bears my weight;
My feet unguided wander to and fro;
In front my skin grows loose and long; behind,

By bending it becomes more taut and strait;
Crosswise I strain me like a Syrian bow:
Whence false and quaint, I know,
Must be the fruit of squinting brain and eye;

For ill can aim the gun that bends awry.
Come then, Giovanni, try
To succour my dead pictures and my fame;
Since foul I fare and painting is my shame.

This six-tile mural from the first half of the 20th century, depicts
Michelangelo’s magnificent Libyan Sibyl, Phemonoe, the daughter of Zeus and Poseidon’s daughter, Lamia. Phemonoe foretold the “coming of the day when that which is hidden shall be revealed”.

Each of the 6 tiles are 12″ x 12″, with the full image 36″ x 24″.  1st half, 20th century

I have also added a link to view the full ceiling.
https://upload.wikimedia.org/…/07/CAPPELLA_SISTINA_Ceiling.…

36 x 24 inches

91.44 x 60.96 cm

$3500




More items related to: , , ,

6-Tile Mural, Libyan Sibyl from Sistine Chapel

Michelangelo di Lodovico Buonarroti Simoni (1475-1564), universally known simply as Michelangelo, was arguably the greatest artist of all time. His sculpture of David is probably the most famous sculpture in the world and his frescoes on the ceiling of the Sistine Chapel are possibly man’s greatest achievement in the history of painting.

Despite his distaste for painting (he was a sculptor and considered painting to be less serious), he reluctantly accepted the commission of this arduous project from Pope Julius II in 1508. Painted between 1508 and 1512, the Sistine Chapel ceiling features 343 figures within more than 5000 square feet of painted ceiling.

Contrary to popular belief, Michelangelo did not paint the ceiling while laying on his back. Holes were drilled into the walls above the windows in the room from which brackets were placed to support a large flat scaffold on which he stood to paint. Even so, the work was physically demanding and Michelangelo wrote this amusing sonnet describing the results.
I’ve grown a goitre by dwelling in this den–
As cats from stagnant streams in Lombardy,
Or in what other land they hap to be–
Which drives the belly close beneath the chin:

My beard turns up to heaven; my nape falls in,
Fixed on my spine: my breast-bone visibly
Grows like a harp: a rich embroidery
Bedews my face from brush-drops thick and thin.

My loins into my paunch like levers grind:
My buttock like a crupper bears my weight;
My feet unguided wander to and fro;
In front my skin grows loose and long; behind,

By bending it becomes more taut and strait;
Crosswise I strain me like a Syrian bow:
Whence false and quaint, I know,
Must be the fruit of squinting brain and eye;

For ill can aim the gun that bends awry.
Come then, Giovanni, try
To succour my dead pictures and my fame;
Since foul I fare and painting is my shame.

This six-tile mural from the first half of the 20th century, depicts
Michelangelo’s magnificent Libyan Sibyl, Phemonoe, the daughter of Zeus and Poseidon’s daughter, Lamia. Phemonoe foretold the “coming of the day when that which is hidden shall be revealed”.

Each of the 6 tiles are 12″ x 12″, with the full image 36″ x 24″.  1st half, 20th century

I have also added a link to view the full ceiling.
https://upload.wikimedia.org/…/07/CAPPELLA_SISTINA_Ceiling.…

36 x 24 inches

91.44 x 60.96 cm

$3500




More items related to: , , ,

6-Tile Mural, Libyan Sibyl from Sistine Chapel

Michelangelo di Lodovico Buonarroti Simoni (1475-1564), universally known simply as Michelangelo, was arguably the greatest artist of all time. His sculpture of David is probably the most famous sculpture in the world and his frescoes on the ceiling of the Sistine Chapel are possibly man’s greatest achievement in the history of painting.

Despite his distaste for painting (he was a sculptor and considered painting to be less serious), he reluctantly accepted the commission of this arduous project from Pope Julius II in 1508. Painted between 1508 and 1512, the Sistine Chapel ceiling features 343 figures within more than 5000 square feet of painted ceiling.

Contrary to popular belief, Michelangelo did not paint the ceiling while laying on his back. Holes were drilled into the walls above the windows in the room from which brackets were placed to support a large flat scaffold on which he stood to paint. Even so, the work was physically demanding and Michelangelo wrote this amusing sonnet describing the results.
I’ve grown a goitre by dwelling in this den–
As cats from stagnant streams in Lombardy,
Or in what other land they hap to be–
Which drives the belly close beneath the chin:

My beard turns up to heaven; my nape falls in,
Fixed on my spine: my breast-bone visibly
Grows like a harp: a rich embroidery
Bedews my face from brush-drops thick and thin.

My loins into my paunch like levers grind:
My buttock like a crupper bears my weight;
My feet unguided wander to and fro;
In front my skin grows loose and long; behind,

By bending it becomes more taut and strait;
Crosswise I strain me like a Syrian bow:
Whence false and quaint, I know,
Must be the fruit of squinting brain and eye;

For ill can aim the gun that bends awry.
Come then, Giovanni, try
To succour my dead pictures and my fame;
Since foul I fare and painting is my shame.

This six-tile mural from the first half of the 20th century, depicts
Michelangelo’s magnificent Libyan Sibyl, Phemonoe, the daughter of Zeus and Poseidon’s daughter, Lamia. Phemonoe foretold the “coming of the day when that which is hidden shall be revealed”.

Each of the 6 tiles are 12″ x 12″, with the full image 36″ x 24″.  1st half, 20th century

I have also added a link to view the full ceiling.
https://upload.wikimedia.org/…/07/CAPPELLA_SISTINA_Ceiling.…

36 x 24 inches

91.44 x 60.96 cm

$3500




More items related to: , , ,

6-Tile Mural, Libyan Sibyl from Sistine Chapel

Michelangelo di Lodovico Buonarroti Simoni (1475-1564), universally known simply as Michelangelo, was arguably the greatest artist of all time. His sculpture of David is probably the most famous sculpture in the world and his frescoes on the ceiling of the Sistine Chapel are possibly man’s greatest achievement in the history of painting.

Despite his distaste for painting (he was a sculptor and considered painting to be less serious), he reluctantly accepted the commission of this arduous project from Pope Julius II in 1508. Painted between 1508 and 1512, the Sistine Chapel ceiling features 343 figures within more than 5000 square feet of painted ceiling.

Contrary to popular belief, Michelangelo did not paint the ceiling while laying on his back. Holes were drilled into the walls above the windows in the room from which brackets were placed to support a large flat scaffold on which he stood to paint. Even so, the work was physically demanding and Michelangelo wrote this amusing sonnet describing the results.
I’ve grown a goitre by dwelling in this den–
As cats from stagnant streams in Lombardy,
Or in what other land they hap to be–
Which drives the belly close beneath the chin:

My beard turns up to heaven; my nape falls in,
Fixed on my spine: my breast-bone visibly
Grows like a harp: a rich embroidery
Bedews my face from brush-drops thick and thin.

My loins into my paunch like levers grind:
My buttock like a crupper bears my weight;
My feet unguided wander to and fro;
In front my skin grows loose and long; behind,

By bending it becomes more taut and strait;
Crosswise I strain me like a Syrian bow:
Whence false and quaint, I know,
Must be the fruit of squinting brain and eye;

For ill can aim the gun that bends awry.
Come then, Giovanni, try
To succour my dead pictures and my fame;
Since foul I fare and painting is my shame.

This six-tile mural from the first half of the 20th century, depicts
Michelangelo’s magnificent Libyan Sibyl, Phemonoe, the daughter of Zeus and Poseidon’s daughter, Lamia. Phemonoe foretold the “coming of the day when that which is hidden shall be revealed”.

Each of the 6 tiles are 12″ x 12″, with the full image 36″ x 24″.  1st half, 20th century

I have also added a link to view the full ceiling.
https://upload.wikimedia.org/…/07/CAPPELLA_SISTINA_Ceiling.…

36 x 24 inches

91.44 x 60.96 cm

$3500




More items related to: , , ,

6-Tile Mural, Libyan Sibyl from Sistine Chapel

Michelangelo di Lodovico Buonarroti Simoni (1475-1564), universally known simply as Michelangelo, was arguably the greatest artist of all time. His sculpture of David is probably the most famous sculpture in the world and his frescoes on the ceiling of the Sistine Chapel are possibly man’s greatest achievement in the history of painting.

Despite his distaste for painting (he was a sculptor and considered painting to be less serious), he reluctantly accepted the commission of this arduous project from Pope Julius II in 1508. Painted between 1508 and 1512, the Sistine Chapel ceiling features 343 figures within more than 5000 square feet of painted ceiling.

Contrary to popular belief, Michelangelo did not paint the ceiling while laying on his back. Holes were drilled into the walls above the windows in the room from which brackets were placed to support a large flat scaffold on which he stood to paint. Even so, the work was physically demanding and Michelangelo wrote this amusing sonnet describing the results.
I’ve grown a goitre by dwelling in this den–
As cats from stagnant streams in Lombardy,
Or in what other land they hap to be–
Which drives the belly close beneath the chin:

My beard turns up to heaven; my nape falls in,
Fixed on my spine: my breast-bone visibly
Grows like a harp: a rich embroidery
Bedews my face from brush-drops thick and thin.

My loins into my paunch like levers grind:
My buttock like a crupper bears my weight;
My feet unguided wander to and fro;
In front my skin grows loose and long; behind,

By bending it becomes more taut and strait;
Crosswise I strain me like a Syrian bow:
Whence false and quaint, I know,
Must be the fruit of squinting brain and eye;

For ill can aim the gun that bends awry.
Come then, Giovanni, try
To succour my dead pictures and my fame;
Since foul I fare and painting is my shame.

This six-tile mural from the first half of the 20th century, depicts
Michelangelo’s magnificent Libyan Sibyl, Phemonoe, the daughter of Zeus and Poseidon’s daughter, Lamia. Phemonoe foretold the “coming of the day when that which is hidden shall be revealed”.

Each of the 6 tiles are 12″ x 12″, with the full image 36″ x 24″.  1st half, 20th century

I have also added a link to view the full ceiling.
https://upload.wikimedia.org/…/07/CAPPELLA_SISTINA_Ceiling.…

36 x 24 inches

91.44 x 60.96 cm

$3500




More items related to: , , ,

6-Tile Mural, Libyan Sibyl from Sistine Chapel

Michelangelo di Lodovico Buonarroti Simoni (1475-1564), universally known simply as Michelangelo, was arguably the greatest artist of all time. His sculpture of David is probably the most famous sculpture in the world and his frescoes on the ceiling of the Sistine Chapel are possibly man’s greatest achievement in the history of painting.

Despite his distaste for painting (he was a sculptor and considered painting to be less serious), he reluctantly accepted the commission of this arduous project from Pope Julius II in 1508. Painted between 1508 and 1512, the Sistine Chapel ceiling features 343 figures within more than 5000 square feet of painted ceiling.

Contrary to popular belief, Michelangelo did not paint the ceiling while laying on his back. Holes were drilled into the walls above the windows in the room from which brackets were placed to support a large flat scaffold on which he stood to paint. Even so, the work was physically demanding and Michelangelo wrote this amusing sonnet describing the results.
I’ve grown a goitre by dwelling in this den–
As cats from stagnant streams in Lombardy,
Or in what other land they hap to be–
Which drives the belly close beneath the chin:

My beard turns up to heaven; my nape falls in,
Fixed on my spine: my breast-bone visibly
Grows like a harp: a rich embroidery
Bedews my face from brush-drops thick and thin.

My loins into my paunch like levers grind:
My buttock like a crupper bears my weight;
My feet unguided wander to and fro;
In front my skin grows loose and long; behind,

By bending it becomes more taut and strait;
Crosswise I strain me like a Syrian bow:
Whence false and quaint, I know,
Must be the fruit of squinting brain and eye;

For ill can aim the gun that bends awry.
Come then, Giovanni, try
To succour my dead pictures and my fame;
Since foul I fare and painting is my shame.

This six-tile mural from the first half of the 20th century, depicts
Michelangelo’s magnificent Libyan Sibyl, Phemonoe, the daughter of Zeus and Poseidon’s daughter, Lamia. Phemonoe foretold the “coming of the day when that which is hidden shall be revealed”.

Each of the 6 tiles are 12″ x 12″, with the full image 36″ x 24″.  1st half, 20th century

I have also added a link to view the full ceiling.
https://upload.wikimedia.org/…/07/CAPPELLA_SISTINA_Ceiling.…

36 x 24 inches

91.44 x 60.96 cm

$3500




More items related to: , , ,

6-Tile Mural, Libyan Sibyl from Sistine Chapel

Michelangelo di Lodovico Buonarroti Simoni (1475-1564), universally known simply as Michelangelo, was arguably the greatest artist of all time. His sculpture of David is probably the most famous sculpture in the world and his frescoes on the ceiling of the Sistine Chapel are possibly man’s greatest achievement in the history of painting.

Despite his distaste for painting (he was a sculptor and considered painting to be less serious), he reluctantly accepted the commission of this arduous project from Pope Julius II in 1508. Painted between 1508 and 1512, the Sistine Chapel ceiling features 343 figures within more than 5000 square feet of painted ceiling.

Contrary to popular belief, Michelangelo did not paint the ceiling while laying on his back. Holes were drilled into the walls above the windows in the room from which brackets were placed to support a large flat scaffold on which he stood to paint. Even so, the work was physically demanding and Michelangelo wrote this amusing sonnet describing the results.
I’ve grown a goitre by dwelling in this den–
As cats from stagnant streams in Lombardy,
Or in what other land they hap to be–
Which drives the belly close beneath the chin:

My beard turns up to heaven; my nape falls in,
Fixed on my spine: my breast-bone visibly
Grows like a harp: a rich embroidery
Bedews my face from brush-drops thick and thin.

My loins into my paunch like levers grind:
My buttock like a crupper bears my weight;
My feet unguided wander to and fro;
In front my skin grows loose and long; behind,

By bending it becomes more taut and strait;
Crosswise I strain me like a Syrian bow:
Whence false and quaint, I know,
Must be the fruit of squinting brain and eye;

For ill can aim the gun that bends awry.
Come then, Giovanni, try
To succour my dead pictures and my fame;
Since foul I fare and painting is my shame.

This six-tile mural from the first half of the 20th century, depicts
Michelangelo’s magnificent Libyan Sibyl, Phemonoe, the daughter of Zeus and Poseidon’s daughter, Lamia. Phemonoe foretold the “coming of the day when that which is hidden shall be revealed”.

Each of the 6 tiles are 12″ x 12″, with the full image 36″ x 24″.  1st half, 20th century

I have also added a link to view the full ceiling.
https://upload.wikimedia.org/…/07/CAPPELLA_SISTINA_Ceiling.…

36 x 24 inches

91.44 x 60.96 cm

$3500




More items related to: , , ,

6-Tile Mural, Libyan Sibyl from Sistine Chapel

Michelangelo di Lodovico Buonarroti Simoni (1475-1564), universally known simply as Michelangelo, was arguably the greatest artist of all time. His sculpture of David is probably the most famous sculpture in the world and his frescoes on the ceiling of the Sistine Chapel are possibly man’s greatest achievement in the history of painting.

Despite his distaste for painting (he was a sculptor and considered painting to be less serious), he reluctantly accepted the commission of this arduous project from Pope Julius II in 1508. Painted between 1508 and 1512, the Sistine Chapel ceiling features 343 figures within more than 5000 square feet of painted ceiling.

Contrary to popular belief, Michelangelo did not paint the ceiling while laying on his back. Holes were drilled into the walls above the windows in the room from which brackets were placed to support a large flat scaffold on which he stood to paint. Even so, the work was physically demanding and Michelangelo wrote this amusing sonnet describing the results.
I’ve grown a goitre by dwelling in this den–
As cats from stagnant streams in Lombardy,
Or in what other land they hap to be–
Which drives the belly close beneath the chin:

My beard turns up to heaven; my nape falls in,
Fixed on my spine: my breast-bone visibly
Grows like a harp: a rich embroidery
Bedews my face from brush-drops thick and thin.

My loins into my paunch like levers grind:
My buttock like a crupper bears my weight;
My feet unguided wander to and fro;
In front my skin grows loose and long; behind,

By bending it becomes more taut and strait;
Crosswise I strain me like a Syrian bow:
Whence false and quaint, I know,
Must be the fruit of squinting brain and eye;

For ill can aim the gun that bends awry.
Come then, Giovanni, try
To succour my dead pictures and my fame;
Since foul I fare and painting is my shame.

This six-tile mural from the first half of the 20th century, depicts
Michelangelo’s magnificent Libyan Sibyl, Phemonoe, the daughter of Zeus and Poseidon’s daughter, Lamia. Phemonoe foretold the “coming of the day when that which is hidden shall be revealed”.

Each of the 6 tiles are 12″ x 12″, with the full image 36″ x 24″.  1st half, 20th century

I have also added a link to view the full ceiling.
https://upload.wikimedia.org/…/07/CAPPELLA_SISTINA_Ceiling.…

36 x 24 inches

91.44 x 60.96 cm

$3500




More items related to: , , ,

6-Tile Mural, Libyan Sibyl from Sistine Chapel

Michelangelo di Lodovico Buonarroti Simoni (1475-1564), universally known simply as Michelangelo, was arguably the greatest artist of all time. His sculpture of David is probably the most famous sculpture in the world and his frescoes on the ceiling of the Sistine Chapel are possibly man’s greatest achievement in the history of painting.

Despite his distaste for painting (he was a sculptor and considered painting to be less serious), he reluctantly accepted the commission of this arduous project from Pope Julius II in 1508. Painted between 1508 and 1512, the Sistine Chapel ceiling features 343 figures within more than 5000 square feet of painted ceiling.

Contrary to popular belief, Michelangelo did not paint the ceiling while laying on his back. Holes were drilled into the walls above the windows in the room from which brackets were placed to support a large flat scaffold on which he stood to paint. Even so, the work was physically demanding and Michelangelo wrote this amusing sonnet describing the results.
I’ve grown a goitre by dwelling in this den–
As cats from stagnant streams in Lombardy,
Or in what other land they hap to be–
Which drives the belly close beneath the chin:

My beard turns up to heaven; my nape falls in,
Fixed on my spine: my breast-bone visibly
Grows like a harp: a rich embroidery
Bedews my face from brush-drops thick and thin.

My loins into my paunch like levers grind:
My buttock like a crupper bears my weight;
My feet unguided wander to and fro;
In front my skin grows loose and long; behind,

By bending it becomes more taut and strait;
Crosswise I strain me like a Syrian bow:
Whence false and quaint, I know,
Must be the fruit of squinting brain and eye;

For ill can aim the gun that bends awry.
Come then, Giovanni, try
To succour my dead pictures and my fame;
Since foul I fare and painting is my shame.

This six-tile mural from the first half of the 20th century, depicts
Michelangelo’s magnificent Libyan Sibyl, Phemonoe, the daughter of Zeus and Poseidon’s daughter, Lamia. Phemonoe foretold the “coming of the day when that which is hidden shall be revealed”.

Each of the 6 tiles are 12″ x 12″, with the full image 36″ x 24″.  1st half, 20th century

I have also added a link to view the full ceiling.
https://upload.wikimedia.org/…/07/CAPPELLA_SISTINA_Ceiling.…

36 x 24 inches

91.44 x 60.96 cm

$3500




More items related to: , , ,

6-Tile Mural, Libyan Sibyl from Sistine Chapel

Michelangelo di Lodovico Buonarroti Simoni (1475-1564), universally known simply as Michelangelo, was arguably the greatest artist of all time. His sculpture of David is probably the most famous sculpture in the world and his frescoes on the ceiling of the Sistine Chapel are possibly man’s greatest achievement in the history of painting.

Despite his distaste for painting (he was a sculptor and considered painting to be less serious), he reluctantly accepted the commission of this arduous project from Pope Julius II in 1508. Painted between 1508 and 1512, the Sistine Chapel ceiling features 343 figures within more than 5000 square feet of painted ceiling.

Contrary to popular belief, Michelangelo did not paint the ceiling while laying on his back. Holes were drilled into the walls above the windows in the room from which brackets were placed to support a large flat scaffold on which he stood to paint. Even so, the work was physically demanding and Michelangelo wrote this amusing sonnet describing the results.
I’ve grown a goitre by dwelling in this den–
As cats from stagnant streams in Lombardy,
Or in what other land they hap to be–
Which drives the belly close beneath the chin:

My beard turns up to heaven; my nape falls in,
Fixed on my spine: my breast-bone visibly
Grows like a harp: a rich embroidery
Bedews my face from brush-drops thick and thin.

My loins into my paunch like levers grind:
My buttock like a crupper bears my weight;
My feet unguided wander to and fro;
In front my skin grows loose and long; behind,

By bending it becomes more taut and strait;
Crosswise I strain me like a Syrian bow:
Whence false and quaint, I know,
Must be the fruit of squinting brain and eye;

For ill can aim the gun that bends awry.
Come then, Giovanni, try
To succour my dead pictures and my fame;
Since foul I fare and painting is my shame.

This six-tile mural from the first half of the 20th century, depicts
Michelangelo’s magnificent Libyan Sibyl, Phemonoe, the daughter of Zeus and Poseidon’s daughter, Lamia. Phemonoe foretold the “coming of the day when that which is hidden shall be revealed”.

Each of the 6 tiles are 12″ x 12″, with the full image 36″ x 24″.  1st half, 20th century

I have also added a link to view the full ceiling.
https://upload.wikimedia.org/…/07/CAPPELLA_SISTINA_Ceiling.…

36 x 24 inches

91.44 x 60.96 cm

$3500




More items related to: , , ,

6-Tile Mural, Libyan Sibyl from Sistine Chapel

Michelangelo di Lodovico Buonarroti Simoni (1475-1564), universally known simply as Michelangelo, was arguably the greatest artist of all time. His sculpture of David is probably the most famous sculpture in the world and his frescoes on the ceiling of the Sistine Chapel are possibly man’s greatest achievement in the history of painting.

Despite his distaste for painting (he was a sculptor and considered painting to be less serious), he reluctantly accepted the commission of this arduous project from Pope Julius II in 1508. Painted between 1508 and 1512, the Sistine Chapel ceiling features 343 figures within more than 5000 square feet of painted ceiling.

Contrary to popular belief, Michelangelo did not paint the ceiling while laying on his back. Holes were drilled into the walls above the windows in the room from which brackets were placed to support a large flat scaffold on which he stood to paint. Even so, the work was physically demanding and Michelangelo wrote this amusing sonnet describing the results.
I’ve grown a goitre by dwelling in this den–
As cats from stagnant streams in Lombardy,
Or in what other land they hap to be–
Which drives the belly close beneath the chin:

My beard turns up to heaven; my nape falls in,
Fixed on my spine: my breast-bone visibly
Grows like a harp: a rich embroidery
Bedews my face from brush-drops thick and thin.

My loins into my paunch like levers grind:
My buttock like a crupper bears my weight;
My feet unguided wander to and fro;
In front my skin grows loose and long; behind,

By bending it becomes more taut and strait;
Crosswise I strain me like a Syrian bow:
Whence false and quaint, I know,
Must be the fruit of squinting brain and eye;

For ill can aim the gun that bends awry.
Come then, Giovanni, try
To succour my dead pictures and my fame;
Since foul I fare and painting is my shame.

This six-tile mural from the first half of the 20th century, depicts
Michelangelo’s magnificent Libyan Sibyl, Phemonoe, the daughter of Zeus and Poseidon’s daughter, Lamia. Phemonoe foretold the “coming of the day when that which is hidden shall be revealed”.

Each of the 6 tiles are 12″ x 12″, with the full image 36″ x 24″.  1st half, 20th century

I have also added a link to view the full ceiling.
https://upload.wikimedia.org/…/07/CAPPELLA_SISTINA_Ceiling.…

36 x 24 inches

91.44 x 60.96 cm

$3500




More items related to: , , ,

6-Tile Mural, Libyan Sibyl from Sistine Chapel

Michelangelo di Lodovico Buonarroti Simoni (1475-1564), universally known simply as Michelangelo, was arguably the greatest artist of all time. His sculpture of David is probably the most famous sculpture in the world and his frescoes on the ceiling of the Sistine Chapel are possibly man’s greatest achievement in the history of painting.

Despite his distaste for painting (he was a sculptor and considered painting to be less serious), he reluctantly accepted the commission of this arduous project from Pope Julius II in 1508. Painted between 1508 and 1512, the Sistine Chapel ceiling features 343 figures within more than 5000 square feet of painted ceiling.

Contrary to popular belief, Michelangelo did not paint the ceiling while laying on his back. Holes were drilled into the walls above the windows in the room from which brackets were placed to support a large flat scaffold on which he stood to paint. Even so, the work was physically demanding and Michelangelo wrote this amusing sonnet describing the results.
I’ve grown a goitre by dwelling in this den–
As cats from stagnant streams in Lombardy,
Or in what other land they hap to be–
Which drives the belly close beneath the chin:

My beard turns up to heaven; my nape falls in,
Fixed on my spine: my breast-bone visibly
Grows like a harp: a rich embroidery
Bedews my face from brush-drops thick and thin.

My loins into my paunch like levers grind:
My buttock like a crupper bears my weight;
My feet unguided wander to and fro;
In front my skin grows loose and long; behind,

By bending it becomes more taut and strait;
Crosswise I strain me like a Syrian bow:
Whence false and quaint, I know,
Must be the fruit of squinting brain and eye;

For ill can aim the gun that bends awry.
Come then, Giovanni, try
To succour my dead pictures and my fame;
Since foul I fare and painting is my shame.

This six-tile mural from the first half of the 20th century, depicts
Michelangelo’s magnificent Libyan Sibyl, Phemonoe, the daughter of Zeus and Poseidon’s daughter, Lamia. Phemonoe foretold the “coming of the day when that which is hidden shall be revealed”.

Each of the 6 tiles are 12″ x 12″, with the full image 36″ x 24″.  1st half, 20th century

I have also added a link to view the full ceiling.
https://upload.wikimedia.org/…/07/CAPPELLA_SISTINA_Ceiling.…

36 x 24 inches

91.44 x 60.96 cm

$3500




More items related to: , , ,

6-Tile Mural, Libyan Sibyl from Sistine Chapel

Michelangelo di Lodovico Buonarroti Simoni (1475-1564), universally known simply as Michelangelo, was arguably the greatest artist of all time. His sculpture of David is probably the most famous sculpture in the world and his frescoes on the ceiling of the Sistine Chapel are possibly man’s greatest achievement in the history of painting.

Despite his distaste for painting (he was a sculptor and considered painting to be less serious), he reluctantly accepted the commission of this arduous project from Pope Julius II in 1508. Painted between 1508 and 1512, the Sistine Chapel ceiling features 343 figures within more than 5000 square feet of painted ceiling.

Contrary to popular belief, Michelangelo did not paint the ceiling while laying on his back. Holes were drilled into the walls above the windows in the room from which brackets were placed to support a large flat scaffold on which he stood to paint. Even so, the work was physically demanding and Michelangelo wrote this amusing sonnet describing the results.
I’ve grown a goitre by dwelling in this den–
As cats from stagnant streams in Lombardy,
Or in what other land they hap to be–
Which drives the belly close beneath the chin:

My beard turns up to heaven; my nape falls in,
Fixed on my spine: my breast-bone visibly
Grows like a harp: a rich embroidery
Bedews my face from brush-drops thick and thin.

My loins into my paunch like levers grind:
My buttock like a crupper bears my weight;
My feet unguided wander to and fro;
In front my skin grows loose and long; behind,

By bending it becomes more taut and strait;
Crosswise I strain me like a Syrian bow:
Whence false and quaint, I know,
Must be the fruit of squinting brain and eye;

For ill can aim the gun that bends awry.
Come then, Giovanni, try
To succour my dead pictures and my fame;
Since foul I fare and painting is my shame.

This six-tile mural from the first half of the 20th century, depicts
Michelangelo’s magnificent Libyan Sibyl, Phemonoe, the daughter of Zeus and Poseidon’s daughter, Lamia. Phemonoe foretold the “coming of the day when that which is hidden shall be revealed”.

Each of the 6 tiles are 12″ x 12″, with the full image 36″ x 24″.  1st half, 20th century

I have also added a link to view the full ceiling.
https://upload.wikimedia.org/…/07/CAPPELLA_SISTINA_Ceiling.…

36 x 24 inches

91.44 x 60.96 cm

$3500




More items related to: , , ,

6-Tile Mural, Libyan Sibyl from Sistine Chapel

Michelangelo di Lodovico Buonarroti Simoni (1475-1564), universally known simply as Michelangelo, was arguably the greatest artist of all time. His sculpture of David is probably the most famous sculpture in the world and his frescoes on the ceiling of the Sistine Chapel are possibly man’s greatest achievement in the history of painting.

Despite his distaste for painting (he was a sculptor and considered painting to be less serious), he reluctantly accepted the commission of this arduous project from Pope Julius II in 1508. Painted between 1508 and 1512, the Sistine Chapel ceiling features 343 figures within more than 5000 square feet of painted ceiling.

Contrary to popular belief, Michelangelo did not paint the ceiling while laying on his back. Holes were drilled into the walls above the windows in the room from which brackets were placed to support a large flat scaffold on which he stood to paint. Even so, the work was physically demanding and Michelangelo wrote this amusing sonnet describing the results.
I’ve grown a goitre by dwelling in this den–
As cats from stagnant streams in Lombardy,
Or in what other land they hap to be–
Which drives the belly close beneath the chin:

My beard turns up to heaven; my nape falls in,
Fixed on my spine: my breast-bone visibly
Grows like a harp: a rich embroidery
Bedews my face from brush-drops thick and thin.

My loins into my paunch like levers grind:
My buttock like a crupper bears my weight;
My feet unguided wander to and fro;
In front my skin grows loose and long; behind,

By bending it becomes more taut and strait;
Crosswise I strain me like a Syrian bow:
Whence false and quaint, I know,
Must be the fruit of squinting brain and eye;

For ill can aim the gun that bends awry.
Come then, Giovanni, try
To succour my dead pictures and my fame;
Since foul I fare and painting is my shame.

This six-tile mural from the first half of the 20th century, depicts
Michelangelo’s magnificent Libyan Sibyl, Phemonoe, the daughter of Zeus and Poseidon’s daughter, Lamia. Phemonoe foretold the “coming of the day when that which is hidden shall be revealed”.

Each of the 6 tiles are 12″ x 12″, with the full image 36″ x 24″.  1st half, 20th century

I have also added a link to view the full ceiling.
https://upload.wikimedia.org/…/07/CAPPELLA_SISTINA_Ceiling.…

36 x 24 inches

91.44 x 60.96 cm

$3500




More items related to: , , ,

6-Tile Mural, Libyan Sibyl from Sistine Chapel

Michelangelo di Lodovico Buonarroti Simoni (1475-1564), universally known simply as Michelangelo, was arguably the greatest artist of all time. His sculpture of David is probably the most famous sculpture in the world and his frescoes on the ceiling of the Sistine Chapel are possibly man’s greatest achievement in the history of painting.

Despite his distaste for painting (he was a sculptor and considered painting to be less serious), he reluctantly accepted the commission of this arduous project from Pope Julius II in 1508. Painted between 1508 and 1512, the Sistine Chapel ceiling features 343 figures within more than 5000 square feet of painted ceiling.

Contrary to popular belief, Michelangelo did not paint the ceiling while laying on his back. Holes were drilled into the walls above the windows in the room from which brackets were placed to support a large flat scaffold on which he stood to paint. Even so, the work was physically demanding and Michelangelo wrote this amusing sonnet describing the results.
I’ve grown a goitre by dwelling in this den–
As cats from stagnant streams in Lombardy,
Or in what other land they hap to be–
Which drives the belly close beneath the chin:

My beard turns up to heaven; my nape falls in,
Fixed on my spine: my breast-bone visibly
Grows like a harp: a rich embroidery
Bedews my face from brush-drops thick and thin.

My loins into my paunch like levers grind:
My buttock like a crupper bears my weight;
My feet unguided wander to and fro;
In front my skin grows loose and long; behind,

By bending it becomes more taut and strait;
Crosswise I strain me like a Syrian bow:
Whence false and quaint, I know,
Must be the fruit of squinting brain and eye;

For ill can aim the gun that bends awry.
Come then, Giovanni, try
To succour my dead pictures and my fame;
Since foul I fare and painting is my shame.

This six-tile mural from the first half of the 20th century, depicts
Michelangelo’s magnificent Libyan Sibyl, Phemonoe, the daughter of Zeus and Poseidon’s daughter, Lamia. Phemonoe foretold the “coming of the day when that which is hidden shall be revealed”.

Each of the 6 tiles are 12″ x 12″, with the full image 36″ x 24″.  1st half, 20th century

I have also added a link to view the full ceiling.
https://upload.wikimedia.org/…/07/CAPPELLA_SISTINA_Ceiling.…

36 x 24 inches

91.44 x 60.96 cm

$3500




More items related to: , , ,

6-Tile Mural, Libyan Sibyl from Sistine Chapel

Michelangelo di Lodovico Buonarroti Simoni (1475-1564), universally known simply as Michelangelo, was arguably the greatest artist of all time. His sculpture of David is probably the most famous sculpture in the world and his frescoes on the ceiling of the Sistine Chapel are possibly man’s greatest achievement in the history of painting.

Despite his distaste for painting (he was a sculptor and considered painting to be less serious), he reluctantly accepted the commission of this arduous project from Pope Julius II in 1508. Painted between 1508 and 1512, the Sistine Chapel ceiling features 343 figures within more than 5000 square feet of painted ceiling.

Contrary to popular belief, Michelangelo did not paint the ceiling while laying on his back. Holes were drilled into the walls above the windows in the room from which brackets were placed to support a large flat scaffold on which he stood to paint. Even so, the work was physically demanding and Michelangelo wrote this amusing sonnet describing the results.
I’ve grown a goitre by dwelling in this den–
As cats from stagnant streams in Lombardy,
Or in what other land they hap to be–
Which drives the belly close beneath the chin:

My beard turns up to heaven; my nape falls in,
Fixed on my spine: my breast-bone visibly
Grows like a harp: a rich embroidery
Bedews my face from brush-drops thick and thin.

My loins into my paunch like levers grind:
My buttock like a crupper bears my weight;
My feet unguided wander to and fro;
In front my skin grows loose and long; behind,

By bending it becomes more taut and strait;
Crosswise I strain me like a Syrian bow:
Whence false and quaint, I know,
Must be the fruit of squinting brain and eye;

For ill can aim the gun that bends awry.
Come then, Giovanni, try
To succour my dead pictures and my fame;
Since foul I fare and painting is my shame.

This six-tile mural from the first half of the 20th century, depicts
Michelangelo’s magnificent Libyan Sibyl, Phemonoe, the daughter of Zeus and Poseidon’s daughter, Lamia. Phemonoe foretold the “coming of the day when that which is hidden shall be revealed”.

Each of the 6 tiles are 12″ x 12″, with the full image 36″ x 24″.  1st half, 20th century

I have also added a link to view the full ceiling.
https://upload.wikimedia.org/…/07/CAPPELLA_SISTINA_Ceiling.…

36 x 24 inches

91.44 x 60.96 cm

$3500




More items related to: , , ,

6-Tile Mural, Libyan Sibyl from Sistine Chapel

Michelangelo di Lodovico Buonarroti Simoni (1475-1564), universally known simply as Michelangelo, was arguably the greatest artist of all time. His sculpture of David is probably the most famous sculpture in the world and his frescoes on the ceiling of the Sistine Chapel are possibly man’s greatest achievement in the history of painting.

Despite his distaste for painting (he was a sculptor and considered painting to be less serious), he reluctantly accepted the commission of this arduous project from Pope Julius II in 1508. Painted between 1508 and 1512, the Sistine Chapel ceiling features 343 figures within more than 5000 square feet of painted ceiling.

Contrary to popular belief, Michelangelo did not paint the ceiling while laying on his back. Holes were drilled into the walls above the windows in the room from which brackets were placed to support a large flat scaffold on which he stood to paint. Even so, the work was physically demanding and Michelangelo wrote this amusing sonnet describing the results.
I’ve grown a goitre by dwelling in this den–
As cats from stagnant streams in Lombardy,
Or in what other land they hap to be–
Which drives the belly close beneath the chin:

My beard turns up to heaven; my nape falls in,
Fixed on my spine: my breast-bone visibly
Grows like a harp: a rich embroidery
Bedews my face from brush-drops thick and thin.

My loins into my paunch like levers grind:
My buttock like a crupper bears my weight;
My feet unguided wander to and fro;
In front my skin grows loose and long; behind,

By bending it becomes more taut and strait;
Crosswise I strain me like a Syrian bow:
Whence false and quaint, I know,
Must be the fruit of squinting brain and eye;

For ill can aim the gun that bends awry.
Come then, Giovanni, try
To succour my dead pictures and my fame;
Since foul I fare and painting is my shame.

This six-tile mural from the first half of the 20th century, depicts
Michelangelo’s magnificent Libyan Sibyl, Phemonoe, the daughter of Zeus and Poseidon’s daughter, Lamia. Phemonoe foretold the “coming of the day when that which is hidden shall be revealed”.

Each of the 6 tiles are 12″ x 12″, with the full image 36″ x 24″.  1st half, 20th century

I have also added a link to view the full ceiling.
https://upload.wikimedia.org/…/07/CAPPELLA_SISTINA_Ceiling.…

36 x 24 inches

91.44 x 60.96 cm

$3500




More items related to: , , ,

6-Tile Mural, Libyan Sibyl from Sistine Chapel

Michelangelo di Lodovico Buonarroti Simoni (1475-1564), universally known simply as Michelangelo, was arguably the greatest artist of all time. His sculpture of David is probably the most famous sculpture in the world and his frescoes on the ceiling of the Sistine Chapel are possibly man’s greatest achievement in the history of painting.

Despite his distaste for painting (he was a sculptor and considered painting to be less serious), he reluctantly accepted the commission of this arduous project from Pope Julius II in 1508. Painted between 1508 and 1512, the Sistine Chapel ceiling features 343 figures within more than 5000 square feet of painted ceiling.

Contrary to popular belief, Michelangelo did not paint the ceiling while laying on his back. Holes were drilled into the walls above the windows in the room from which brackets were placed to support a large flat scaffold on which he stood to paint. Even so, the work was physically demanding and Michelangelo wrote this amusing sonnet describing the results.
I’ve grown a goitre by dwelling in this den–
As cats from stagnant streams in Lombardy,
Or in what other land they hap to be–
Which drives the belly close beneath the chin:

My beard turns up to heaven; my nape falls in,
Fixed on my spine: my breast-bone visibly
Grows like a harp: a rich embroidery
Bedews my face from brush-drops thick and thin.

My loins into my paunch like levers grind:
My buttock like a crupper bears my weight;
My feet unguided wander to and fro;
In front my skin grows loose and long; behind,

By bending it becomes more taut and strait;
Crosswise I strain me like a Syrian bow:
Whence false and quaint, I know,
Must be the fruit of squinting brain and eye;

For ill can aim the gun that bends awry.
Come then, Giovanni, try
To succour my dead pictures and my fame;
Since foul I fare and painting is my shame.

This six-tile mural from the first half of the 20th century, depicts
Michelangelo’s magnificent Libyan Sibyl, Phemonoe, the daughter of Zeus and Poseidon’s daughter, Lamia. Phemonoe foretold the “coming of the day when that which is hidden shall be revealed”.

Each of the 6 tiles are 12″ x 12″, with the full image 36″ x 24″.  1st half, 20th century

I have also added a link to view the full ceiling.
https://upload.wikimedia.org/…/07/CAPPELLA_SISTINA_Ceiling.…

36 x 24 inches

91.44 x 60.96 cm

$3500




More items related to: , , ,

6-Tile Mural, Libyan Sibyl from Sistine Chapel

Michelangelo di Lodovico Buonarroti Simoni (1475-1564), universally known simply as Michelangelo, was arguably the greatest artist of all time. His sculpture of David is probably the most famous sculpture in the world and his frescoes on the ceiling of the Sistine Chapel are possibly man’s greatest achievement in the history of painting.

Despite his distaste for painting (he was a sculptor and considered painting to be less serious), he reluctantly accepted the commission of this arduous project from Pope Julius II in 1508. Painted between 1508 and 1512, the Sistine Chapel ceiling features 343 figures within more than 5000 square feet of painted ceiling.

Contrary to popular belief, Michelangelo did not paint the ceiling while laying on his back. Holes were drilled into the walls above the windows in the room from which brackets were placed to support a large flat scaffold on which he stood to paint. Even so, the work was physically demanding and Michelangelo wrote this amusing sonnet describing the results.
I’ve grown a goitre by dwelling in this den–
As cats from stagnant streams in Lombardy,
Or in what other land they hap to be–
Which drives the belly close beneath the chin:

My beard turns up to heaven; my nape falls in,
Fixed on my spine: my breast-bone visibly
Grows like a harp: a rich embroidery
Bedews my face from brush-drops thick and thin.

My loins into my paunch like levers grind:
My buttock like a crupper bears my weight;
My feet unguided wander to and fro;
In front my skin grows loose and long; behind,

By bending it becomes more taut and strait;
Crosswise I strain me like a Syrian bow:
Whence false and quaint, I know,
Must be the fruit of squinting brain and eye;

For ill can aim the gun that bends awry.
Come then, Giovanni, try
To succour my dead pictures and my fame;
Since foul I fare and painting is my shame.

This six-tile mural from the first half of the 20th century, depicts
Michelangelo’s magnificent Libyan Sibyl, Phemonoe, the daughter of Zeus and Poseidon’s daughter, Lamia. Phemonoe foretold the “coming of the day when that which is hidden shall be revealed”.

Each of the 6 tiles are 12″ x 12″, with the full image 36″ x 24″.  1st half, 20th century

I have also added a link to view the full ceiling.
https://upload.wikimedia.org/…/07/CAPPELLA_SISTINA_Ceiling.…

36 x 24 inches

91.44 x 60.96 cm

$3500




More items related to: , , ,

6-Tile Mural, Libyan Sibyl from Sistine Chapel

Michelangelo di Lodovico Buonarroti Simoni (1475-1564), universally known simply as Michelangelo, was arguably the greatest artist of all time. His sculpture of David is probably the most famous sculpture in the world and his frescoes on the ceiling of the Sistine Chapel are possibly man’s greatest achievement in the history of painting.

Despite his distaste for painting (he was a sculptor and considered painting to be less serious), he reluctantly accepted the commission of this arduous project from Pope Julius II in 1508. Painted between 1508 and 1512, the Sistine Chapel ceiling features 343 figures within more than 5000 square feet of painted ceiling.

Contrary to popular belief, Michelangelo did not paint the ceiling while laying on his back. Holes were drilled into the walls above the windows in the room from which brackets were placed to support a large flat scaffold on which he stood to paint. Even so, the work was physically demanding and Michelangelo wrote this amusing sonnet describing the results.
I’ve grown a goitre by dwelling in this den–
As cats from stagnant streams in Lombardy,
Or in what other land they hap to be–
Which drives the belly close beneath the chin:

My beard turns up to heaven; my nape falls in,
Fixed on my spine: my breast-bone visibly
Grows like a harp: a rich embroidery
Bedews my face from brush-drops thick and thin.

My loins into my paunch like levers grind:
My buttock like a crupper bears my weight;
My feet unguided wander to and fro;
In front my skin grows loose and long; behind,

By bending it becomes more taut and strait;
Crosswise I strain me like a Syrian bow:
Whence false and quaint, I know,
Must be the fruit of squinting brain and eye;

For ill can aim the gun that bends awry.
Come then, Giovanni, try
To succour my dead pictures and my fame;
Since foul I fare and painting is my shame.

This six-tile mural from the first half of the 20th century, depicts
Michelangelo’s magnificent Libyan Sibyl, Phemonoe, the daughter of Zeus and Poseidon’s daughter, Lamia. Phemonoe foretold the “coming of the day when that which is hidden shall be revealed”.

Each of the 6 tiles are 12″ x 12″, with the full image 36″ x 24″.  1st half, 20th century

I have also added a link to view the full ceiling.
https://upload.wikimedia.org/…/07/CAPPELLA_SISTINA_Ceiling.…

36 x 24 inches

91.44 x 60.96 cm

$3500




More items related to: , , ,

6-Tile Mural, Libyan Sibyl from Sistine Chapel

Michelangelo di Lodovico Buonarroti Simoni (1475-1564), universally known simply as Michelangelo, was arguably the greatest artist of all time. His sculpture of David is probably the most famous sculpture in the world and his frescoes on the ceiling of the Sistine Chapel are possibly man’s greatest achievement in the history of painting.

Despite his distaste for painting (he was a sculptor and considered painting to be less serious), he reluctantly accepted the commission of this arduous project from Pope Julius II in 1508. Painted between 1508 and 1512, the Sistine Chapel ceiling features 343 figures within more than 5000 square feet of painted ceiling.

Contrary to popular belief, Michelangelo did not paint the ceiling while laying on his back. Holes were drilled into the walls above the windows in the room from which brackets were placed to support a large flat scaffold on which he stood to paint. Even so, the work was physically demanding and Michelangelo wrote this amusing sonnet describing the results.
I’ve grown a goitre by dwelling in this den–
As cats from stagnant streams in Lombardy,
Or in what other land they hap to be–
Which drives the belly close beneath the chin:

My beard turns up to heaven; my nape falls in,
Fixed on my spine: my breast-bone visibly
Grows like a harp: a rich embroidery
Bedews my face from brush-drops thick and thin.

My loins into my paunch like levers grind:
My buttock like a crupper bears my weight;
My feet unguided wander to and fro;
In front my skin grows loose and long; behind,

By bending it becomes more taut and strait;
Crosswise I strain me like a Syrian bow:
Whence false and quaint, I know,
Must be the fruit of squinting brain and eye;

For ill can aim the gun that bends awry.
Come then, Giovanni, try
To succour my dead pictures and my fame;
Since foul I fare and painting is my shame.

This six-tile mural from the first half of the 20th century, depicts
Michelangelo’s magnificent Libyan Sibyl, Phemonoe, the daughter of Zeus and Poseidon’s daughter, Lamia. Phemonoe foretold the “coming of the day when that which is hidden shall be revealed”.

Each of the 6 tiles are 12″ x 12″, with the full image 36″ x 24″.  1st half, 20th century

I have also added a link to view the full ceiling.
https://upload.wikimedia.org/…/07/CAPPELLA_SISTINA_Ceiling.…

36 x 24 inches

91.44 x 60.96 cm

$3500




More items related to: , , ,

6-Tile Mural, Libyan Sibyl from Sistine Chapel

Michelangelo di Lodovico Buonarroti Simoni (1475-1564), universally known simply as Michelangelo, was arguably the greatest artist of all time. His sculpture of David is probably the most famous sculpture in the world and his frescoes on the ceiling of the Sistine Chapel are possibly man’s greatest achievement in the history of painting.

Despite his distaste for painting (he was a sculptor and considered painting to be less serious), he reluctantly accepted the commission of this arduous project from Pope Julius II in 1508. Painted between 1508 and 1512, the Sistine Chapel ceiling features 343 figures within more than 5000 square feet of painted ceiling.

Contrary to popular belief, Michelangelo did not paint the ceiling while laying on his back. Holes were drilled into the walls above the windows in the room from which brackets were placed to support a large flat scaffold on which he stood to paint. Even so, the work was physically demanding and Michelangelo wrote this amusing sonnet describing the results.
I’ve grown a goitre by dwelling in this den–
As cats from stagnant streams in Lombardy,
Or in what other land they hap to be–
Which drives the belly close beneath the chin:

My beard turns up to heaven; my nape falls in,
Fixed on my spine: my breast-bone visibly
Grows like a harp: a rich embroidery
Bedews my face from brush-drops thick and thin.

My loins into my paunch like levers grind:
My buttock like a crupper bears my weight;
My feet unguided wander to and fro;
In front my skin grows loose and long; behind,

By bending it becomes more taut and strait;
Crosswise I strain me like a Syrian bow:
Whence false and quaint, I know,
Must be the fruit of squinting brain and eye;

For ill can aim the gun that bends awry.
Come then, Giovanni, try
To succour my dead pictures and my fame;
Since foul I fare and painting is my shame.

This six-tile mural from the first half of the 20th century, depicts
Michelangelo’s magnificent Libyan Sibyl, Phemonoe, the daughter of Zeus and Poseidon’s daughter, Lamia. Phemonoe foretold the “coming of the day when that which is hidden shall be revealed”.

Each of the 6 tiles are 12″ x 12″, with the full image 36″ x 24″.  1st half, 20th century

I have also added a link to view the full ceiling.
https://upload.wikimedia.org/…/07/CAPPELLA_SISTINA_Ceiling.…

36 x 24 inches

91.44 x 60.96 cm

$3500




More items related to: , , ,

6-Tile Mural, Libyan Sibyl from Sistine Chapel

Michelangelo di Lodovico Buonarroti Simoni (1475-1564), universally known simply as Michelangelo, was arguably the greatest artist of all time. His sculpture of David is probably the most famous sculpture in the world and his frescoes on the ceiling of the Sistine Chapel are possibly man’s greatest achievement in the history of painting.

Despite his distaste for painting (he was a sculptor and considered painting to be less serious), he reluctantly accepted the commission of this arduous project from Pope Julius II in 1508. Painted between 1508 and 1512, the Sistine Chapel ceiling features 343 figures within more than 5000 square feet of painted ceiling.

Contrary to popular belief, Michelangelo did not paint the ceiling while laying on his back. Holes were drilled into the walls above the windows in the room from which brackets were placed to support a large flat scaffold on which he stood to paint. Even so, the work was physically demanding and Michelangelo wrote this amusing sonnet describing the results.
I’ve grown a goitre by dwelling in this den–
As cats from stagnant streams in Lombardy,
Or in what other land they hap to be–
Which drives the belly close beneath the chin:

My beard turns up to heaven; my nape falls in,
Fixed on my spine: my breast-bone visibly
Grows like a harp: a rich embroidery
Bedews my face from brush-drops thick and thin.

My loins into my paunch like levers grind:
My buttock like a crupper bears my weight;
My feet unguided wander to and fro;
In front my skin grows loose and long; behind,

By bending it becomes more taut and strait;
Crosswise I strain me like a Syrian bow:
Whence false and quaint, I know,
Must be the fruit of squinting brain and eye;

For ill can aim the gun that bends awry.
Come then, Giovanni, try
To succour my dead pictures and my fame;
Since foul I fare and painting is my shame.

This six-tile mural from the first half of the 20th century, depicts
Michelangelo’s magnificent Libyan Sibyl, Phemonoe, the daughter of Zeus and Poseidon’s daughter, Lamia. Phemonoe foretold the “coming of the day when that which is hidden shall be revealed”.

Each of the 6 tiles are 12″ x 12″, with the full image 36″ x 24″.  1st half, 20th century

I have also added a link to view the full ceiling.
https://upload.wikimedia.org/…/07/CAPPELLA_SISTINA_Ceiling.…

36 x 24 inches

91.44 x 60.96 cm

$3500




More items related to: , , ,

6-Tile Mural, Libyan Sibyl from Sistine Chapel

Michelangelo di Lodovico Buonarroti Simoni (1475-1564), universally known simply as Michelangelo, was arguably the greatest artist of all time. His sculpture of David is probably the most famous sculpture in the world and his frescoes on the ceiling of the Sistine Chapel are possibly man’s greatest achievement in the history of painting.

Despite his distaste for painting (he was a sculptor and considered painting to be less serious), he reluctantly accepted the commission of this arduous project from Pope Julius II in 1508. Painted between 1508 and 1512, the Sistine Chapel ceiling features 343 figures within more than 5000 square feet of painted ceiling.

Contrary to popular belief, Michelangelo did not paint the ceiling while laying on his back. Holes were drilled into the walls above the windows in the room from which brackets were placed to support a large flat scaffold on which he stood to paint. Even so, the work was physically demanding and Michelangelo wrote this amusing sonnet describing the results.
I’ve grown a goitre by dwelling in this den–
As cats from stagnant streams in Lombardy,
Or in what other land they hap to be–
Which drives the belly close beneath the chin:

My beard turns up to heaven; my nape falls in,
Fixed on my spine: my breast-bone visibly
Grows like a harp: a rich embroidery
Bedews my face from brush-drops thick and thin.

My loins into my paunch like levers grind:
My buttock like a crupper bears my weight;
My feet unguided wander to and fro;
In front my skin grows loose and long; behind,

By bending it becomes more taut and strait;
Crosswise I strain me like a Syrian bow:
Whence false and quaint, I know,
Must be the fruit of squinting brain and eye;

For ill can aim the gun that bends awry.
Come then, Giovanni, try
To succour my dead pictures and my fame;
Since foul I fare and painting is my shame.

This six-tile mural from the first half of the 20th century, depicts
Michelangelo’s magnificent Libyan Sibyl, Phemonoe, the daughter of Zeus and Poseidon’s daughter, Lamia. Phemonoe foretold the “coming of the day when that which is hidden shall be revealed”.

Each of the 6 tiles are 12″ x 12″, with the full image 36″ x 24″.  1st half, 20th century

I have also added a link to view the full ceiling.
https://upload.wikimedia.org/…/07/CAPPELLA_SISTINA_Ceiling.…

36 x 24 inches

91.44 x 60.96 cm

$3500




More items related to: , , ,

6-Tile Mural, Libyan Sibyl from Sistine Chapel

Michelangelo di Lodovico Buonarroti Simoni (1475-1564), universally known simply as Michelangelo, was arguably the greatest artist of all time. His sculpture of David is probably the most famous sculpture in the world and his frescoes on the ceiling of the Sistine Chapel are possibly man’s greatest achievement in the history of painting.

Despite his distaste for painting (he was a sculptor and considered painting to be less serious), he reluctantly accepted the commission of this arduous project from Pope Julius II in 1508. Painted between 1508 and 1512, the Sistine Chapel ceiling features 343 figures within more than 5000 square feet of painted ceiling.

Contrary to popular belief, Michelangelo did not paint the ceiling while laying on his back. Holes were drilled into the walls above the windows in the room from which brackets were placed to support a large flat scaffold on which he stood to paint. Even so, the work was physically demanding and Michelangelo wrote this amusing sonnet describing the results.
I’ve grown a goitre by dwelling in this den–
As cats from stagnant streams in Lombardy,
Or in what other land they hap to be–
Which drives the belly close beneath the chin:

My beard turns up to heaven; my nape falls in,
Fixed on my spine: my breast-bone visibly
Grows like a harp: a rich embroidery
Bedews my face from brush-drops thick and thin.

My loins into my paunch like levers grind:
My buttock like a crupper bears my weight;
My feet unguided wander to and fro;
In front my skin grows loose and long; behind,

By bending it becomes more taut and strait;
Crosswise I strain me like a Syrian bow:
Whence false and quaint, I know,
Must be the fruit of squinting brain and eye;

For ill can aim the gun that bends awry.
Come then, Giovanni, try
To succour my dead pictures and my fame;
Since foul I fare and painting is my shame.

This six-tile mural from the first half of the 20th century, depicts
Michelangelo’s magnificent Libyan Sibyl, Phemonoe, the daughter of Zeus and Poseidon’s daughter, Lamia. Phemonoe foretold the “coming of the day when that which is hidden shall be revealed”.

Each of the 6 tiles are 12″ x 12″, with the full image 36″ x 24″.  1st half, 20th century

I have also added a link to view the full ceiling.
https://upload.wikimedia.org/…/07/CAPPELLA_SISTINA_Ceiling.…

36 x 24 inches

91.44 x 60.96 cm

$3500




More items related to: , , ,

6-Tile Mural, Libyan Sibyl from Sistine Chapel

Michelangelo di Lodovico Buonarroti Simoni (1475-1564), universally known simply as Michelangelo, was arguably the greatest artist of all time. His sculpture of David is probably the most famous sculpture in the world and his frescoes on the ceiling of the Sistine Chapel are possibly man’s greatest achievement in the history of painting.

Despite his distaste for painting (he was a sculptor and considered painting to be less serious), he reluctantly accepted the commission of this arduous project from Pope Julius II in 1508. Painted between 1508 and 1512, the Sistine Chapel ceiling features 343 figures within more than 5000 square feet of painted ceiling.

Contrary to popular belief, Michelangelo did not paint the ceiling while laying on his back. Holes were drilled into the walls above the windows in the room from which brackets were placed to support a large flat scaffold on which he stood to paint. Even so, the work was physically demanding and Michelangelo wrote this amusing sonnet describing the results.
I’ve grown a goitre by dwelling in this den–
As cats from stagnant streams in Lombardy,
Or in what other land they hap to be–
Which drives the belly close beneath the chin:

My beard turns up to heaven; my nape falls in,
Fixed on my spine: my breast-bone visibly
Grows like a harp: a rich embroidery
Bedews my face from brush-drops thick and thin.

My loins into my paunch like levers grind:
My buttock like a crupper bears my weight;
My feet unguided wander to and fro;
In front my skin grows loose and long; behind,

By bending it becomes more taut and strait;
Crosswise I strain me like a Syrian bow:
Whence false and quaint, I know,
Must be the fruit of squinting brain and eye;

For ill can aim the gun that bends awry.
Come then, Giovanni, try
To succour my dead pictures and my fame;
Since foul I fare and painting is my shame.

This six-tile mural from the first half of the 20th century, depicts
Michelangelo’s magnificent Libyan Sibyl, Phemonoe, the daughter of Zeus and Poseidon’s daughter, Lamia. Phemonoe foretold the “coming of the day when that which is hidden shall be revealed”.

Each of the 6 tiles are 12″ x 12″, with the full image 36″ x 24″.  1st half, 20th century

I have also added a link to view the full ceiling.
https://upload.wikimedia.org/…/07/CAPPELLA_SISTINA_Ceiling.…

36 x 24 inches

91.44 x 60.96 cm

$3500




More items related to: , , ,

6-Tile Mural, Libyan Sibyl from Sistine Chapel

Michelangelo di Lodovico Buonarroti Simoni (1475-1564), universally known simply as Michelangelo, was arguably the greatest artist of all time. His sculpture of David is probably the most famous sculpture in the world and his frescoes on the ceiling of the Sistine Chapel are possibly man’s greatest achievement in the history of painting.

Despite his distaste for painting (he was a sculptor and considered painting to be less serious), he reluctantly accepted the commission of this arduous project from Pope Julius II in 1508. Painted between 1508 and 1512, the Sistine Chapel ceiling features 343 figures within more than 5000 square feet of painted ceiling.

Contrary to popular belief, Michelangelo did not paint the ceiling while laying on his back. Holes were drilled into the walls above the windows in the room from which brackets were placed to support a large flat scaffold on which he stood to paint. Even so, the work was physically demanding and Michelangelo wrote this amusing sonnet describing the results.
I’ve grown a goitre by dwelling in this den–
As cats from stagnant streams in Lombardy,
Or in what other land they hap to be–
Which drives the belly close beneath the chin:

My beard turns up to heaven; my nape falls in,
Fixed on my spine: my breast-bone visibly
Grows like a harp: a rich embroidery
Bedews my face from brush-drops thick and thin.

My loins into my paunch like levers grind:
My buttock like a crupper bears my weight;
My feet unguided wander to and fro;
In front my skin grows loose and long; behind,

By bending it becomes more taut and strait;
Crosswise I strain me like a Syrian bow:
Whence false and quaint, I know,
Must be the fruit of squinting brain and eye;

For ill can aim the gun that bends awry.
Come then, Giovanni, try
To succour my dead pictures and my fame;
Since foul I fare and painting is my shame.

This six-tile mural from the first half of the 20th century, depicts
Michelangelo’s magnificent Libyan Sibyl, Phemonoe, the daughter of Zeus and Poseidon’s daughter, Lamia. Phemonoe foretold the “coming of the day when that which is hidden shall be revealed”.

Each of the 6 tiles are 12″ x 12″, with the full image 36″ x 24″.  1st half, 20th century

I have also added a link to view the full ceiling.
https://upload.wikimedia.org/…/07/CAPPELLA_SISTINA_Ceiling.…

36 x 24 inches

91.44 x 60.96 cm

$3500




More items related to: , , ,

6-Tile Mural, Libyan Sibyl from Sistine Chapel

Michelangelo di Lodovico Buonarroti Simoni (1475-1564), universally known simply as Michelangelo, was arguably the greatest artist of all time. His sculpture of David is probably the most famous sculpture in the world and his frescoes on the ceiling of the Sistine Chapel are possibly man’s greatest achievement in the history of painting.

Despite his distaste for painting (he was a sculptor and considered painting to be less serious), he reluctantly accepted the commission of this arduous project from Pope Julius II in 1508. Painted between 1508 and 1512, the Sistine Chapel ceiling features 343 figures within more than 5000 square feet of painted ceiling.

Contrary to popular belief, Michelangelo did not paint the ceiling while laying on his back. Holes were drilled into the walls above the windows in the room from which brackets were placed to support a large flat scaffold on which he stood to paint. Even so, the work was physically demanding and Michelangelo wrote this amusing sonnet describing the results.
I’ve grown a goitre by dwelling in this den–
As cats from stagnant streams in Lombardy,
Or in what other land they hap to be–
Which drives the belly close beneath the chin:

My beard turns up to heaven; my nape falls in,
Fixed on my spine: my breast-bone visibly
Grows like a harp: a rich embroidery
Bedews my face from brush-drops thick and thin.

My loins into my paunch like levers grind:
My buttock like a crupper bears my weight;
My feet unguided wander to and fro;
In front my skin grows loose and long; behind,

By bending it becomes more taut and strait;
Crosswise I strain me like a Syrian bow:
Whence false and quaint, I know,
Must be the fruit of squinting brain and eye;

For ill can aim the gun that bends awry.
Come then, Giovanni, try
To succour my dead pictures and my fame;
Since foul I fare and painting is my shame.

This six-tile mural from the first half of the 20th century, depicts
Michelangelo’s magnificent Libyan Sibyl, Phemonoe, the daughter of Zeus and Poseidon’s daughter, Lamia. Phemonoe foretold the “coming of the day when that which is hidden shall be revealed”.

Each of the 6 tiles are 12″ x 12″, with the full image 36″ x 24″.  1st half, 20th century

I have also added a link to view the full ceiling.
https://upload.wikimedia.org/…/07/CAPPELLA_SISTINA_Ceiling.…

36 x 24 inches

91.44 x 60.96 cm

$3500




More items related to: , , ,

6-Tile Mural, Libyan Sibyl from Sistine Chapel

Michelangelo di Lodovico Buonarroti Simoni (1475-1564), universally known simply as Michelangelo, was arguably the greatest artist of all time. His sculpture of David is probably the most famous sculpture in the world and his frescoes on the ceiling of the Sistine Chapel are possibly man’s greatest achievement in the history of painting.

Despite his distaste for painting (he was a sculptor and considered painting to be less serious), he reluctantly accepted the commission of this arduous project from Pope Julius II in 1508. Painted between 1508 and 1512, the Sistine Chapel ceiling features 343 figures within more than 5000 square feet of painted ceiling.

Contrary to popular belief, Michelangelo did not paint the ceiling while laying on his back. Holes were drilled into the walls above the windows in the room from which brackets were placed to support a large flat scaffold on which he stood to paint. Even so, the work was physically demanding and Michelangelo wrote this amusing sonnet describing the results.
I’ve grown a goitre by dwelling in this den–
As cats from stagnant streams in Lombardy,
Or in what other land they hap to be–
Which drives the belly close beneath the chin:

My beard turns up to heaven; my nape falls in,
Fixed on my spine: my breast-bone visibly
Grows like a harp: a rich embroidery
Bedews my face from brush-drops thick and thin.

My loins into my paunch like levers grind:
My buttock like a crupper bears my weight;
My feet unguided wander to and fro;
In front my skin grows loose and long; behind,

By bending it becomes more taut and strait;
Crosswise I strain me like a Syrian bow:
Whence false and quaint, I know,
Must be the fruit of squinting brain and eye;

For ill can aim the gun that bends awry.
Come then, Giovanni, try
To succour my dead pictures and my fame;
Since foul I fare and painting is my shame.

This six-tile mural from the first half of the 20th century, depicts
Michelangelo’s magnificent Libyan Sibyl, Phemonoe, the daughter of Zeus and Poseidon’s daughter, Lamia. Phemonoe foretold the “coming of the day when that which is hidden shall be revealed”.

Each of the 6 tiles are 12″ x 12″, with the full image 36″ x 24″.  1st half, 20th century

I have also added a link to view the full ceiling.
https://upload.wikimedia.org/…/07/CAPPELLA_SISTINA_Ceiling.…

36 x 24 inches

91.44 x 60.96 cm

$3500




More items related to: , , ,

6-Tile Mural, Libyan Sibyl from Sistine Chapel

Michelangelo di Lodovico Buonarroti Simoni (1475-1564), universally known simply as Michelangelo, was arguably the greatest artist of all time. His sculpture of David is probably the most famous sculpture in the world and his frescoes on the ceiling of the Sistine Chapel are possibly man’s greatest achievement in the history of painting.

Despite his distaste for painting (he was a sculptor and considered painting to be less serious), he reluctantly accepted the commission of this arduous project from Pope Julius II in 1508. Painted between 1508 and 1512, the Sistine Chapel ceiling features 343 figures within more than 5000 square feet of painted ceiling.

Contrary to popular belief, Michelangelo did not paint the ceiling while laying on his back. Holes were drilled into the walls above the windows in the room from which brackets were placed to support a large flat scaffold on which he stood to paint. Even so, the work was physically demanding and Michelangelo wrote this amusing sonnet describing the results.
I’ve grown a goitre by dwelling in this den–
As cats from stagnant streams in Lombardy,
Or in what other land they hap to be–
Which drives the belly close beneath the chin:

My beard turns up to heaven; my nape falls in,
Fixed on my spine: my breast-bone visibly
Grows like a harp: a rich embroidery
Bedews my face from brush-drops thick and thin.

My loins into my paunch like levers grind:
My buttock like a crupper bears my weight;
My feet unguided wander to and fro;
In front my skin grows loose and long; behind,

By bending it becomes more taut and strait;
Crosswise I strain me like a Syrian bow:
Whence false and quaint, I know,
Must be the fruit of squinting brain and eye;

For ill can aim the gun that bends awry.
Come then, Giovanni, try
To succour my dead pictures and my fame;
Since foul I fare and painting is my shame.

This six-tile mural from the first half of the 20th century, depicts
Michelangelo’s magnificent Libyan Sibyl, Phemonoe, the daughter of Zeus and Poseidon’s daughter, Lamia. Phemonoe foretold the “coming of the day when that which is hidden shall be revealed”.

Each of the 6 tiles are 12″ x 12″, with the full image 36″ x 24″.  1st half, 20th century

I have also added a link to view the full ceiling.
https://upload.wikimedia.org/…/07/CAPPELLA_SISTINA_Ceiling.…

36 x 24 inches

91.44 x 60.96 cm

$3500




More items related to: , , ,

6-Tile Mural, Libyan Sibyl from Sistine Chapel

Michelangelo di Lodovico Buonarroti Simoni (1475-1564), universally known simply as Michelangelo, was arguably the greatest artist of all time. His sculpture of David is probably the most famous sculpture in the world and his frescoes on the ceiling of the Sistine Chapel are possibly man’s greatest achievement in the history of painting.

Despite his distaste for painting (he was a sculptor and considered painting to be less serious), he reluctantly accepted the commission of this arduous project from Pope Julius II in 1508. Painted between 1508 and 1512, the Sistine Chapel ceiling features 343 figures within more than 5000 square feet of painted ceiling.

Contrary to popular belief, Michelangelo did not paint the ceiling while laying on his back. Holes were drilled into the walls above the windows in the room from which brackets were placed to support a large flat scaffold on which he stood to paint. Even so, the work was physically demanding and Michelangelo wrote this amusing sonnet describing the results.
I’ve grown a goitre by dwelling in this den–
As cats from stagnant streams in Lombardy,
Or in what other land they hap to be–
Which drives the belly close beneath the chin:

My beard turns up to heaven; my nape falls in,
Fixed on my spine: my breast-bone visibly
Grows like a harp: a rich embroidery
Bedews my face from brush-drops thick and thin.

My loins into my paunch like levers grind:
My buttock like a crupper bears my weight;
My feet unguided wander to and fro;
In front my skin grows loose and long; behind,

By bending it becomes more taut and strait;
Crosswise I strain me like a Syrian bow:
Whence false and quaint, I know,
Must be the fruit of squinting brain and eye;

For ill can aim the gun that bends awry.
Come then, Giovanni, try
To succour my dead pictures and my fame;
Since foul I fare and painting is my shame.

This six-tile mural from the first half of the 20th century, depicts
Michelangelo’s magnificent Libyan Sibyl, Phemonoe, the daughter of Zeus and Poseidon’s daughter, Lamia. Phemonoe foretold the “coming of the day when that which is hidden shall be revealed”.

Each of the 6 tiles are 12″ x 12″, with the full image 36″ x 24″.  1st half, 20th century

I have also added a link to view the full ceiling.
https://upload.wikimedia.org/…/07/CAPPELLA_SISTINA_Ceiling.…

36 x 24 inches

91.44 x 60.96 cm

$3500




More items related to: , , ,

6-Tile Mural, Libyan Sibyl from Sistine Chapel

Michelangelo di Lodovico Buonarroti Simoni (1475-1564), universally known simply as Michelangelo, was arguably the greatest artist of all time. His sculpture of David is probably the most famous sculpture in the world and his frescoes on the ceiling of the Sistine Chapel are possibly man’s greatest achievement in the history of painting.

Despite his distaste for painting (he was a sculptor and considered painting to be less serious), he reluctantly accepted the commission of this arduous project from Pope Julius II in 1508. Painted between 1508 and 1512, the Sistine Chapel ceiling features 343 figures within more than 5000 square feet of painted ceiling.

Contrary to popular belief, Michelangelo did not paint the ceiling while laying on his back. Holes were drilled into the walls above the windows in the room from which brackets were placed to support a large flat scaffold on which he stood to paint. Even so, the work was physically demanding and Michelangelo wrote this amusing sonnet describing the results.
I’ve grown a goitre by dwelling in this den–
As cats from stagnant streams in Lombardy,
Or in what other land they hap to be–
Which drives the belly close beneath the chin:

My beard turns up to heaven; my nape falls in,
Fixed on my spine: my breast-bone visibly
Grows like a harp: a rich embroidery
Bedews my face from brush-drops thick and thin.

My loins into my paunch like levers grind:
My buttock like a crupper bears my weight;
My feet unguided wander to and fro;
In front my skin grows loose and long; behind,

By bending it becomes more taut and strait;
Crosswise I strain me like a Syrian bow:
Whence false and quaint, I know,
Must be the fruit of squinting brain and eye;

For ill can aim the gun that bends awry.
Come then, Giovanni, try
To succour my dead pictures and my fame;
Since foul I fare and painting is my shame.

This six-tile mural from the first half of the 20th century, depicts
Michelangelo’s magnificent Libyan Sibyl, Phemonoe, the daughter of Zeus and Poseidon’s daughter, Lamia. Phemonoe foretold the “coming of the day when that which is hidden shall be revealed”.

Each of the 6 tiles are 12″ x 12″, with the full image 36″ x 24″.  1st half, 20th century

I have also added a link to view the full ceiling.
https://upload.wikimedia.org/…/07/CAPPELLA_SISTINA_Ceiling.…

36 x 24 inches

91.44 x 60.96 cm

$3500




More items related to: , , ,

6-Tile Mural, Libyan Sibyl from Sistine Chapel

Michelangelo di Lodovico Buonarroti Simoni (1475-1564), universally known simply as Michelangelo, was arguably the greatest artist of all time. His sculpture of David is probably the most famous sculpture in the world and his frescoes on the ceiling of the Sistine Chapel are possibly man’s greatest achievement in the history of painting.

Despite his distaste for painting (he was a sculptor and considered painting to be less serious), he reluctantly accepted the commission of this arduous project from Pope Julius II in 1508. Painted between 1508 and 1512, the Sistine Chapel ceiling features 343 figures within more than 5000 square feet of painted ceiling.

Contrary to popular belief, Michelangelo did not paint the ceiling while laying on his back. Holes were drilled into the walls above the windows in the room from which brackets were placed to support a large flat scaffold on which he stood to paint. Even so, the work was physically demanding and Michelangelo wrote this amusing sonnet describing the results.
I’ve grown a goitre by dwelling in this den–
As cats from stagnant streams in Lombardy,
Or in what other land they hap to be–
Which drives the belly close beneath the chin:

My beard turns up to heaven; my nape falls in,
Fixed on my spine: my breast-bone visibly
Grows like a harp: a rich embroidery
Bedews my face from brush-drops thick and thin.

My loins into my paunch like levers grind:
My buttock like a crupper bears my weight;
My feet unguided wander to and fro;
In front my skin grows loose and long; behind,

By bending it becomes more taut and strait;
Crosswise I strain me like a Syrian bow:
Whence false and quaint, I know,
Must be the fruit of squinting brain and eye;

For ill can aim the gun that bends awry.
Come then, Giovanni, try
To succour my dead pictures and my fame;
Since foul I fare and painting is my shame.

This six-tile mural from the first half of the 20th century, depicts
Michelangelo’s magnificent Libyan Sibyl, Phemonoe, the daughter of Zeus and Poseidon’s daughter, Lamia. Phemonoe foretold the “coming of the day when that which is hidden shall be revealed”.

Each of the 6 tiles are 12″ x 12″, with the full image 36″ x 24″.  1st half, 20th century

I have also added a link to view the full ceiling.
https://upload.wikimedia.org/…/07/CAPPELLA_SISTINA_Ceiling.…

36 x 24 inches

91.44 x 60.96 cm

$3500




More items related to: , , ,

6-Tile Mural, Libyan Sibyl from Sistine Chapel

Michelangelo di Lodovico Buonarroti Simoni (1475-1564), universally known simply as Michelangelo, was arguably the greatest artist of all time. His sculpture of David is probably the most famous sculpture in the world and his frescoes on the ceiling of the Sistine Chapel are possibly man’s greatest achievement in the history of painting.

Despite his distaste for painting (he was a sculptor and considered painting to be less serious), he reluctantly accepted the commission of this arduous project from Pope Julius II in 1508. Painted between 1508 and 1512, the Sistine Chapel ceiling features 343 figures within more than 5000 square feet of painted ceiling.

Contrary to popular belief, Michelangelo did not paint the ceiling while laying on his back. Holes were drilled into the walls above the windows in the room from which brackets were placed to support a large flat scaffold on which he stood to paint. Even so, the work was physically demanding and Michelangelo wrote this amusing sonnet describing the results.
I’ve grown a goitre by dwelling in this den–
As cats from stagnant streams in Lombardy,
Or in what other land they hap to be–
Which drives the belly close beneath the chin:

My beard turns up to heaven; my nape falls in,
Fixed on my spine: my breast-bone visibly
Grows like a harp: a rich embroidery
Bedews my face from brush-drops thick and thin.

My loins into my paunch like levers grind:
My buttock like a crupper bears my weight;
My feet unguided wander to and fro;
In front my skin grows loose and long; behind,

By bending it becomes more taut and strait;
Crosswise I strain me like a Syrian bow:
Whence false and quaint, I know,
Must be the fruit of squinting brain and eye;

For ill can aim the gun that bends awry.
Come then, Giovanni, try
To succour my dead pictures and my fame;
Since foul I fare and painting is my shame.

This six-tile mural from the first half of the 20th century, depicts
Michelangelo’s magnificent Libyan Sibyl, Phemonoe, the daughter of Zeus and Poseidon’s daughter, Lamia. Phemonoe foretold the “coming of the day when that which is hidden shall be revealed”.

Each of the 6 tiles are 12″ x 12″, with the full image 36″ x 24″.  1st half, 20th century

I have also added a link to view the full ceiling.
https://upload.wikimedia.org/…/07/CAPPELLA_SISTINA_Ceiling.…

36 x 24 inches

91.44 x 60.96 cm

$3500




More items related to: , , ,

6-Tile Mural, Libyan Sibyl from Sistine Chapel

Michelangelo di Lodovico Buonarroti Simoni (1475-1564), universally known simply as Michelangelo, was arguably the greatest artist of all time. His sculpture of David is probably the most famous sculpture in the world and his frescoes on the ceiling of the Sistine Chapel are possibly man’s greatest achievement in the history of painting.

Despite his distaste for painting (he was a sculptor and considered painting to be less serious), he reluctantly accepted the commission of this arduous project from Pope Julius II in 1508. Painted between 1508 and 1512, the Sistine Chapel ceiling features 343 figures within more than 5000 square feet of painted ceiling.

Contrary to popular belief, Michelangelo did not paint the ceiling while laying on his back. Holes were drilled into the walls above the windows in the room from which brackets were placed to support a large flat scaffold on which he stood to paint. Even so, the work was physically demanding and Michelangelo wrote this amusing sonnet describing the results.
I’ve grown a goitre by dwelling in this den–
As cats from stagnant streams in Lombardy,
Or in what other land they hap to be–
Which drives the belly close beneath the chin:

My beard turns up to heaven; my nape falls in,
Fixed on my spine: my breast-bone visibly
Grows like a harp: a rich embroidery
Bedews my face from brush-drops thick and thin.

My loins into my paunch like levers grind:
My buttock like a crupper bears my weight;
My feet unguided wander to and fro;
In front my skin grows loose and long; behind,

By bending it becomes more taut and strait;
Crosswise I strain me like a Syrian bow:
Whence false and quaint, I know,
Must be the fruit of squinting brain and eye;

For ill can aim the gun that bends awry.
Come then, Giovanni, try
To succour my dead pictures and my fame;
Since foul I fare and painting is my shame.

This six-tile mural from the first half of the 20th century, depicts
Michelangelo’s magnificent Libyan Sibyl, Phemonoe, the daughter of Zeus and Poseidon’s daughter, Lamia. Phemonoe foretold the “coming of the day when that which is hidden shall be revealed”.

Each of the 6 tiles are 12″ x 12″, with the full image 36″ x 24″.  1st half, 20th century

I have also added a link to view the full ceiling.
https://upload.wikimedia.org/…/07/CAPPELLA_SISTINA_Ceiling.…

36 x 24 inches

91.44 x 60.96 cm

$3500




More items related to: , , ,

6-Tile Mural, Libyan Sibyl from Sistine Chapel

Michelangelo di Lodovico Buonarroti Simoni (1475-1564), universally known simply as Michelangelo, was arguably the greatest artist of all time. His sculpture of David is probably the most famous sculpture in the world and his frescoes on the ceiling of the Sistine Chapel are possibly man’s greatest achievement in the history of painting.

Despite his distaste for painting (he was a sculptor and considered painting to be less serious), he reluctantly accepted the commission of this arduous project from Pope Julius II in 1508. Painted between 1508 and 1512, the Sistine Chapel ceiling features 343 figures within more than 5000 square feet of painted ceiling.

Contrary to popular belief, Michelangelo did not paint the ceiling while laying on his back. Holes were drilled into the walls above the windows in the room from which brackets were placed to support a large flat scaffold on which he stood to paint. Even so, the work was physically demanding and Michelangelo wrote this amusing sonnet describing the results.
I’ve grown a goitre by dwelling in this den–
As cats from stagnant streams in Lombardy,
Or in what other land they hap to be–
Which drives the belly close beneath the chin:

My beard turns up to heaven; my nape falls in,
Fixed on my spine: my breast-bone visibly
Grows like a harp: a rich embroidery
Bedews my face from brush-drops thick and thin.

My loins into my paunch like levers grind:
My buttock like a crupper bears my weight;
My feet unguided wander to and fro;
In front my skin grows loose and long; behind,

By bending it becomes more taut and strait;
Crosswise I strain me like a Syrian bow:
Whence false and quaint, I know,
Must be the fruit of squinting brain and eye;

For ill can aim the gun that bends awry.
Come then, Giovanni, try
To succour my dead pictures and my fame;
Since foul I fare and painting is my shame.

This six-tile mural from the first half of the 20th century, depicts
Michelangelo’s magnificent Libyan Sibyl, Phemonoe, the daughter of Zeus and Poseidon’s daughter, Lamia. Phemonoe foretold the “coming of the day when that which is hidden shall be revealed”.

Each of the 6 tiles are 12″ x 12″, with the full image 36″ x 24″.  1st half, 20th century

I have also added a link to view the full ceiling.
https://upload.wikimedia.org/…/07/CAPPELLA_SISTINA_Ceiling.…

36 x 24 inches

91.44 x 60.96 cm

$3500




More items related to: , , ,

6-Tile Mural, Libyan Sibyl from Sistine Chapel

Michelangelo di Lodovico Buonarroti Simoni (1475-1564), universally known simply as Michelangelo, was arguably the greatest artist of all time. His sculpture of David is probably the most famous sculpture in the world and his frescoes on the ceiling of the Sistine Chapel are possibly man’s greatest achievement in the history of painting.

Despite his distaste for painting (he was a sculptor and considered painting to be less serious), he reluctantly accepted the commission of this arduous project from Pope Julius II in 1508. Painted between 1508 and 1512, the Sistine Chapel ceiling features 343 figures within more than 5000 square feet of painted ceiling.

Contrary to popular belief, Michelangelo did not paint the ceiling while laying on his back. Holes were drilled into the walls above the windows in the room from which brackets were placed to support a large flat scaffold on which he stood to paint. Even so, the work was physically demanding and Michelangelo wrote this amusing sonnet describing the results.
I’ve grown a goitre by dwelling in this den–
As cats from stagnant streams in Lombardy,
Or in what other land they hap to be–
Which drives the belly close beneath the chin:

My beard turns up to heaven; my nape falls in,
Fixed on my spine: my breast-bone visibly
Grows like a harp: a rich embroidery
Bedews my face from brush-drops thick and thin.

My loins into my paunch like levers grind:
My buttock like a crupper bears my weight;
My feet unguided wander to and fro;
In front my skin grows loose and long; behind,

By bending it becomes more taut and strait;
Crosswise I strain me like a Syrian bow:
Whence false and quaint, I know,
Must be the fruit of squinting brain and eye;

For ill can aim the gun that bends awry.
Come then, Giovanni, try
To succour my dead pictures and my fame;
Since foul I fare and painting is my shame.

This six-tile mural from the first half of the 20th century, depicts
Michelangelo’s magnificent Libyan Sibyl, Phemonoe, the daughter of Zeus and Poseidon’s daughter, Lamia. Phemonoe foretold the “coming of the day when that which is hidden shall be revealed”.

Each of the 6 tiles are 12″ x 12″, with the full image 36″ x 24″.  1st half, 20th century

I have also added a link to view the full ceiling.
https://upload.wikimedia.org/…/07/CAPPELLA_SISTINA_Ceiling.…

36 x 24 inches

91.44 x 60.96 cm

$3500




More items related to: , , ,

6-Tile Mural, Libyan Sibyl from Sistine Chapel

Michelangelo di Lodovico Buonarroti Simoni (1475-1564), universally known simply as Michelangelo, was arguably the greatest artist of all time. His sculpture of David is probably the most famous sculpture in the world and his frescoes on the ceiling of the Sistine Chapel are possibly man’s greatest achievement in the history of painting.

Despite his distaste for painting (he was a sculptor and considered painting to be less serious), he reluctantly accepted the commission of this arduous project from Pope Julius II in 1508. Painted between 1508 and 1512, the Sistine Chapel ceiling features 343 figures within more than 5000 square feet of painted ceiling.

Contrary to popular belief, Michelangelo did not paint the ceiling while laying on his back. Holes were drilled into the walls above the windows in the room from which brackets were placed to support a large flat scaffold on which he stood to paint. Even so, the work was physically demanding and Michelangelo wrote this amusing sonnet describing the results.
I’ve grown a goitre by dwelling in this den–
As cats from stagnant streams in Lombardy,
Or in what other land they hap to be–
Which drives the belly close beneath the chin:

My beard turns up to heaven; my nape falls in,
Fixed on my spine: my breast-bone visibly
Grows like a harp: a rich embroidery
Bedews my face from brush-drops thick and thin.

My loins into my paunch like levers grind:
My buttock like a crupper bears my weight;
My feet unguided wander to and fro;
In front my skin grows loose and long; behind,

By bending it becomes more taut and strait;
Crosswise I strain me like a Syrian bow:
Whence false and quaint, I know,
Must be the fruit of squinting brain and eye;

For ill can aim the gun that bends awry.
Come then, Giovanni, try
To succour my dead pictures and my fame;
Since foul I fare and painting is my shame.

This six-tile mural from the first half of the 20th century, depicts
Michelangelo’s magnificent Libyan Sibyl, Phemonoe, the daughter of Zeus and Poseidon’s daughter, Lamia. Phemonoe foretold the “coming of the day when that which is hidden shall be revealed”.

Each of the 6 tiles are 12″ x 12″, with the full image 36″ x 24″.  1st half, 20th century

I have also added a link to view the full ceiling.
https://upload.wikimedia.org/…/07/CAPPELLA_SISTINA_Ceiling.…

36 x 24 inches

91.44 x 60.96 cm

$3500




More items related to: , , ,

6-Tile Mural, Libyan Sibyl from Sistine Chapel

Michelangelo di Lodovico Buonarroti Simoni (1475-1564), universally known simply as Michelangelo, was arguably the greatest artist of all time. His sculpture of David is probably the most famous sculpture in the world and his frescoes on the ceiling of the Sistine Chapel are possibly man’s greatest achievement in the history of painting.

Despite his distaste for painting (he was a sculptor and considered painting to be less serious), he reluctantly accepted the commission of this arduous project from Pope Julius II in 1508. Painted between 1508 and 1512, the Sistine Chapel ceiling features 343 figures within more than 5000 square feet of painted ceiling.

Contrary to popular belief, Michelangelo did not paint the ceiling while laying on his back. Holes were drilled into the walls above the windows in the room from which brackets were placed to support a large flat scaffold on which he stood to paint. Even so, the work was physically demanding and Michelangelo wrote this amusing sonnet describing the results.
I’ve grown a goitre by dwelling in this den–
As cats from stagnant streams in Lombardy,
Or in what other land they hap to be–
Which drives the belly close beneath the chin:

My beard turns up to heaven; my nape falls in,
Fixed on my spine: my breast-bone visibly
Grows like a harp: a rich embroidery
Bedews my face from brush-drops thick and thin.

My loins into my paunch like levers grind:
My buttock like a crupper bears my weight;
My feet unguided wander to and fro;
In front my skin grows loose and long; behind,

By bending it becomes more taut and strait;
Crosswise I strain me like a Syrian bow:
Whence false and quaint, I know,
Must be the fruit of squinting brain and eye;

For ill can aim the gun that bends awry.
Come then, Giovanni, try
To succour my dead pictures and my fame;
Since foul I fare and painting is my shame.

This six-tile mural from the first half of the 20th century, depicts
Michelangelo’s magnificent Libyan Sibyl, Phemonoe, the daughter of Zeus and Poseidon’s daughter, Lamia. Phemonoe foretold the “coming of the day when that which is hidden shall be revealed”.

Each of the 6 tiles are 12″ x 12″, with the full image 36″ x 24″.  1st half, 20th century

I have also added a link to view the full ceiling.
https://upload.wikimedia.org/…/07/CAPPELLA_SISTINA_Ceiling.…

36 x 24 inches

91.44 x 60.96 cm

$3500




More items related to: , , ,

6-Tile Mural, Libyan Sibyl from Sistine Chapel

Michelangelo di Lodovico Buonarroti Simoni (1475-1564), universally known simply as Michelangelo, was arguably the greatest artist of all time. His sculpture of David is probably the most famous sculpture in the world and his frescoes on the ceiling of the Sistine Chapel are possibly man’s greatest achievement in the history of painting.

Despite his distaste for painting (he was a sculptor and considered painting to be less serious), he reluctantly accepted the commission of this arduous project from Pope Julius II in 1508. Painted between 1508 and 1512, the Sistine Chapel ceiling features 343 figures within more than 5000 square feet of painted ceiling.

Contrary to popular belief, Michelangelo did not paint the ceiling while laying on his back. Holes were drilled into the walls above the windows in the room from which brackets were placed to support a large flat scaffold on which he stood to paint. Even so, the work was physically demanding and Michelangelo wrote this amusing sonnet describing the results.
I’ve grown a goitre by dwelling in this den–
As cats from stagnant streams in Lombardy,
Or in what other land they hap to be–
Which drives the belly close beneath the chin:

My beard turns up to heaven; my nape falls in,
Fixed on my spine: my breast-bone visibly
Grows like a harp: a rich embroidery
Bedews my face from brush-drops thick and thin.

My loins into my paunch like levers grind:
My buttock like a crupper bears my weight;
My feet unguided wander to and fro;
In front my skin grows loose and long; behind,

By bending it becomes more taut and strait;
Crosswise I strain me like a Syrian bow:
Whence false and quaint, I know,
Must be the fruit of squinting brain and eye;

For ill can aim the gun that bends awry.
Come then, Giovanni, try
To succour my dead pictures and my fame;
Since foul I fare and painting is my shame.

This six-tile mural from the first half of the 20th century, depicts
Michelangelo’s magnificent Libyan Sibyl, Phemonoe, the daughter of Zeus and Poseidon’s daughter, Lamia. Phemonoe foretold the “coming of the day when that which is hidden shall be revealed”.

Each of the 6 tiles are 12″ x 12″, with the full image 36″ x 24″.  1st half, 20th century

I have also added a link to view the full ceiling.
https://upload.wikimedia.org/…/07/CAPPELLA_SISTINA_Ceiling.…

36 x 24 inches

91.44 x 60.96 cm

$3500




More items related to: , , ,

6-Tile Mural, Libyan Sibyl from Sistine Chapel

Michelangelo di Lodovico Buonarroti Simoni (1475-1564), universally known simply as Michelangelo, was arguably the greatest artist of all time. His sculpture of David is probably the most famous sculpture in the world and his frescoes on the ceiling of the Sistine Chapel are possibly man’s greatest achievement in the history of painting.

Despite his distaste for painting (he was a sculptor and considered painting to be less serious), he reluctantly accepted the commission of this arduous project from Pope Julius II in 1508. Painted between 1508 and 1512, the Sistine Chapel ceiling features 343 figures within more than 5000 square feet of painted ceiling.

Contrary to popular belief, Michelangelo did not paint the ceiling while laying on his back. Holes were drilled into the walls above the windows in the room from which brackets were placed to support a large flat scaffold on which he stood to paint. Even so, the work was physically demanding and Michelangelo wrote this amusing sonnet describing the results.
I’ve grown a goitre by dwelling in this den–
As cats from stagnant streams in Lombardy,
Or in what other land they hap to be–
Which drives the belly close beneath the chin:

My beard turns up to heaven; my nape falls in,
Fixed on my spine: my breast-bone visibly
Grows like a harp: a rich embroidery
Bedews my face from brush-drops thick and thin.

My loins into my paunch like levers grind:
My buttock like a crupper bears my weight;
My feet unguided wander to and fro;
In front my skin grows loose and long; behind,

By bending it becomes more taut and strait;
Crosswise I strain me like a Syrian bow:
Whence false and quaint, I know,
Must be the fruit of squinting brain and eye;

For ill can aim the gun that bends awry.
Come then, Giovanni, try
To succour my dead pictures and my fame;
Since foul I fare and painting is my shame.

This six-tile mural from the first half of the 20th century, depicts
Michelangelo’s magnificent Libyan Sibyl, Phemonoe, the daughter of Zeus and Poseidon’s daughter, Lamia. Phemonoe foretold the “coming of the day when that which is hidden shall be revealed”.

Each of the 6 tiles are 12″ x 12″, with the full image 36″ x 24″.  1st half, 20th century

I have also added a link to view the full ceiling.
https://upload.wikimedia.org/…/07/CAPPELLA_SISTINA_Ceiling.…

36 x 24 inches

91.44 x 60.96 cm

$3500




More items related to: , , ,

6-Tile Mural, Libyan Sibyl from Sistine Chapel

Michelangelo di Lodovico Buonarroti Simoni (1475-1564), universally known simply as Michelangelo, was arguably the greatest artist of all time. His sculpture of David is probably the most famous sculpture in the world and his frescoes on the ceiling of the Sistine Chapel are possibly man’s greatest achievement in the history of painting.

Despite his distaste for painting (he was a sculptor and considered painting to be less serious), he reluctantly accepted the commission of this arduous project from Pope Julius II in 1508. Painted between 1508 and 1512, the Sistine Chapel ceiling features 343 figures within more than 5000 square feet of painted ceiling.

Contrary to popular belief, Michelangelo did not paint the ceiling while laying on his back. Holes were drilled into the walls above the windows in the room from which brackets were placed to support a large flat scaffold on which he stood to paint. Even so, the work was physically demanding and Michelangelo wrote this amusing sonnet describing the results.
I’ve grown a goitre by dwelling in this den–
As cats from stagnant streams in Lombardy,
Or in what other land they hap to be–
Which drives the belly close beneath the chin:

My beard turns up to heaven; my nape falls in,
Fixed on my spine: my breast-bone visibly
Grows like a harp: a rich embroidery
Bedews my face from brush-drops thick and thin.

My loins into my paunch like levers grind:
My buttock like a crupper bears my weight;
My feet unguided wander to and fro;
In front my skin grows loose and long; behind,

By bending it becomes more taut and strait;
Crosswise I strain me like a Syrian bow:
Whence false and quaint, I know,
Must be the fruit of squinting brain and eye;

For ill can aim the gun that bends awry.
Come then, Giovanni, try
To succour my dead pictures and my fame;
Since foul I fare and painting is my shame.

This six-tile mural from the first half of the 20th century, depicts
Michelangelo’s magnificent Libyan Sibyl, Phemonoe, the daughter of Zeus and Poseidon’s daughter, Lamia. Phemonoe foretold the “coming of the day when that which is hidden shall be revealed”.

Each of the 6 tiles are 12″ x 12″, with the full image 36″ x 24″.  1st half, 20th century

I have also added a link to view the full ceiling.
https://upload.wikimedia.org/…/07/CAPPELLA_SISTINA_Ceiling.…

36 x 24 inches

91.44 x 60.96 cm

$3500




More items related to: , , ,

6-Tile Mural, Libyan Sibyl from Sistine Chapel

Michelangelo di Lodovico Buonarroti Simoni (1475-1564), universally known simply as Michelangelo, was arguably the greatest artist of all time. His sculpture of David is probably the most famous sculpture in the world and his frescoes on the ceiling of the Sistine Chapel are possibly man’s greatest achievement in the history of painting.

Despite his distaste for painting (he was a sculptor and considered painting to be less serious), he reluctantly accepted the commission of this arduous project from Pope Julius II in 1508. Painted between 1508 and 1512, the Sistine Chapel ceiling features 343 figures within more than 5000 square feet of painted ceiling.

Contrary to popular belief, Michelangelo did not paint the ceiling while laying on his back. Holes were drilled into the walls above the windows in the room from which brackets were placed to support a large flat scaffold on which he stood to paint. Even so, the work was physically demanding and Michelangelo wrote this amusing sonnet describing the results.
I’ve grown a goitre by dwelling in this den–
As cats from stagnant streams in Lombardy,
Or in what other land they hap to be–
Which drives the belly close beneath the chin:

My beard turns up to heaven; my nape falls in,
Fixed on my spine: my breast-bone visibly
Grows like a harp: a rich embroidery
Bedews my face from brush-drops thick and thin.

My loins into my paunch like levers grind:
My buttock like a crupper bears my weight;
My feet unguided wander to and fro;
In front my skin grows loose and long; behind,

By bending it becomes more taut and strait;
Crosswise I strain me like a Syrian bow:
Whence false and quaint, I know,
Must be the fruit of squinting brain and eye;

For ill can aim the gun that bends awry.
Come then, Giovanni, try
To succour my dead pictures and my fame;
Since foul I fare and painting is my shame.

This six-tile mural from the first half of the 20th century, depicts
Michelangelo’s magnificent Libyan Sibyl, Phemonoe, the daughter of Zeus and Poseidon’s daughter, Lamia. Phemonoe foretold the “coming of the day when that which is hidden shall be revealed”.

Each of the 6 tiles are 12″ x 12″, with the full image 36″ x 24″.  1st half, 20th century

I have also added a link to view the full ceiling.
https://upload.wikimedia.org/…/07/CAPPELLA_SISTINA_Ceiling.…

36 x 24 inches

91.44 x 60.96 cm

$3500




More items related to: , , ,

6-Tile Mural, Libyan Sibyl from Sistine Chapel

Michelangelo di Lodovico Buonarroti Simoni (1475-1564), universally known simply as Michelangelo, was arguably the greatest artist of all time. His sculpture of David is probably the most famous sculpture in the world and his frescoes on the ceiling of the Sistine Chapel are possibly man’s greatest achievement in the history of painting.

Despite his distaste for painting (he was a sculptor and considered painting to be less serious), he reluctantly accepted the commission of this arduous project from Pope Julius II in 1508. Painted between 1508 and 1512, the Sistine Chapel ceiling features 343 figures within more than 5000 square feet of painted ceiling.

Contrary to popular belief, Michelangelo did not paint the ceiling while laying on his back. Holes were drilled into the walls above the windows in the room from which brackets were placed to support a large flat scaffold on which he stood to paint. Even so, the work was physically demanding and Michelangelo wrote this amusing sonnet describing the results.
I’ve grown a goitre by dwelling in this den–
As cats from stagnant streams in Lombardy,
Or in what other land they hap to be–
Which drives the belly close beneath the chin:

My beard turns up to heaven; my nape falls in,
Fixed on my spine: my breast-bone visibly
Grows like a harp: a rich embroidery
Bedews my face from brush-drops thick and thin.

My loins into my paunch like levers grind:
My buttock like a crupper bears my weight;
My feet unguided wander to and fro;
In front my skin grows loose and long; behind,

By bending it becomes more taut and strait;
Crosswise I strain me like a Syrian bow:
Whence false and quaint, I know,
Must be the fruit of squinting brain and eye;

For ill can aim the gun that bends awry.
Come then, Giovanni, try
To succour my dead pictures and my fame;
Since foul I fare and painting is my shame.

This six-tile mural from the first half of the 20th century, depicts
Michelangelo’s magnificent Libyan Sibyl, Phemonoe, the daughter of Zeus and Poseidon’s daughter, Lamia. Phemonoe foretold the “coming of the day when that which is hidden shall be revealed”.

Each of the 6 tiles are 12″ x 12″, with the full image 36″ x 24″.  1st half, 20th century

I have also added a link to view the full ceiling.
https://upload.wikimedia.org/…/07/CAPPELLA_SISTINA_Ceiling.…

36 x 24 inches

91.44 x 60.96 cm

$3500




More items related to: , , ,

6-Tile Mural, Libyan Sibyl from Sistine Chapel

Michelangelo di Lodovico Buonarroti Simoni (1475-1564), universally known simply as Michelangelo, was arguably the greatest artist of all time. His sculpture of David is probably the most famous sculpture in the world and his frescoes on the ceiling of the Sistine Chapel are possibly man’s greatest achievement in the history of painting.

Despite his distaste for painting (he was a sculptor and considered painting to be less serious), he reluctantly accepted the commission of this arduous project from Pope Julius II in 1508. Painted between 1508 and 1512, the Sistine Chapel ceiling features 343 figures within more than 5000 square feet of painted ceiling.

Contrary to popular belief, Michelangelo did not paint the ceiling while laying on his back. Holes were drilled into the walls above the windows in the room from which brackets were placed to support a large flat scaffold on which he stood to paint. Even so, the work was physically demanding and Michelangelo wrote this amusing sonnet describing the results.
I’ve grown a goitre by dwelling in this den–
As cats from stagnant streams in Lombardy,
Or in what other land they hap to be–
Which drives the belly close beneath the chin:

My beard turns up to heaven; my nape falls in,
Fixed on my spine: my breast-bone visibly
Grows like a harp: a rich embroidery
Bedews my face from brush-drops thick and thin.

My loins into my paunch like levers grind:
My buttock like a crupper bears my weight;
My feet unguided wander to and fro;
In front my skin grows loose and long; behind,

By bending it becomes more taut and strait;
Crosswise I strain me like a Syrian bow:
Whence false and quaint, I know,
Must be the fruit of squinting brain and eye;

For ill can aim the gun that bends awry.
Come then, Giovanni, try
To succour my dead pictures and my fame;
Since foul I fare and painting is my shame.

This six-tile mural from the first half of the 20th century, depicts
Michelangelo’s magnificent Libyan Sibyl, Phemonoe, the daughter of Zeus and Poseidon’s daughter, Lamia. Phemonoe foretold the “coming of the day when that which is hidden shall be revealed”.

Each of the 6 tiles are 12″ x 12″, with the full image 36″ x 24″.  1st half, 20th century

I have also added a link to view the full ceiling.
https://upload.wikimedia.org/…/07/CAPPELLA_SISTINA_Ceiling.…

36 x 24 inches

91.44 x 60.96 cm

$3500




More items related to: , , ,

6-Tile Mural, Libyan Sibyl from Sistine Chapel

Michelangelo di Lodovico Buonarroti Simoni (1475-1564), universally known simply as Michelangelo, was arguably the greatest artist of all time. His sculpture of David is probably the most famous sculpture in the world and his frescoes on the ceiling of the Sistine Chapel are possibly man’s greatest achievement in the history of painting.

Despite his distaste for painting (he was a sculptor and considered painting to be less serious), he reluctantly accepted the commission of this arduous project from Pope Julius II in 1508. Painted between 1508 and 1512, the Sistine Chapel ceiling features 343 figures within more than 5000 square feet of painted ceiling.

Contrary to popular belief, Michelangelo did not paint the ceiling while laying on his back. Holes were drilled into the walls above the windows in the room from which brackets were placed to support a large flat scaffold on which he stood to paint. Even so, the work was physically demanding and Michelangelo wrote this amusing sonnet describing the results.
I’ve grown a goitre by dwelling in this den–
As cats from stagnant streams in Lombardy,
Or in what other land they hap to be–
Which drives the belly close beneath the chin:

My beard turns up to heaven; my nape falls in,
Fixed on my spine: my breast-bone visibly
Grows like a harp: a rich embroidery
Bedews my face from brush-drops thick and thin.

My loins into my paunch like levers grind:
My buttock like a crupper bears my weight;
My feet unguided wander to and fro;
In front my skin grows loose and long; behind,

By bending it becomes more taut and strait;
Crosswise I strain me like a Syrian bow:
Whence false and quaint, I know,
Must be the fruit of squinting brain and eye;

For ill can aim the gun that bends awry.
Come then, Giovanni, try
To succour my dead pictures and my fame;
Since foul I fare and painting is my shame.

This six-tile mural from the first half of the 20th century, depicts
Michelangelo’s magnificent Libyan Sibyl, Phemonoe, the daughter of Zeus and Poseidon’s daughter, Lamia. Phemonoe foretold the “coming of the day when that which is hidden shall be revealed”.

Each of the 6 tiles are 12″ x 12″, with the full image 36″ x 24″.  1st half, 20th century

I have also added a link to view the full ceiling.
https://upload.wikimedia.org/…/07/CAPPELLA_SISTINA_Ceiling.…

36 x 24 inches

91.44 x 60.96 cm

$3500




More items related to: , , ,

6-Tile Mural, Libyan Sibyl from Sistine Chapel

Michelangelo di Lodovico Buonarroti Simoni (1475-1564), universally known simply as Michelangelo, was arguably the greatest artist of all time. His sculpture of David is probably the most famous sculpture in the world and his frescoes on the ceiling of the Sistine Chapel are possibly man’s greatest achievement in the history of painting.

Despite his distaste for painting (he was a sculptor and considered painting to be less serious), he reluctantly accepted the commission of this arduous project from Pope Julius II in 1508. Painted between 1508 and 1512, the Sistine Chapel ceiling features 343 figures within more than 5000 square feet of painted ceiling.

Contrary to popular belief, Michelangelo did not paint the ceiling while laying on his back. Holes were drilled into the walls above the windows in the room from which brackets were placed to support a large flat scaffold on which he stood to paint. Even so, the work was physically demanding and Michelangelo wrote this amusing sonnet describing the results.
I’ve grown a goitre by dwelling in this den–
As cats from stagnant streams in Lombardy,
Or in what other land they hap to be–
Which drives the belly close beneath the chin:

My beard turns up to heaven; my nape falls in,
Fixed on my spine: my breast-bone visibly
Grows like a harp: a rich embroidery
Bedews my face from brush-drops thick and thin.

My loins into my paunch like levers grind:
My buttock like a crupper bears my weight;
My feet unguided wander to and fro;
In front my skin grows loose and long; behind,

By bending it becomes more taut and strait;
Crosswise I strain me like a Syrian bow:
Whence false and quaint, I know,
Must be the fruit of squinting brain and eye;

For ill can aim the gun that bends awry.
Come then, Giovanni, try
To succour my dead pictures and my fame;
Since foul I fare and painting is my shame.

This six-tile mural from the first half of the 20th century, depicts
Michelangelo’s magnificent Libyan Sibyl, Phemonoe, the daughter of Zeus and Poseidon’s daughter, Lamia. Phemonoe foretold the “coming of the day when that which is hidden shall be revealed”.

Each of the 6 tiles are 12″ x 12″, with the full image 36″ x 24″.  1st half, 20th century

I have also added a link to view the full ceiling.
https://upload.wikimedia.org/…/07/CAPPELLA_SISTINA_Ceiling.…

36 x 24 inches

91.44 x 60.96 cm

$3500




More items related to: , , ,

6-Tile Mural, Libyan Sibyl from Sistine Chapel

Michelangelo di Lodovico Buonarroti Simoni (1475-1564), universally known simply as Michelangelo, was arguably the greatest artist of all time. His sculpture of David is probably the most famous sculpture in the world and his frescoes on the ceiling of the Sistine Chapel are possibly man’s greatest achievement in the history of painting.

Despite his distaste for painting (he was a sculptor and considered painting to be less serious), he reluctantly accepted the commission of this arduous project from Pope Julius II in 1508. Painted between 1508 and 1512, the Sistine Chapel ceiling features 343 figures within more than 5000 square feet of painted ceiling.

Contrary to popular belief, Michelangelo did not paint the ceiling while laying on his back. Holes were drilled into the walls above the windows in the room from which brackets were placed to support a large flat scaffold on which he stood to paint. Even so, the work was physically demanding and Michelangelo wrote this amusing sonnet describing the results.
I’ve grown a goitre by dwelling in this den–
As cats from stagnant streams in Lombardy,
Or in what other land they hap to be–
Which drives the belly close beneath the chin:

My beard turns up to heaven; my nape falls in,
Fixed on my spine: my breast-bone visibly
Grows like a harp: a rich embroidery
Bedews my face from brush-drops thick and thin.

My loins into my paunch like levers grind:
My buttock like a crupper bears my weight;
My feet unguided wander to and fro;
In front my skin grows loose and long; behind,

By bending it becomes more taut and strait;
Crosswise I strain me like a Syrian bow:
Whence false and quaint, I know,
Must be the fruit of squinting brain and eye;

For ill can aim the gun that bends awry.
Come then, Giovanni, try
To succour my dead pictures and my fame;
Since foul I fare and painting is my shame.

This six-tile mural from the first half of the 20th century, depicts
Michelangelo’s magnificent Libyan Sibyl, Phemonoe, the daughter of Zeus and Poseidon’s daughter, Lamia. Phemonoe foretold the “coming of the day when that which is hidden shall be revealed”.

Each of the 6 tiles are 12″ x 12″, with the full image 36″ x 24″.  1st half, 20th century

I have also added a link to view the full ceiling.
https://upload.wikimedia.org/…/07/CAPPELLA_SISTINA_Ceiling.…

36 x 24 inches

91.44 x 60.96 cm

$3500




More items related to: , , ,

6-Tile Mural, Libyan Sibyl from Sistine Chapel

Michelangelo di Lodovico Buonarroti Simoni (1475-1564), universally known simply as Michelangelo, was arguably the greatest artist of all time. His sculpture of David is probably the most famous sculpture in the world and his frescoes on the ceiling of the Sistine Chapel are possibly man’s greatest achievement in the history of painting.

Despite his distaste for painting (he was a sculptor and considered painting to be less serious), he reluctantly accepted the commission of this arduous project from Pope Julius II in 1508. Painted between 1508 and 1512, the Sistine Chapel ceiling features 343 figures within more than 5000 square feet of painted ceiling.

Contrary to popular belief, Michelangelo did not paint the ceiling while laying on his back. Holes were drilled into the walls above the windows in the room from which brackets were placed to support a large flat scaffold on which he stood to paint. Even so, the work was physically demanding and Michelangelo wrote this amusing sonnet describing the results.
I’ve grown a goitre by dwelling in this den–
As cats from stagnant streams in Lombardy,
Or in what other land they hap to be–
Which drives the belly close beneath the chin:

My beard turns up to heaven; my nape falls in,
Fixed on my spine: my breast-bone visibly
Grows like a harp: a rich embroidery
Bedews my face from brush-drops thick and thin.

My loins into my paunch like levers grind:
My buttock like a crupper bears my weight;
My feet unguided wander to and fro;
In front my skin grows loose and long; behind,

By bending it becomes more taut and strait;
Crosswise I strain me like a Syrian bow:
Whence false and quaint, I know,
Must be the fruit of squinting brain and eye;

For ill can aim the gun that bends awry.
Come then, Giovanni, try
To succour my dead pictures and my fame;
Since foul I fare and painting is my shame.

This six-tile mural from the first half of the 20th century, depicts
Michelangelo’s magnificent Libyan Sibyl, Phemonoe, the daughter of Zeus and Poseidon’s daughter, Lamia. Phemonoe foretold the “coming of the day when that which is hidden shall be revealed”.

Each of the 6 tiles are 12″ x 12″, with the full image 36″ x 24″.  1st half, 20th century

I have also added a link to view the full ceiling.
https://upload.wikimedia.org/…/07/CAPPELLA_SISTINA_Ceiling.…

36 x 24 inches

91.44 x 60.96 cm

$3500




More items related to: , , ,

6-Tile Mural, Libyan Sibyl from Sistine Chapel

Michelangelo di Lodovico Buonarroti Simoni (1475-1564), universally known simply as Michelangelo, was arguably the greatest artist of all time. His sculpture of David is probably the most famous sculpture in the world and his frescoes on the ceiling of the Sistine Chapel are possibly man’s greatest achievement in the history of painting.

Despite his distaste for painting (he was a sculptor and considered painting to be less serious), he reluctantly accepted the commission of this arduous project from Pope Julius II in 1508. Painted between 1508 and 1512, the Sistine Chapel ceiling features 343 figures within more than 5000 square feet of painted ceiling.

Contrary to popular belief, Michelangelo did not paint the ceiling while laying on his back. Holes were drilled into the walls above the windows in the room from which brackets were placed to support a large flat scaffold on which he stood to paint. Even so, the work was physically demanding and Michelangelo wrote this amusing sonnet describing the results.
I’ve grown a goitre by dwelling in this den–
As cats from stagnant streams in Lombardy,
Or in what other land they hap to be–
Which drives the belly close beneath the chin:

My beard turns up to heaven; my nape falls in,
Fixed on my spine: my breast-bone visibly
Grows like a harp: a rich embroidery
Bedews my face from brush-drops thick and thin.

My loins into my paunch like levers grind:
My buttock like a crupper bears my weight;
My feet unguided wander to and fro;
In front my skin grows loose and long; behind,

By bending it becomes more taut and strait;
Crosswise I strain me like a Syrian bow:
Whence false and quaint, I know,
Must be the fruit of squinting brain and eye;

For ill can aim the gun that bends awry.
Come then, Giovanni, try
To succour my dead pictures and my fame;
Since foul I fare and painting is my shame.

This six-tile mural from the first half of the 20th century, depicts
Michelangelo’s magnificent Libyan Sibyl, Phemonoe, the daughter of Zeus and Poseidon’s daughter, Lamia. Phemonoe foretold the “coming of the day when that which is hidden shall be revealed”.

Each of the 6 tiles are 12″ x 12″, with the full image 36″ x 24″.  1st half, 20th century

I have also added a link to view the full ceiling.
https://upload.wikimedia.org/…/07/CAPPELLA_SISTINA_Ceiling.…

36 x 24 inches

91.44 x 60.96 cm

$3500




More items related to: , , ,

6-Tile Mural, Libyan Sibyl from Sistine Chapel

Michelangelo di Lodovico Buonarroti Simoni (1475-1564), universally known simply as Michelangelo, was arguably the greatest artist of all time. His sculpture of David is probably the most famous sculpture in the world and his frescoes on the ceiling of the Sistine Chapel are possibly man’s greatest achievement in the history of painting.

Despite his distaste for painting (he was a sculptor and considered painting to be less serious), he reluctantly accepted the commission of this arduous project from Pope Julius II in 1508. Painted between 1508 and 1512, the Sistine Chapel ceiling features 343 figures within more than 5000 square feet of painted ceiling.

Contrary to popular belief, Michelangelo did not paint the ceiling while laying on his back. Holes were drilled into the walls above the windows in the room from which brackets were placed to support a large flat scaffold on which he stood to paint. Even so, the work was physically demanding and Michelangelo wrote this amusing sonnet describing the results.
I’ve grown a goitre by dwelling in this den–
As cats from stagnant streams in Lombardy,
Or in what other land they hap to be–
Which drives the belly close beneath the chin:

My beard turns up to heaven; my nape falls in,
Fixed on my spine: my breast-bone visibly
Grows like a harp: a rich embroidery
Bedews my face from brush-drops thick and thin.

My loins into my paunch like levers grind:
My buttock like a crupper bears my weight;
My feet unguided wander to and fro;
In front my skin grows loose and long; behind,

By bending it becomes more taut and strait;
Crosswise I strain me like a Syrian bow:
Whence false and quaint, I know,
Must be the fruit of squinting brain and eye;

For ill can aim the gun that bends awry.
Come then, Giovanni, try
To succour my dead pictures and my fame;
Since foul I fare and painting is my shame.

This six-tile mural from the first half of the 20th century, depicts
Michelangelo’s magnificent Libyan Sibyl, Phemonoe, the daughter of Zeus and Poseidon’s daughter, Lamia. Phemonoe foretold the “coming of the day when that which is hidden shall be revealed”.

Each of the 6 tiles are 12″ x 12″, with the full image 36″ x 24″.  1st half, 20th century

I have also added a link to view the full ceiling.
https://upload.wikimedia.org/…/07/CAPPELLA_SISTINA_Ceiling.…

36 x 24 inches

91.44 x 60.96 cm

$3500




More items related to: , , ,

6-Tile Mural, Libyan Sibyl from Sistine Chapel

Michelangelo di Lodovico Buonarroti Simoni (1475-1564), universally known simply as Michelangelo, was arguably the greatest artist of all time. His sculpture of David is probably the most famous sculpture in the world and his frescoes on the ceiling of the Sistine Chapel are possibly man’s greatest achievement in the history of painting.

Despite his distaste for painting (he was a sculptor and considered painting to be less serious), he reluctantly accepted the commission of this arduous project from Pope Julius II in 1508. Painted between 1508 and 1512, the Sistine Chapel ceiling features 343 figures within more than 5000 square feet of painted ceiling.

Contrary to popular belief, Michelangelo did not paint the ceiling while laying on his back. Holes were drilled into the walls above the windows in the room from which brackets were placed to support a large flat scaffold on which he stood to paint. Even so, the work was physically demanding and Michelangelo wrote this amusing sonnet describing the results.
I’ve grown a goitre by dwelling in this den–
As cats from stagnant streams in Lombardy,
Or in what other land they hap to be–
Which drives the belly close beneath the chin:

My beard turns up to heaven; my nape falls in,
Fixed on my spine: my breast-bone visibly
Grows like a harp: a rich embroidery
Bedews my face from brush-drops thick and thin.

My loins into my paunch like levers grind:
My buttock like a crupper bears my weight;
My feet unguided wander to and fro;
In front my skin grows loose and long; behind,

By bending it becomes more taut and strait;
Crosswise I strain me like a Syrian bow:
Whence false and quaint, I know,
Must be the fruit of squinting brain and eye;

For ill can aim the gun that bends awry.
Come then, Giovanni, try
To succour my dead pictures and my fame;
Since foul I fare and painting is my shame.

This six-tile mural from the first half of the 20th century, depicts
Michelangelo’s magnificent Libyan Sibyl, Phemonoe, the daughter of Zeus and Poseidon’s daughter, Lamia. Phemonoe foretold the “coming of the day when that which is hidden shall be revealed”.

Each of the 6 tiles are 12″ x 12″, with the full image 36″ x 24″.  1st half, 20th century

I have also added a link to view the full ceiling.
https://upload.wikimedia.org/…/07/CAPPELLA_SISTINA_Ceiling.…

36 x 24 inches

91.44 x 60.96 cm

$3500




More items related to: , , ,

6-Tile Mural, Libyan Sibyl from Sistine Chapel

Michelangelo di Lodovico Buonarroti Simoni (1475-1564), universally known simply as Michelangelo, was arguably the greatest artist of all time. His sculpture of David is probably the most famous sculpture in the world and his frescoes on the ceiling of the Sistine Chapel are possibly man’s greatest achievement in the history of painting.

Despite his distaste for painting (he was a sculptor and considered painting to be less serious), he reluctantly accepted the commission of this arduous project from Pope Julius II in 1508. Painted between 1508 and 1512, the Sistine Chapel ceiling features 343 figures within more than 5000 square feet of painted ceiling.

Contrary to popular belief, Michelangelo did not paint the ceiling while laying on his back. Holes were drilled into the walls above the windows in the room from which brackets were placed to support a large flat scaffold on which he stood to paint. Even so, the work was physically demanding and Michelangelo wrote this amusing sonnet describing the results.
I’ve grown a goitre by dwelling in this den–
As cats from stagnant streams in Lombardy,
Or in what other land they hap to be–
Which drives the belly close beneath the chin:

My beard turns up to heaven; my nape falls in,
Fixed on my spine: my breast-bone visibly
Grows like a harp: a rich embroidery
Bedews my face from brush-drops thick and thin.

My loins into my paunch like levers grind:
My buttock like a crupper bears my weight;
My feet unguided wander to and fro;
In front my skin grows loose and long; behind,

By bending it becomes more taut and strait;
Crosswise I strain me like a Syrian bow:
Whence false and quaint, I know,
Must be the fruit of squinting brain and eye;

For ill can aim the gun that bends awry.
Come then, Giovanni, try
To succour my dead pictures and my fame;
Since foul I fare and painting is my shame.

This six-tile mural from the first half of the 20th century, depicts
Michelangelo’s magnificent Libyan Sibyl, Phemonoe, the daughter of Zeus and Poseidon’s daughter, Lamia. Phemonoe foretold the “coming of the day when that which is hidden shall be revealed”.

Each of the 6 tiles are 12″ x 12″, with the full image 36″ x 24″.  1st half, 20th century

I have also added a link to view the full ceiling.
https://upload.wikimedia.org/…/07/CAPPELLA_SISTINA_Ceiling.…

36 x 24 inches

91.44 x 60.96 cm

$3500




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6-Tile Mural, Libyan Sibyl from Sistine Chapel

Michelangelo di Lodovico Buonarroti Simoni (1475-1564), universally known simply as Michelangelo, was arguably the greatest artist of all time. His sculpture of David is probably the most famous sculpture in the world and his frescoes on the ceiling of the Sistine Chapel are possibly man’s greatest achievement in the history of painting.

Despite his distaste for painting (he was a sculptor and considered painting to be less serious), he reluctantly accepted the commission of this arduous project from Pope Julius II in 1508. Painted between 1508 and 1512, the Sistine Chapel ceiling features 343 figures within more than 5000 square feet of painted ceiling.

Contrary to popular belief, Michelangelo did not paint the ceiling while laying on his back. Holes were drilled into the walls above the windows in the room from which brackets were placed to support a large flat scaffold on which he stood to paint. Even so, the work was physically demanding and Michelangelo wrote this amusing sonnet describing the results.
I’ve grown a goitre by dwelling in this den–
As cats from stagnant streams in Lombardy,
Or in what other land they hap to be–
Which drives the belly close beneath the chin:

My beard turns up to heaven; my nape falls in,
Fixed on my spine: my breast-bone visibly
Grows like a harp: a rich embroidery
Bedews my face from brush-drops thick and thin.

My loins into my paunch like levers grind:
My buttock like a crupper bears my weight;
My feet unguided wander to and fro;
In front my skin grows loose and long; behind,

By bending it becomes more taut and strait;
Crosswise I strain me like a Syrian bow:
Whence false and quaint, I know,
Must be the fruit of squinting brain and eye;

For ill can aim the gun that bends awry.
Come then, Giovanni, try
To succour my dead pictures and my fame;
Since foul I fare and painting is my shame.

This six-tile mural from the first half of the 20th century, depicts
Michelangelo’s magnificent Libyan Sibyl, Phemonoe, the daughter of Zeus and Poseidon’s daughter, Lamia. Phemonoe foretold the “coming of the day when that which is hidden shall be revealed”.

Each of the 6 tiles are 12″ x 12″, with the full image 36″ x 24″.  1st half, 20th century

I have also added a link to view the full ceiling.
https://upload.wikimedia.org/…/07/CAPPELLA_SISTINA_Ceiling.…

36 x 24 inches

91.44 x 60.96 cm

$3500